Top 5 Wednesday • Back to school

Le thème de cette semaine s’intitule Back to school. Le sens peut être très large, puisque sont acceptés les livres lus durant les études ou ceux parlant d’écoles, de lycées, d’universités… C’est plutôt dans ce sens-là que j’ai axé ma sélection. Les romans que je vous propose ont tous été lus.

The Assignment • Liza Wiemer

SENIOR YEAR. When an assignment given by a favorite teacher instructs a group of students to argue for the Final Solution, a euphemism used to describe the Nazi plan for the genocide of the Jewish people, Logan March and Cade Crawford are horrified. Their teacher cannot seriously expect anyone to complete an assignment that fuels intolerance and discrimination. Logan and Cade decide they must take a stand. As the school administration addressed the teens’ refusal to participate in the appalling debate, the student body, their parents, and the larger community are forced to face the issue as well. The situation explodes, and acrimony and anger result. What does it take for tolerance, justice, and love to prevail?

They never learn • Layne Fargo

Scarlett Clark is an exceptional English professor. But she’s even better at getting away with murder.

Every year, she searches for the worst man at Gorman University and plots his well-deserved demise. Thanks to her meticulous planning, she’s avoided drawing attention to herself—but as she’s preparing for her biggest kill yet, the school starts probing into the growing body count on campus. Determined to keep her enemies close, Scarlett insinuates herself into the investigation and charms the woman in charge, Dr. Mina Pierce. Everything’s going according to her master plan…until she loses control with her latest victim, putting her secret life at risk of exposure.

Meanwhile, Gorman student Carly Schiller is just trying to survive her freshman year. Finally free of her emotionally abusive father, all Carly wants is to focus on her studies and fade into the background. Her new roommate has other ideas. Allison Hadley is cool and confident—everything Carly wishes she could be—and the two girls quickly form an intense friendship. So when Allison is sexually assaulted at a party, Carly becomes obsessed with making the attacker pay…and turning her fantasies about revenge into a reality.

In my dreams I hold a knife • Ashley Winstead

A college reunion turns dark and deadly in this chilling and propulsive suspense novel about six friends, one unsolved murder, and the dark secrets they’ve been hiding from each other—and themselves—for a decade.

Ten years after graduation, Jessica Miller has planned her triumphant return to southern, elite Duquette University, down to the envious whispers that are sure to follow in her wake. Everyone is going to see the girl she wants them to see—confident, beautiful, indifferent—not the girl she was when she left campus, back when Heather’s murder fractured everything, including the tight bond linking the six friends she’d been closest to since freshman year. Ten years ago, everything fell apart, including the dreams she worked for her whole life—and her relationship with the one person she wasn’t supposed to love.

But not everyone is ready to move on. Not everyone left Duquette ten years ago, and not everyone can let Heather’s murder go unsolved. Someone is determined to trap the real killer, to make the guilty pay. When the six friends are reunited, they will be forced to confront what happened that night—and the years’ worth of secrets each of them would do anything to keep hidden.

Métamorphoses, Vita Nostra • Marina et Sergueï Diatchenko

Vita nostra brevis est, brevi finietur…
« Notre vie est brève, elle finira bientôt… »

C’est dans le bourg paumé de Torpa que Sacha entonnera l’hymne des étudiants, à l’« Institut des technologies spéciales ». Pour y apprendre quoi ? Allez savoir. Dans quel but et en vue de quelle carrière ? Mystère encore. Il faut dire que son inscription ne relève pas exactement d’un choix : on la lui a imposée… Comment s’étonner dès lors de l’apparente absurdité de l’enseignement, de l’arbitraire despotisme des professeurs et de l’inquiétante bizarrerie des étudiants ?

A-t-on affaire, avec Vita nostra, à un roman d’initiation à la magie ? Oui et non. On évoque irrésistiblement la saga d’Harry Potter et plus encore Les Magiciens de Lev Grossman. Mêmes jeunes esprits en formation, même apprentissage semé d’obstacles. Mais c’est sur une autre terre et dans une autre culture, slaves celles-là, que reposent les fondations d’un livre qui nous rappellera que le Verbe se veut à l’origine du monde. Les lecteurs de fantasy occidentale saturés d’aspirations à l’héroïsme tous azimuts en seront tourneboulés.

