Susi Holliday • The last resort (2020)

The Last Resort • Susi Holliday • Décembre 2020 • Thomas & Mercer • 300 pages

When Amelia is invited to an all-expenses-paid retreat on a private island, the mysterious offer is too good to refuse. Along with six other strangers, she’s told they’re here to test a brand-new product for Timeo Technologies. But the guests’ excitement soon turns to terror when the real reason for their summons becomes clear.

Each guest has a guilty secret. And when they’re all forced to wear a memory-tracking device that reveals their dark and shameful deeds to their fellow guests, there’s no hiding from the past. This is no luxury retreat—it’s a trap they can’t get out of.

As the clock counts down to the lavish end-of-day party they’ve been promised, injuries and in-fighting split the group. But with no escape from the island—or the other guests’ most shocking secrets—Amelia begins to suspect that her only hope for survival is to be the last one standing. Can she confront her own dark past to uncover the truth—before it’s too late to get out?


Il me tardait de découvrir ce roman, car il me faisait penser à un autre que j’avais beaucoup aimé récemment, The Guest List de Lucy Fowley. Il y a des points communs : l’action se déroulant sur une île coupée du monde, un groupe de personnes sans lien apparent, de sombres secrets et le meurtre parfait. Mais le roman de Lucy Fowley m’a tenu en haleine d’un bout à l’autre, ce n’est pas le cas avec celui-ci.

Pourtant, il y a de bonnes idées et la quatrième de couvertures semble prometteuse. Une luxueuse île, coupée de tout, me paraît être un bon point de départ pour un huis-clos à l’ambiance pesante. Les personnages semblent la ressentir, mais pas le lecteur. Je n’ai jamais ressenti un sentiment de danger ou d’urgence. Globalement, le roman manque sérieusement de rythme, mais surtout de suspens. En effet, il y a des passages prenants où l’histoire s’accélère, avant de longs moments plats. Ils sont quand même nombreux, malheureusement. Je n’avais pas l’impression d’avancer dans l’intrigue. À la moitié du roman, je n’avais aucune idée réelle où l’auteur allait nous amener. Il y a un certain nombre de scènes ridicules qui n’aident pas à la lecture. Pourtant, l’aspect technologique pouvait être intéressant, donnant un petit côté Black Mirror. Je n’ai pas été totalement convaincu par la manière dont Susi Holliday l’exploite.

Parfois, des personnages peuvent sauver une intrigue un peu faible. Ils peuvent être très bien construits, avec des psychologies très bien développées, des passés, et des secrets. Dans un tel roman, où les personnages sont au coeur de l’histoire, c’est un point d’autant plus important à mon sens. Ce dernier a pour sujet une vengeance et, je m’attendais à ce que cet aspect du livre soit riche. Hélas, j’ai été vraiment déçue. Les personnages sont détestables. Malgré les changements de narration, aucun attachement, même infime, pour l’un ou l’autre ne se crée. Ce sont des clichés ambulants : le couple d’influenceurs, une femme d’une cinquantaine d’années, double de Miranda Priesley du Diable s’habille en Prada, mais pour la finance, un autre tout droit sorti de la Sillicone Valley… Ils ne sont nullement construits tout en nuance et ils m’ont semblé avoir tous plus ou moins le même caractère. Ils sont imbus d’eux-mêmes, sûrs de leur succès/richesse/beauté. Ils ont un côté interchangeable.

De ce fait, il est très difficile de s’intéresser à leurs sombres secrets. Or, c’est le moteur de l’intrigue. Quelle est la raison pour laquelle ils sont réunis ? Qu’ont-ils fait qui justifient leurs présences sur l’île ? Cependant, j’ai eu du mal à y trouver un quelconque intérêt, même en avançant dans l’histoire alors que la tension devrait monter en puissance. Le suspense est à la traîne.

J’avais placé beaucoup d’espoir dans ce whodunit plus que prometteur avec une île au milieu de nulle part, l’apport technologique… Je suis déçue par ce roman qui ne m’a pas du tout transporté ou passionné.

Sorties VO • Juin 2021

The Godmothers • Camille Aubray • William Morrow • 15 juin • 432 pages

Filomena is a clever and resourceful war refugee with a childhood secret, who comes to America to wed Mario, the family’s favored son. Amie, a beautiful and dreamy French girl from upstate New York, escapes an abusive husband after falling in love with Johnny, the oldest of the brothers. Lucy, a tough-as-nails Irish nurse, ran away from a strict girls’ home and marries Frankie, the sensuous middle son. And the glamorous Petrina, the family’s only daughter, graduates with honors from Barnard College despite a past trauma that nearly caused a family scandal.

All four women become godmothers to one another’s children, finding hope and shelter in this prosperous family and their sumptuous Greenwich Village home, and enjoying New York life with its fine dining, opulent department stores and sophisticated nightclubs.

But the women’s secret pasts lead to unforeseen consequences and betrayals that threaten to unravel all their carefully laid plans. And when their husbands are forced to leave them during the second World War, the Godmothers must unexpectedly contend with notorious gangsters like Frank Costello and Lucky Luciano who run the streets of New York City.

Refusing to merely imitate the world of men, the four Godmothers learn to put aside their differences and grudges so that they can work together to protect their loved ones, and to find their own unique paths to success, love, forgiveness, and the futures they’ve always dreamed of.

Sisters of the Resistance • Christine Wells • William Morrow • 8 juin • 416 pages

France, 1944: The Nazis still occupy Paris, and twenty-five-year-old Gabby Foucher hates these enemies, though, as the concierge of ten rue Royale, she makes it a point to avoid trouble, unlike her sister Yvette. Until she, like her sister, is recruited into the Resistance by Catherine Dior—sister of the fashion designer, Christian Dior.

Gabby and Yvette are both swept into the world of spies, fugitives, and Resistance workers, and it doesn’t take long for the sisters to realize that their lives are in danger.

Gabby discovers an elderly tenant is hiding a wounded British fugitive, and Yvette becomes a messenger for the Resistance. But as Gabby begins to fall in love with her patient and Yvette’s impulsiveness lead her into intrigue at an ever-higher level, both women will discover that their hearts and even their souls hang in the balance as well.

The Wolf & the Woodsman • Ava Reid • Del Rey • 8 juin • 448 pages

In her forest-veiled pagan village, Évike is the only woman without power, making her an outcast clearly abandoned by the gods. The villagers blame her corrupted bloodline—her father was a Yehuli man, one of the much-loathed servants of the fanatical king. When soldiers arrive from the Holy Order of Woodsmen to claim a pagan girl for the king’s blood sacrifice, Évike is betrayed by her fellow villagers and surrendered.

But when monsters attack the Woodsmen and their captive en route, slaughtering everyone but Évike and the cold, one-eyed captain, they have no choice but to rely on each other. Except he’s no ordinary Woodsman—he’s the disgraced prince, Gáspár Bárány, whose father needs pagan magic to consolidate his power. Gáspár fears that his cruelly zealous brother plans to seize the throne and instigate a violent reign that would damn the pagans and the Yehuli alike. As the son of a reviled foreign queen, Gáspár understands what it’s like to be an outcast, and he and Évike make a tenuous pact to stop his brother.

As their mission takes them from the bitter northern tundra to the smog-choked capital, their mutual loathing slowly turns to affection, bound by a shared history of alienation and oppression. However, trust can easily turn to betrayal, and as Évike reconnects with her estranged father and discovers her own hidden magic, she and Gáspár need to decide whose side they’re on, and what they’re willing to give up for a nation that never cared for them at all.

Daughter of Sparta • Claire M. Andrews • Jimmy Paterson Book • 8 juin • 400 pages

Seventeen-year-old Daphne has spent her entire life honing her body and mind into that of a warrior, hoping to be accepted by the unyielding people of ancient Sparta. But an unexpected encounter with the goddess Artemis—who holds Daphne’s brother’s fate in her hands—upends the life she’s worked so hard to build. Nine mysterious items have been stolen from Mount Olympus and if Daphne cannot find them, the gods’ waning powers will fade away, the mortal world will descend into chaos, and her brother’s life will be forfeit.

Guided by Artemis’s twin-the handsome and entirely-too-self-assured god Apollo-Daphne’s journey will take her from the labyrinth of the Minotaur to the riddle-spinning Sphinx of Thebes, team her up with mythological legends such as Theseus and Hippolyta of the Amazons, and pit her against the gods themselves.