My dark Vanessa • Kate Elizabeth Russell

2000. Bright, ambitious, and yearning for adulthood, fifteen-year-old Vanessa Wye becomes entangled in an affair with Jacob Strane, her magnetic and guileful forty-two-year-old English teacher.

2017. Amid the rising wave of allegations against powerful men, a reckoning is coming due. Strane has been accused of sexual abuse by a former student, who reaches out to Vanessa, and now Vanessa suddenly finds herself facing an impossible choice: remain silent, firm in the belief that her teenage self willingly engaged in this relationship, or redefine herself and the events of her past. But how can Vanessa reject her first love, the man who fundamentally transformed her and has been a persistent presence in her life? Is it possible that the man she loved as a teenager—and who professed to worship only her—may be far different from what she has always believed?

Alternating between Vanessa’s present and her past, My Dark Vanessa juxtaposes memory and trauma with the breathless excitement of a teenage girl discovering the power her own body can wield. Thought-provoking and impossible to put down, this is a masterful portrayal of troubled adolescence and its repercussions that raises vital questions about agency, consent, complicity, and victimhood. Written with the haunting intimacy of The Girls and the creeping intensity of RoomMy Dark Vanessa is an era-defining novel that brilliantly captures and reflects the shifting cultural mores transforming our relationships and society itself. 

Top 5 Wednesday • Debut Novels

Le thème de cette semaine met en avant le premier roman publié d’un auteur. Quels sont mes cinq préférés ? J’ai essayé de me le limiter à ceux lus depuis le début d’année.

The Lost Apothecary • Sarah Penner

Rule #1: The poison must never be used to harm another woman.

Rule #2: The names of the murderer and her victim must be recorded in the apothecary’s register.

One cold February evening in 1791, at the back of a dark London alley in a hidden apothecary shop, Nella awaits her newest customer. Once a respected healer, Nella now uses her knowledge for a darker purpose—selling well-disguised poisons to desperate women who would kill to be free of the men in their lives. But when her new patron turns out to be a precocious twelve-year-old named Eliza Fanning, an unexpected friendship sets in motion a string of events that jeopardizes Nella’s world and threatens to expose the many women whose names are written in her register.

In present-day London, aspiring historian Caroline Parcewell spends her tenth wedding anniversary alone, reeling from the discovery of her husband’s infidelity. When she finds an old apothecary vial near the river Thames, she can’t resist investigating, only to realize she’s found a link to the unsolved “apothecary murders” that haunted London over two centuries ago. As she deepens her search, Caroline’s life collides with Nella’s and Eliza’s in a stunning twist of fate—and not everyone will survive.

The lights of Prague • Nicole Jarvis

In the quiet streets of Prague all manner of otherworldly creatures lurk in the shadows. Unbeknownst to its citizens, their only hope against the tide of predators are the dauntless lamplighters – a secret elite of monster hunters whose light staves off the darkness each night. Domek Myska leads a life teeming with fraught encounters with the worst kind of evil: pijavice, bloodthirsty and soulless vampiric creatures. Despite this, Domek find solace in his moments spent in the company of his friend, the clever and beautiful Lady Ora Fischerová– a widow with secrets of her own.

When Domek finds himself stalked by the spirit of the White Lady – a ghost who haunts the baroque halls of Prague castle – he stumbles across the sentient essence of a will-o’-the-wisp, a mischievous spirit known to lead lost travellers to their death, but who, once captured, are bound to serve the desires of their owners.

After discovering a conspiracy amongst the pijavice that could see them unleash terror on the daylight world, Domek finds himself in a race against those who aim to twist alchemical science for their own dangerous gain.

The lost village • Camilla Sten

Documentary filmmaker Alice Lindstedt has been obsessed with the vanishing residents of the old mining town, dubbed “The Lost Village,” since she was a little girl. In 1959, her grandmother’s entire family disappeared in this mysterious tragedy, and ever since, the unanswered questions surrounding the only two people who were left—a woman stoned to death in the town center and an abandoned newborn—have plagued her. She’s gathered a small crew of friends in the remote village to make a film about what really happened.

But there will be no turning back.

Not long after they’ve set up camp, mysterious things begin to happen. Equipment is destroyed. People go missing. As doubt breeds fear and their very minds begin to crack, one thing becomes startlingly clear to Alice:

They are not alone. They’re looking for the truth… But what if it finds them first?

The Miniaturist • Jesse Burton

On a brisk autumn day in 1686, eighteen-year-old Nella Oortman arrives in Amsterdam to begin a new life as the wife of illustrious merchant trader Johannes Brandt. But her new home, while splendorous, is not welcoming. Johannes is kind yet distant, always locked in his study or at his warehouse office—leaving Nella alone with his sister, the sharp-tongued and forbidding Marin.

Lien vers l’article

The Year of the Witching • Alexis Henderson

A young woman living in a rigid, puritanical society discovers dark powers within herself in this stunning, feminist fantasy debut.

In the lands of Bethel, where the Prophet’s word is law, Immanuelle Moore’s very existence is blasphemy. Her mother’s union with an outsider of a different race cast her once-proud family into disgrace, so Immanuelle does her best to worship the Father, follow Holy Protocol, and lead a life of submission, devotion, and absolute conformity, like all the other women in the settlement.

But a mishap lures her into the forbidden Darkwood surrounding Bethel, where the first prophet once chased and killed four powerful witches. Their spirits are still lurking there, and they bestow a gift on Immanuelle: the journal of her dead mother, who Immanuelle is shocked to learn once sought sanctuary in the wood.

Fascinated by the secrets in the diary, Immanuelle finds herself struggling to understand how her mother could have consorted with the witches. But when she begins to learn grim truths about the Church and its history, she realizes the true threat to Bethel is its own darkness. And she starts to understand that if Bethel is to change, it must begin with her. 

Top 5 Wednesday • Underrated authors

Le thème de cette semaine met en avant les auteurs que l’on pense « sous-côté » ou qui méritent plus d’attention. Pour créer ce top 5, qui ne comprend en réalité que quatre auteurs, je me base surtout sur les blogs que j’ai l’habitude de lire.

Christina Henry

Elle revient systématiquement sur mon blog, car je lis toujours ses nouvelles publications dès leurs sorties. Ce sont souvent des réécritures de contes ou autour d’un mythe comme Alice au Pays des Merveilles, le Yéti ou Peter Pan. Ses univers sont malsains, sombres et torturés. Ils peuvent mettre mal à l’aise, mais j’adore ça. Je n’ai pour l’instant jamais été déçue par ses romans et je les recommande chaudement. J’avais d’ailleurs écrit un article à son sujet. [lien]

Philip Kerr

Il est peut-être un peu plus connu que Christina Henry. C’est aussi un des auteurs les plus représentés dans mes bibliothèques. Sa série Bernie Gunther m’a tenu en haleine pendant de longues années. Je me suis énormément attachée à ce personnage et son humour noir, cynique. Le contexte historique est parfaitement documenté. J’en avais aussi parlé sur le blog il y a quelques années. [lien]

Émile Zola

Je redécouvre cet auteur depuis quelques mois. Alors qu’il était ma bête noire de mes années lycée, je l’apprécie de plus en plus. J’avance doucement mais sûrement dans les Rougon-Macquart, mais, pour le moment, rares sont les tomes que je n’ai pas apprécié.

Ben Aaronovitch

Il signe aussi une des séries que j’adore, les Peter Grant. Elle mêle magie, humour anglais et références à la pop culture britannique à coup de Sherlock Holmes, Doctor Who ou Harry Potter. Je me régale à chaque tome, et il m’en reste que quelques uns avant de l’avoir définitivement terminée… Pour mon plus grand regret, car c’est le type de livres que j’adore lire un cas de coup de mou.

Top 5 Wednesday • Halfway there!

Je reviens avec le Top 5 Wednesday (et un article en retard). Les thèmes de Juillet ne m’ont guère inspiré, contrairement à ceux d’août. Le premier est Halway there! Il consiste à présenter les cinq meilleurs livres publiés depuis le début d’année. Je ne les ai pas forcément rangés dans un ordre d’appréciation.

Don’t tell a soul – Kristen Miller

Goodreads

J’ai adoré ce roman d’un bout à l’autre. L’ambiance est parfaite, bien dosée avec le suspens. Ce dernier est présent et parfaitement maîtrisé. Impossible de mettre le livre de côté pendant quelques secondes.

Sistersong • Lucy Holland

Goodreads

Un très bon roman sur trois soeurs très différentes. Des jalousies, des drames, le tout sous fond de Bretagne historique et mythique… J’ai vraiment beaucoup aimé et j’ai vraiment envie de lire d’autres ouvrages dans cette veine.