Nature of Witches • Rachel Griffin • Sourcebooks Fire • 1 juin • 362 pages

For centuries, witches have maintained the climate, their power from the sun peaking in the season of their birth. But now their control is faltering as the atmosphere becomes more erratic. All hope lies with Clara, an Everwitch whose rare magic is tied to every season.

In Autumn, Clara wants nothing to do with her power. It’s wild and volatile, and the price of her magic―losing the ones she loves―is too high, despite the need to control the increasingly dangerous weather.

In Winter, the world is on the precipice of disaster. Fires burn, storms rage, and Clara accepts that she’s the only one who can make a difference.

In Spring, she falls for Sang, the witch training her. As her magic grows, so do her feelings, until she’s terrified Sang will be the next one she loses.

In Summer, Clara must choose between her power and her happiness, her duty and the people she loves… before she loses Sang, her magic, and thrusts the world into chaos.

For the Wolf • Hannah F. Whitten • Orbit Books • 15 juin • 448 pages

As the only Second Daughter born in centuries, Red has one purpose-to be sacrificed to the Wolf in the Wood in the hope he’ll return the world’s captured gods.

Red is almost relieved to go. Plagued by a dangerous power she can’t control, at least she knows that in the Wilderwood, she can’t hurt those she loves. Again.

But the legends lie. The Wolf is a man, not a monster. Her magic is a calling, not a curse. And if she doesn’t learn how to use it, the monsters the gods have become will swallow the Wilderwood-and her world-whole.

The Maidens • Alex Michaelides • Celadon Books • 15 juin • 352 pages

Edward Fosca is a murderer. Of this Mariana is certain. But Fosca is untouchable. A handsome and charismatic Greek Tragedy professor at Cambridge University, Fosca is adored by staff and students alike—particularly by the members of a secret society of female students known as The Maidens. 

Mariana Andros is a brilliant but troubled group therapist who becomes fixated on The Maidens when one member, a friend of Mariana’s niece Zoe, is found murdered in Cambridge. 

Mariana, who was once herself a student at the university, quickly suspects that behind the idyllic beauty of the spires and turrets, and beneath the ancient traditions, lies something sinister. And she becomes convinced that, despite his alibi, Edward Fosca is guilty of the murder. But why would the professor target one of his students? And why does he keep returning to the rites of Persephone, the maiden, and her journey to the underworld?

When another body is found, Mariana’s obsession with proving Fosca’s guilt spirals out of control, threatening to destroy her credibility as well as her closest relationships. But Mariana is determined to stop this killer, even if it costs her everything—including her own life.

Elisabeth Thomas • Catherine House (2020)

Catherine House • Elisabeth Thomas • Custom House • Mai 2020 • 320 pages

You are in the house and the house is in the woods.
You are in the house and the house is in you . . .
 

Catherine House is a school of higher learning like no other. Hidden deep in the woods of rural Pennsylvania, this crucible of reformist liberal arts study with its experimental curriculum, wildly selective admissions policy, and formidable endowment, has produced some of the world’s best minds: prize-winning authors, artists, inventors, Supreme Court justices, presidents. For those lucky few selected, tuition, room, and board are free. But acceptance comes with a price. Students are required to give the House three years—summers included—completely removed from the outside world. Family, friends, television, music, even their clothing must be left behind. In return, the school promises its graduates a future of sublime power and prestige, and that they can become anything or anyone they desire.

Among this year’s incoming class is Ines, who expects to trade blurry nights of parties, pills, cruel friends, and dangerous men for rigorous intellectual discipline—only to discover an environment of sanctioned revelry. The school’s enigmatic director, Viktória, encourages the students to explore, to expand their minds, to find themselves and their place within the formidable black iron gates of Catherine. 

For Ines, Catherine is the closest thing to a home she’s ever had, and her serious, timid roommate, Baby, soon becomes an unlikely friend. Yet the House’s strange protocols make this refuge, with its worn velvet and weathered leather, feel increasingly like a gilded prison. And when Baby’s obsessive desire for acceptance ends in tragedy, Ines begins to suspect that the school—in all its shabby splendor, hallowed history, advanced theories, and controlled decadence—might be hiding a dangerous agenda that is connected to a secretive, tightly knit group of students selected to study its most promising and mysterious curriculum. 