The lost village • Camilla Sten

Goodreads

Un thriller psychologique avec énormément de suspens et de tension. Il est haletant et un vrai page-turner. Il est juste dommage que la fin ne soit pas à la hauteur de mes espérances.

Near the bone • Christina Henry

Goodreads

Christina Henry est une de mes auteurs préférés et chacune de ses nouvelle publications finies entre mes mains. J’avais très envie de découvrir celui-ci et je ne suis pas déçue. Encore un livre avec une ambiance sombre, des passages pas toujours facile. Un autre mythe est exploré.

The Lights of Prague • Nicole Jarvis

Goodreads

Je découvre une nouvelle auteur avec ce roman. Prague est une ville que je rêve de pouvoir visiter, et encore plus après cette lecture. J’ai adoré l’univers, l’ambiance et les personnages. Je serai bien partante pour un deuxième tome.

Top 5 Wednesday • Long series

Le thème du jour propose de parler de nos séries littéraires préférées. Elles doivent contenir plus de trois tomes, pour être considérée comme une série longue.

Peter Grant – Ben Aaronovitch

Probationary Constable Peter Grant dreams of being a detective in London’s Metropolitan Police. Too bad his superior plans to assign him to the Case Progression Unit, where the biggest threat he’ll face is a paper cut. But Peter’s prospects change in the aftermath of a puzzling murder, when he gains exclusive information from an eyewitness who happens to be a ghost. Peter’s ability to speak with the lingering dead brings him to the attention of Detective Chief Inspector Thomas Nightingale, who investigates crimes involving magic and other manifestations of the uncanny. Now, as a wave of brutal and bizarre murders engulfs the city, Peter is plunged into a world where gods and goddesses mingle with mortals and a long-dead evil is making a comeback on a rising tide of magic.

C’est une série que j’aime énormément et qui comprend une dizaine de tomes. J’en ai déjà lu six et je suis en train de la terminer, doucement mais sûrement. J’adore cette histoire qui devient de plus en plus sombre au fur et à mesure et qui contient de nombreuses références à la pop culture anglaise et des touches d’humour anglais divines.

Les Rougon-Macquart – Émile Zola

Dans la petite ville provençale de Plassans, au lendemain du coup d’État d’où va naître le Second Empire, deux adolescents, Miette et Silvère, se mêlent aux insurgés. Leur histoire d’amour comme le soulèvement des républicains traversent le roman, mais au-delà d’eux, c’est aussi la naissance d’une famille qui se trouve évoquée : les Rougon en même temps que les Macquart dont la double lignée, légitime et bâtarde, descend de la grand-mère de Silvère, Tante Dide. Et entre Pierre Rougon et son demi-frère Antoine Macquart, la lutte rapidement va s’ouvrir. Premier roman de la longue série des Rougon-Macquart, La Fortune des Rougon que Zola fait paraître en 1871 est bien le roman des origines. Au moment où s’installe le régime impérial que l’écrivain pourfend, c’est ici que commence la patiente conquête du pouvoir et de l’argent, une lente ascension familiale qui doit faire oublier les commencements sordides, dans la misère et dans le crime.

En une vingtaine de tomes, Émile Zola évoque une famille et ses descendants dans la France du Second Empire. J’en suis quasiment à la moitié et, de manière générale, j’ai aimé chacun des tomes pour des raisons différentes.

Soleil Noir – Éric Giacometti et Jacques Ravenne

Dans une Europe au bord de l’abîme, une organisation nazie, l’Ahnenerbe, pille des lieux sacrés à travers le monde. Ils cherchent à amasser des trésors aux pouvoirs obscurs destinés à établir le règne millénaire du Troisième Reich. Son maître, Himmler, envoie des SS fouiller un sanctuaire tibétain dans une vallée oubliée de l’Himalaya. Il se rend lui-même en Espagne, dans un monastère, pour chercher un tableau énigmatique. De quelle puissance ancienne les nazis croient-ils détenir la clé ? À Londres, Churchill découvre que la guerre contre l’Allemagne sera aussi la guerre spirituelle de la lumière contre l’occulte. Ce livre est le premier tome d’une saga où l’histoire occulte fait se rencontrer les acteurs majeurs de la Seconde Guerre mondiale et des personnages aux destins d’exception : Tristan, le trafiquant d’art au passé trouble, Erika, une archéologue allemande, Laure, l’héritière des Cathares…

Le quatrième tome vient de sortir et j’ai déjà lu les trois premiers. C’est une série prenante autour de reliques, d’archéologie, d’aventures…

Erica Falck – Camilla Läckberg

Erica Falck, trente-cinq ans, auteur de biographies installée dans une petite ville paisible de la côte ouest suédoise, découvre le cadavre aux poignets tailladés d’une amie d’enfance, Alexandra Wijkner, nue dans une baignoire d’eau gelée. Impliquée malgré elle dans l’enquête (à moins qu’une certaine tendance naturelle à fouiller la vie des autres ne soit ici à l’œuvre), Erica se convainc très vite qu’il ne s’agit pas d’un suicide. Sur ce point – et sur beaucoup d’autres -, l’inspecteur Patrik Hedström, amoureux transi, la rejoint.

À la conquête de la vérité, stimulée par un amour naissant, Erica, enquêtrice au foyer façon Desperate Housewives, plonge clans les strates d’une petite société provinciale qu’elle croyait bien connaître et découvre ses secrets, d’autant plus sombres que sera bientôt trouvé le corps d’un peintre clochard – autre mise en scène de suicide.

J’ai le troisième et quatrième tomes dans ma pile à lire et il m’en reste encore une dizaine avant de terminer la série. J’ai beaucoup aimé les deux premiers et j’ai véritablement envie de la continuer.

Bernie Gunther – Philip Kerr

Publiés pour la première fois dans les années 1989-1991, L’été de cristal, La pâle figure et Un requiem allemand évoquent l’ambiance du Ille Reich en 1936 et 1938, et ses décombres en 1947 Ils ont pour héros Bernie Gunther, ex-commissaire de la police berlinoise devenu détective privé. Désabusé et courageux, perspicace et insolent, Bernie est à l’Allemagne nazie ce que Phil Marlowe était à la Californie de la fin des années 30 : un homme solitaire témoin de la cupidité et de la cruauté humaines, qui nous tend le miroir d’un lieu et d’une époque. Des rues de Berlin  » nettoyées  » pour offrir une image idyllique aux visiteurs des Jeux olympiques, à celles de Vienne la corrompue, théâtre après la guerre d’un ballet de tractations pour le moins démoralisant, Bernie va enquêter au milieu d’actrices et de prostituées, de psychiatres et de banquiers, de producteurs de cinéma et de publicitaires. Mais là où la Trilogie se démarque d’un film noir hollywoodien, c’est que les rôles principaux y sont tenus par des vedettes en chair et en os : Heydrich, Himmler et Goering…

Une de mes séries préférées. Plus d’une dizaine de tomes, un personnage attachant et une série allant des années 20 jusqu’aux années 60. Chaque livre est très largement documenté. Il me manque le dernier tome à découvrir.

Top 5 Wednesday • Recent purchases

Thème : Recent purchases

Voilà un autre thème qui m’inspire pour ce mois-ci. La question posée est quels sont les cinq livres que j’ai récemment acheté et que je suis excitée à l’idée de lire ou que j’ai aimé. Ça tombe bien, car j’ai refait mon stock le mois dernier en allant dans mes librairies strasbourgeoises préférées et en passant dans plusieurs Emmaüs. Certains ont déjà été lus, mais j’ai surtout envie de parler de ceux qui ne le sont pas encore, mais qui me tentent énormément.

La famille Karnovski – Israel Joshua Singer

La famille Karnovski retrace le destin de trois générations d’une famille juive qui décide de quitter la Pologne pour s’installer en Allemagne à l’aube de la Seconde Guerre mondiale. Comment Jegor, fils d’un père juif et d’une mère aryenne, trouvera-t-il sa place dans un monde où la montée du nazisme est imminente?

Publié en 1943 alors que les nazis massacrent les communautés juives en Europe, le roman d’Israël Joshua Singer est hanté par ces tragiques circonstances et par la volonté de démêler le destin complexe de son peuple.

En 2021, j’avais très envie de découvrir la littérature israélienne que je ne connais absolument pas. J’ouvre le bal avec cette saga familiale, adorant ce genre de récits en temps normal. Il me tarde de le lire et il ne restera pas très longtemps dans ma PAL.

Sistersong – Lucy Holland

535 AD. In the ancient kingdom of Dumnonia, King Cador’s children inherit a fragmented land abandoned by the Romans.

Riva, scarred in a terrible fire, fears she will never heal.
Keyne battles to be seen as the king’s son, when born a daughter.
And Sinne, the spoiled youngest girl, yearns for romance.