Publié en 2020, Catherine House est un roman qui aurait pu réellement me plaire. J’aime les livres qui se déroulent dans des écoles ou pensionnats particuliers. Ce sont des endroits propices pour développer des intrigues et ambiances pleines de mystères. J’ai trouvé ici que l’effet n’atteignait pas son but.

Ce roman m’a ennuyée dès le début et cela ne s’est pas amélioré au fil des pages, malheureusement. Avec ce type de livres, je place tous mes espoirs dans l’ambiance qui doit s’en dégager. L’intrigue peut être moyenne, mais si l’atmosphère est parfaite, elle peut améliorer mon appréciation de l’ouvrage. Pour ce roman, l’ambiance est terne et pas aussi sombre que je l’espérais. L’école renferme certes un secret, mais il se devine rapidement. De plus, l’auteur ne m’a jamais réellement donné envie d’en savoir plus. L’histoire ne m’a pas agrippé.

Les premières pages sont très longues, le lecteur ne sait pas vraiment où l’auteur nous amène, tout en ne créant aucun suspense. Une fois le secret deviné, il n’y a plus de surprise sur le déroulement. Un manque de suspense, plus un rythme très lent, la lecture devient un peu houleuse. Le point principal, le secret que renferme l’école, ne m’a fait l’effet d’une bombe, mais d’un cheveu qui tombe sur la soupe. Il est mal amené. C’est très soudain et il n’y a pas vraiment d’indices pour mettre le lecteur sur une piste et qui aurait pu amener un peu de tension, de mystère. En le commençant, il me faisait quelque peu penser à Never let me go de Kazuo Ishiguro, que j’ai lu il y a quelques années et qui m’avait profondément marqué, mais Catherine House ne lui arrive pas à la cheville. Au final, il me reste comme impression que l’histoire n’est qu’une succession de tout ce que les élèves mangent, boivent et à quelle fréquence ils se retrouvent totalement saouls…

Elisabeth Thomas s’intéresse principalement à Ines Murino, une jeune adolescente au passé trouble, qui a bénéficié d’une seconde chance en intégrant Catherine House. Clairement, j’ai détesté ce personnage. Elle est arrogante, ne se remet jamais en question. Elle se croit souvent supérieure aux autres personnages. Il y a un décalage entre ses actions et ce qu’elle peut parfois penser, certaines choses qu’elle fait et qui sont incompréhensibles. Par exemple, elle a tout fait pour être acceptée dans cette école dont le processus de recrutement est plutôt lourd et long. Pourtant, une fois accepté et dans les locaux, elle ne fait rien pour s’intégrer. Elle ne va pas en cours et ne montre aucune reconnaissance.

Catherine House est une publication qui me faisait très, très envie, mais qui a accumulé les déceptions dès le départ : l’intrigue, le personnage principal, les mystères et l’ambiance. Je m’attendais à mieux en le commençant, car le résumé montrait du potentiel. Il avait tous les ingrédients que j’aimais : un pensionnat, un secret, des dangers…

Karen McManus • The Cousins (2020)

The Cousins • Karen McManus • 2020 • Delacorte Press • 337 pages

Milly, Aubrey, and Jonah Story are cousins, but they barely know each another, and they’ve never even met their grandmother. Rich and reclusive, she disinherited their parents before they were born. So when they each receive a letter inviting them to work at her island resort for the summer, they’re surprised… and curious.

Their parents are all clear on one point—not going is not an option. This could be the opportunity to get back into Grandmother’s good graces. But when the cousins arrive on the island, it’s immediately clear that she has different plans for them. And the longer they stay, the more they realize how mysterious—and dark—their family’s past is.

The entire Story family has secrets. Whatever pulled them apart years ago isn’t over—and this summer, the cousins will learn everything.

Je découvre enfin la plume de Karen McManus avec sa dernière publication, The Cousins, un roman autour d’un secret de famille. L’auteur signe ici un thriller psychologique qui m’a tenu en haleine, malgré quelques défauts.

En commençant ce livre, le lecteur n’a pas connaissance des raisons qui ont poussé la grand-mère a déshérité ses enfants. Eux-mêmes ne le savent pas. Le mystère sera toutefois levé, grâce à l’enquête menée par les petits-enfants. L’intrigue démarre rapidement et en deux chapitres, les principaux éléments sont déjà mis en place. Les cousins sont en route pour le complexe hôtelier de leur grand-mère. L’enquête peut ainsi commencer, car dès qu’ils la rencontrent pour la première fois, quelque chose sonne faux. Pour ma part, cela semblait prometteur : des cachotteries, un rythme rapide…

En effet, les événements s’enchaînent à une cadence soutenue, tout comme les révélations et les retournements de situation. Ils sont relativement nombreux et je ne me suis pas ennuyée une seule seconde avec ce roman. Cependant, c’est à ce niveau que je suis déçue. Tout simplement, à la longue, j’ai trouvé que l’enchaînement devant un peu rocambolesque, too much. Le tout perd le peu de crédibilité qu’il y avait. J’ai continué l’histoire pour connaître le dernier mot de tous ses mystères. Mais même la fin m’a semblé un peu trop tirée par les cheveux.

The Cousins alterne les points de vue des trois cousins : Jonas, Aubrey et Millie. De temps à autre, celui d’Allison, la mère de Millie, s’intercale et donne des pistes sur ce qui s’est passé le dernier été sur l’île avec ses frères. Je n’ai pas vraiment eu de coup de coeur pour l’un ou l’autre des personnages. Je les ai trouvé un brin trop stéréotypés à mon goût. Millie, par exemple, est l’archétype de la jeune fille populaire, sûre de sa beauté et de sa richesse.

The Cousins a été une bonne lecture, mais qui ne me laissera pas un souvenir impérissable. Il est divertissant sur le moment, mais c’est tout. J’en lirai sûrement d’autres de cette écrivaine de temps à autre, ayant une bonne partie de sa bibliographie dans ma liste d’envies.

Elizabeth MacNeal • The Doll Factory (2019)

The Doll Factory • Elizabeth MacNeal • 2019 • Picador • 336 pages

London. 1850. The Great Exhibition is being erected in Hyde Park and among the crowd watching the spectacle two people meet. For Iris, an aspiring artist, it is the encounter of a moment – forgotten seconds later, but for Silas, a collector entranced by the strange and beautiful, that meeting marks a new beginning. 

When Iris is asked to model for pre-Raphaelite artist Louis Frost, she agrees on the condition that he will also teach her to paint. Suddenly her world begins to expand, to become a place of art and love.

But Silas has only thought of one thing since their meeting, and his obsession is darkening…

The Doll Factory est le premier roman de l’écrivaine écossaise, Elizabeth MacNeal dont l’inspiration lui vient d’un essai qu’elle a écrit durant ses études. Ce dernier portait sur la littérature anglaise des années 1850. Sur son site officiel, elle parle aussi de sa fascination pour Lizzie Suddal, muse et compagne de Dante Gabriel Rossetti, pour le Londres de cette époque, bouillonnante d’inspirations et d’ambitions que cristallise l’organisation de la toute première Exposition universelle de 1851. À cette occasion, le Crystal Palace sera construit.

Ce sont autant d’aspects historiques qui se retrouvent dans ce roman, pour mon plus grand bonheur. L’auteur évoque la construction du Crystal Palace, une des premières architectures de verre et d’acier et qui s’inspire des serres. En effet, Joseph Praxton (1803-1865), son concepteur, était avant tout un jardinier. Le roman fourmille de petites anecdotes historiques qui étoffent l’intrigue, la rendent vraisemblable, mais surtout elles donnent au lecteur l’impression de marcher au côté d’Iris dans le Londres de 1850. Une petite anecdote que j’ai adoré retrouver est celle autour des wombats, animaux que les Préraphaélites appréciaient énormément. La rumeur voulait que le wombat de Rossetti soit mort après avoir mangé une boîte de cigares… Rumeur fausse, bien entendu.

Il y a d’autres aspects historiques dans ce roman qui m’ont énormément plu et qui ne tiennent pas seulement à l’Exposition universelle. Il y a surtout la présence centrale des Préraphaélites, mouvement artistique anglais que j’adore et qui est largement abordé dans ce livre (de la place des artistes dans la société par rapport à l’Académie, le rôle important des critiques au XIX siècle qui se développent énormément, le rôle des muses, leurs méthodes de travail…). Il y a également tout un développement sur les conditions de vie et de travail des pauvres, notamment à travers le personnage tellement attachant d’Albie. Les femmes tiennent également un grand rôle dans cette intrigue. Elizabeth MacNeal montre bien la manière dont la femme était perçue à cette époque, la condition qui lui était assignée : épouse et mère ; travailleuse ou prostituée. La volonté de reconnaissance et d’ascension sociale est amplement évoquée avec Silas, un personnage qui fait froid dans le dos.