All three fear a life of confinement within the walls of the hold – a last bastion of strength against the invading Saxons. But change comes on the day ash falls from the sky, bringing Myrddhin, meddler and magician, and Tristan, a warrior whose secrets will tear the siblings apart. Riva, Keyne and Sinne must take fate into their own hands, or risk being tangled in a story they could never have imagined; one of treachery, love and ultimately, murder. It’s a story that will shape the destiny of Britain.

Je l’avais déjà remarqué et il était présent dans un de mes articles sur les sorties VO. Cette histoire m’intrigue énormément et je suis totalement fan de cette couverture, de cette Bretagne magique et mythique. Je triche un peu, mais je suis déjà plongée dedans et j’en ai lu la moitié. Intriguant et, pour le moment, j’aime beaucoup.

Sumerki – Dmitry Glukhovsky

Quand Dmitry Alexeïevitch, traducteur désargenté, insiste auprès de son agence pour obtenir un nouveau contrat, il ne se doute pas que sa vie en sera bouleversée. Le traducteur en charge du premier chapitre ne donnant plus de nouvelles, c’est un étrange texte qui lui échoit : le récit d’une expédition dans les forêts inexplorées du Yucatán au XVIe siècle, armée par le prêtre franciscain Diego de Landa. Et les chapitres lui en sont remis au compte-gouttes par un mystérieux commanditaire. 

Aussi, quand l’employé de l’agence est sauvagement assassiné et que les périls relatés dans le document s’immiscent dans son quotidien, Dmitry Alexeïevitch prend peur. Dans les ombres du passé, les dieux et les démons mayas se sont-ils acharnés à protéger un savoir interdit ? A moins, bien entendu, que le manuscrit espagnol ne lui ait fait perdre la raison. Alors que le monde autour de lui est ravagé par des ouragans, des séismes et des tsunamis, le temps est compté pour découvrir la vérité.

Un auteur qui m’a largement été recommandé, surtout pour sa série Métro. Cependant, n’ayant pas envie de me lancer dans une nouvelle série alors que j’essaie d’en terminer un maximum, j’ai préféré choisir ce titre qui semble plus être un thriller ésotérique, ma marotte du moment.

Richard Oppenheimer, La vengeance des cendres – Harald Gilbers

Berlin, hiver 1946, le plus froid que la capitale ait connu au XXe siècle. La guerre est certes finie mais l’Allemagne commence à peine à panser ses plaies, et les Berlinois manquent de tout, surtout de nourriture. Dans cette atmosphère très tendue, des corps mutilés font mystérieusement surface aux quatre coins de la ville. Chacun a la peau couverte de mots écrits à l’encre, et une liste de noms inconnus fourrée dans la bouche. Le commissaire Oppenheimer est alors mobilisé pour mener l’enquête et découvre vite un point commun entre ces morts : ils avaient tous collaboré avec le régime nazi. À Oppenheimer de parvenir à retracer le passé du tueur, et à anticiper ses prochains meurtres.

Déjà le quatrième tome de cette série que j’aime beaucoup. Il me tardait de connaître la suite des aventures de Richard Oppenheimer. Le cinquième est sorti récemment en grand format.

La Sorcière – Jules Michelet

Michelet sait prêter sa voix aux parias du passé, à ceux qui n’ont pas eu d’histoire. À travers les siècles la femme tient-elle donc toujours le même rôle, celui de la mal aimée ? En embrassant d’un seul regard toute l’étendue du Moyen Âge, de la Renaissance et du Grand Siècle, Michelet discerne pour la première fois la suite rigoureuse d’une tragédie dont l’héroïne serait une femme à la fois révérée et persécutée : la sorcière.

La figure de la sorcière me fascine. J’avais adoré l’essai de Mona Chollet, Sorcières ! La puissance invaincue des femmes, que je recommande chaudement. J’avais très envie de découvrir celui de Michelet, qui date certes un peu, car il est publié pour la première fois en 1862, mais qui a fait autorité pendant longtemps. La recherche a depuis évolué sur le sujet.

Top 5 Wednesday #2 • Backlist Book

Thème : Backlist Book

Le premier thème du mois de juin concerne les livres qui ont été publiés il y a un ou plus, mais qui n’ont pas encore été lu et/ou achetés. Voici mes cinq livres prioritaires en ce moment.