Cette impression est renforcée par, à la fois, son métier et sa psychologie. Elizabeth MacNeal a fait un excellent travail sur la description des différents personnages, mais pour Silas, je trouve qu’elle a mis un cran au-dessus. Dès sa première apparition, le lecteur sent qu’il y a quelque chose de malsain chez lui. Sa passion pour tout ce qui est morbide, les curiosités, la taxidermie ne joue pas en sa faveur. Je l’ai détesté et, tout au long du roman, j’ai espéré qu’il n’arrive jamais à ses fins, surtout après la révélation de certains secrets le concernant.

C’est à travers ce dernier que la tension psychologique du roman se crée. En le commençant, je ne m’attendais pas à ce qu’il prenne une telle direction. Mais, progressivement, d’un roman historique, The Doll Factory devient un thriller psychologique. Pour un premier roman, Elizabeth MacNeal m’a étonnée par sa maîtrise de la tension, du drame. J’ai retenu mon souffle tout au long des pages, tout en ayant beaucoup d’espoir, de la peur et de la colère. J’ai été prise dans cette intrigue rapidement, prenant à coeur le destin d’Iris.

J’ai beaucoup aimé cette jeune femme courageuse et brillante, elle ose sortir des conventions en suivant ses rêves de devenir une artiste. On peut réellement voir la fascination qu’a exercée Lizzie Suddal sur l’auteur à travers Iris. Elles partagent un certain nombre de points communs. Elles ont toutes les deux étaient découvertes alors qu’elles travaillaient dans des boutiques. Elles sont toutes les deux rousses, une couleur de cheveux qui obsédait les artistes préraphaélites. Elles sont toutes les deux muses et artistes. Cela peut donner quelques pistes de réflexion sur le destin d’Iris, même si je ne l’espère pas pour elle. Lizzie Suddal apparaît d’ailleurs dans le roman, aux côtés de Rossetti et Millais.

The Doll Factory a presque été un coup de coeur. Il y a quelques petits coups de mou parfois, entre l’introduction des personnages, puis quand l’aspect thriller psychologique commence réellement. Cependant, c’est vraiment un excellent roman, avec une écriture de qualité. Je serai curieuse de lire d’autres ouvrages de l’auteur et je recommande ce premier roman étonnant. Tout au long de ma lecture, je me suis dit que c’est le genre d’histoire que j’aimerais beaucoup voir adapter au cinéma ou en série.

Sorties VO • Décembre 2020

The Last Resort Susi Holliday • 1 décembre • Thomas & Mercer • 300 pages

When Amelia is invited to an all-expenses-paid retreat on a private island, the mysterious offer is too good to refuse. Along with six other strangers, she’s told they’re here to test a brand-new product for Timeo Technologies. But the guests’ excitement soon turns to terror when the real reason for their summons becomes clear.

Each guest has a guilty secret. And when they’re all forced to wear a memory-tracking device that reveals their dark and shameful deeds to their fellow guests, there’s no hiding from the past. This is no luxury retreat—it’s a trap they can’t get out of.

As the clock counts down to the lavish end-of-day party they’ve been promised, injuries and in-fighting split the group. But with no escape from the island—or the other guests’ most shocking secrets—Amelia begins to suspect that her only hope for survival is to be the last one standing. Can she confront her own dark past to uncover the truth—before it’s too late to get out?

Marion Lane and the Midnight Murder • T.A. Willberg • 29 décembre • Park Row • 336 pages

Marion Lane and the Midnight Murder plunges readers into the heart of London, to the secret tunnels that exist far beneath the city streets. There, a mysterious group of detectives recruited for Miss Brickett’s Investigations & Inquiries use their cunning and gadgets to solve crimes that have stumped Scotland Yard.

Late one night in April 1958, a filing assistant for Miss Brickett’s named Michelle White receives a letter warning her that a heinous act is about to occur. She goes to investigate but finds the room empty. At the stroke of midnight, she is murdered by a killer she can’t see—her death the only sign she wasn’t alone. It becomes chillingly clear that the person responsible must also work for Miss Brickett’s, making everyone a suspect.

Almost unwillingly, Marion Lane, a first-year Inquirer-in-training, finds herself being drawn ever deeper into the investigation. When her friend and mentor is framed for the crime, to clear his name she must sort through the hidden alliances at Miss Brickett’s and secrets dating back to WWII. Masterful, clever and deliciously suspenseful, Marion Lane and the Midnight Murder is a fresh take on the Agatha Christie—style locked-room mystery with an exciting new heroine detective at the helm. 

The Cousins • Karen McManus • 1 décembre • Delacorte Press • 336 pages

Milly, Aubrey, and Jonah Story are cousins, but they barely know each another, and they’ve never even met their grandmother. Rich and reclusive, she disinherited their parents before they were born. So when they each receive a letter inviting them to work at her island resort for the summer, they’re surprised . . . and curious.

Their parents are all clear on one point–not going is not an option. This could be the opportunity to get back into Grandmother’s good graces. But when the cousins arrive on the island, it’s immediately clear that she has different plans for them. And the longer they stay, the more they realize how mysterious–and dark–their family’s past is.

The entire Story family has secrets. Whatever pulled them apart years ago isn’t over–and this summer, the cousins will learn everything.

The Chanel Sisters • Judithe Little • 29 décembre • Graydon House • 400 pages

Antoinette and Gabrielle “Coco” Chanel know they’re destined for something better. Abandoned by their family years before, they’ve grown up under the guidance of pious nuns preparing them for simple lives as the wives of tradesmen or shopkeepers. At night, their secret stash of romantic novels and magazine cutouts beneath the floorboards are all they have to keep their dreams of the future alive.

The walls of the convent can’t shield them forever, and when they’re finally of age, the Chanel sisters set out together with a fierce determination to prove themselves worthy to a society that has never accepted them. Their journey propels them out of poverty and to the stylish cafés of Moulins, the dazzling performance halls of Vichy—and to a small hat shop on the rue Cambon in Paris, where a business takes hold and expands to the glamorous French resort towns. But when World War I breaks out, their lives are irrevocably changed, and the sisters must gather the courage to fashion their own places in the world, even if apart from each other.

The Mystery of Mrs. Christie • Marie Benedict • 29 décembre • Sourcebooks Landmarks • 288 pages

In December 1926, Agatha Christie goes missing. Investigators find her empty car on the edge of a deep, gloomy pond, the only clues some tire tracks nearby and a fur coat left in the car—strange for a frigid night. Her husband and daughter have no knowledge of her whereabouts, and England unleashes an unprecedented manhunt to find the up-and-coming mystery author. Eleven days later, she reappears, just as mysteriously as she disappeared, claiming amnesia and providing no explanations for her time away. 

The puzzle of those missing eleven days has persisted. With her trademark exploration into the shadows of history, acclaimed author Marie Benedict brings us into the world of Agatha Christie, imagining why such a brilliant woman would find herself at the center of such a murky story. 

The Berlin Girl • Mandy Robotham • 8 décembre • Avon • 400 pages

Berlin, 1938: It’s the height of summer, and Germany is on the brink of war. When fledgling reporter Georgie Young is posted to Berlin, alongside fellow Londoner Max Spender, she knows they are entering the eye of the storm.

Arriving to a city swathed in red flags and crawling with Nazis, Georgie feels helpless, witnessing innocent people being torn from their homes. As tensions rise, she realises she and Max have to act – even if it means putting their lives on the line.

But when she digs deeper, Georgie begins to uncover the unspeakable truth about Hitler’s Germany – and the pair are pulled into a world darker than she could ever have imagined…

The Berlin Shadow: Living with the Ghosts of the Kindertransport • Jonathan Lichtenstein •15 décembre • Brown Spark • 320 pages

In 1939, Jonathan Lichtenstein’s father Hans escaped Nazi-occupied Berlin as a child refugee on the Kindertransport. Almost every member of his family died after Kristallnacht, and, upon arriving in England to make his way in the world alone, Hans turned his back on his German Jewish culture.

Growing up in post-war rural Wales where the conflict was never spoken of, Jonathan and his siblings were at a loss to understand their father’s relentless drive and sometimes eccentric behavior. As Hans enters old age, he and Jonathan set out to retrace his journey back to Berlin.