Les thèmes du mois peuvent être trouvés ici.


1. The Poppy & the Rose – Ashlee Cowles

1912: Ava Knight, a teen heiress, boards the Titanic to escape the shadow of her unstable mother and to fulfill her dream of becoming a photographer in New York. During the journey she meets three people who will change her life: a handsome sailor, a soldier in the secret Black Hand society that will trigger World War I, and a woman with clairvoyant abilities. When disaster strikes the ship, family betrayals come to light.

2010: When Taylor Romano arrives in Oxford for a summer journalism program, something feels off. Not only is she greeted by a young, Rolls Royce-driving chauffeur, but he invites her to tea with Lady Mae Knight of Meadowbrook Manor, an old house with a cursed history going back to the days of Henry VIII. Lady Knight seems to know a strange amount about Taylor and her family problems, but before Taylor can learn more, the elderly woman dies, leaving as the only clue an old diary. With the help of the diary, a brooding chauffeur, and some historical sleuthing, Taylor must uncover the link between Ava’s past and her own….

Je suis une grande lectrice de romans historiques. Celui-ci me tente énormément, car il est plutôt rare que je lise autour du Titanic, pourtant un événement qui m’intéresse.

2. Mercy House – Alena Dillon

In the Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood of Brooklyn stands a century-old row house presided over by renegade, silver-haired Sister Evelyn. Gruff and indomitable on the surface, warm and wry underneath, Evelyn and her fellow sisters makes Mercy House a safe haven for the abused and abandoned.

Women like Lucia, who arrives in the dead of night; Mei-Li, the Chinese and Russian house veteran; Desiree, a loud and proud prostitute; Esther, a Haitian immigrant and aspiring collegiate; and Katrina, knitter of lumpy scarves… all of them know what it’s like to be broken by men.

Little daunts Evelyn, until she receives word that Bishop Robert Hawkins is coming to investigate Mercy House and the nuns, whose secret efforts to help the women in ways forbidden by the Church may be uncovered. But Evelyn has secrets too, dark enough to threaten everything she has built.

Evelyn will do anything to protect Mercy House and the vibrant, diverse women it serves—confront gang members, challenge her beliefs, even face her past. As she fights to defend all that she loves, she discovers the extraordinary power of mercy and the grace it grants, not just to those who receive it, but to those strong enough to bestow it.

J’aime les histoires où la maison, demeure… prend une place importante. À cela s’ajoute le destin de femmes hors du commun et que tout semble opposé pour sauver leur refuge. Je suis impatiente de pouvoir le découvrir.

3. Daughter of the Reich – Louise Fein

As the dutiful daughter of a high-ranking Nazi officer, Hetty Heinrich is keen to play her part in the glorious new Thousand Year Reich. But she never imagines that all she believes and knows about her world will come into stark conflict when she encounters Walter, a Jewish friend from the past, who stirs dangerous feelings in her. Confused and conflicted, Hetty doesn’t know whom she can trust and where she can turn to, especially when she discovers that someone has been watching her.

Realizing she is taking a huge risk—but unable to resist the intense attraction she has for Walter—she embarks on a secret love affair with him. Together, they dream about when the war will be over and plan for their future. But as the rising tide of anti-Semitism threatens to engulf them, Hetty and Walter will be forced to take extreme measures.

Il doit sortir prochainement en français. Le résumé m’a tout de suite plu, car il me rappelle les Mandy Robotham que j’aime beaucoup. Je l’avais déjà mis en avant dans un article sur les sorties en anglais qui me tentent énormément, il y a un an. Depuis, il traîne dans ma wish-list et il n’a toujours pas été acheté et lu. Sûrement un de mes prochains achats avec le prochain.

4. The Ratline – Philippe Sands

As Governor of Galicia, SS Brigadeführer Otto Freiherr von Wächter presided over an authority on whose territory hundreds of thousands of Jews and Poles were killed, including the family of the author’s grandfather. By the time the war ended in May 1945, he was indicted for ‘mass murder’. Hunted by the Soviets, the Americans, the Poles and the British, as well as groups of Jews, Wächter went on the run. He spent three years hiding in the Austrian Alps, assisted by his wife Charlotte, before making his way to Rome where he was helped by a Vatican bishop. He remained there for three months. While preparing to travel to Argentina on the ‘ratline’ he died unexpectedly, in July 1949, a few days after spending a weekend with an ‘old comrade’.

In The Ratline Philippe Sands offers a unique account of the daily life of a senior Nazi and fugitive, and of his wife. Drawing on a remarkable archive of family letters and diaries, he unveils a fascinating insight into life before and during the war, on the run, in Rome, and into the Cold War. Eventually the door is unlocked to a mystery that haunts Wächter’s youngest son, who continues to believe his father was a good man – what happened to Otto Wächter, and how did he die?

J’ai beaucoup aimé son premier essai, East West Street, sur le dévéloppement des notions de génocide, crimes contre l’humanité. Il retourne sur ce terrain fertile de la Seconde Guerre mondiale en parlant du réseau de fuite nazi. Je connais cet aspect du conflit, mais sans être réellement rentrée dans les détails. Cela fait un an qu’il est sorti et je ne l’ai toujours pas acheté, mais prochainement.

5. Hamnet – Maggie O’Farrell

Warwickshire in the 1580s. Agnes is a woman as feared as she is sought after for her unusual gifts. She settles with her husband in Henley street, Stratford, and has three children: a daughter, Susanna, and then twins, Hamnet and Judith. The boy, Hamnet, dies in 1596, aged eleven. Four years or so later, the husband writes a play called Hamlet.

Ce livre a beaucoup fait parler de lui et il m’intéresse énormément, car il parle de Shakespeare. Ce dernier a toujours été un de mes auteurs préférés. Il est sorti l’année dernière et il a été traduit récemment en français, aux éditions Belfond.

Top 5 Wednesday #1 • Favorite Tropes

J’inaugure un nouveau rendez-vous sur le blog avec le Top 5 Wednesday. Je ne pense pas forcément participer toutes les semaines, mais si le thème me plait et me parle, c’est avec plaisir que j’y réagirai. Les sujets sont annoncés chaque mois sur le groupe Goodreads.

Thème : Favorite Tropes

Avant de me lancer dans cet article, j’ai fait quelques recherches sur ce terme de tropes et sur ce qu’il pouvait signifiait en français. Le meilleur terme que j’ai trouvé est celui de lieux communs. À titre d’exemples, dans les romances, ce seraient les fausses relations amoureuses ou tout ce qui touche à la royauté, les mariages de convenance… Pour le fantastique, ce sont les thématiques d’un•e Élu•e, sauver le monde… Pour mes cinq « lieux communs » préférés, j’ai essayé de tirer un exemple parmi mes plus récentes lectures, ou, du moins, depuis le début d’année.

1. La quête

L’exemple le plus parlant est sans conteste la quête du Graal. Je pense aussi au Seigneur des Anneaux de J.R.R. Tolkien. C’est un lieu commun que j’apprécie beaucoup. Dans mon esprit, il y a toujours le côté partir à l’aventure, aller vers l’inconnu, sortir de sa zone de confort… Le personnage principal va tirer des connaissances, des expériences de son voyage.

Un des derniers livres que j’ai pu lire et qui représente parfaitement cette idée de quête est le troisième tome de la série La Passe-Miroir, La mémoire de Babel. De manière général, la série raconte la quête d’Ophélie et Thorn pour découvrir l’identité de Dieu et l’arrêter.

Thorn a disparu depuis deux ans et demi et Ophélie désespère. Les indices trouvés dans le livre de Farouk et les informations livrées par Dieu mènent toutes à l’arche de Babel, dépositaire des archives mémorielles du monde. Ophélie décide de s’y rendre sous une fausse identité.

2. Une relique ou un artefact puissant•e

S’il est doublé d’une quête, c’est encore mieux ! Je pense que mon amour pour ce genre de lieux communs vient d’Indiana Jones, qui est présenté comme un chasseur de reliques et de trésor (même si, en réalité, il est plus un pilleur de tombes). Certaines d’entre elles ont des propriétés magiques. En littérature, il y a, à nouveau, la quête du Graal, ou les thrillers ésotériques, genres dont je raffole.

Et c’est justement un thriller ésotérique que je vais prendre en exemple avec une des mes toutes dernières lectures. Elle date du début du mois. Il s’agit du troisième tome de la dernière série d’Éric Giacometti et Jacques Ravenne, Soleil noir, La relique du chaos. Les reliques (très particulières pour le coup) ont un caractère mystique et magique.

Juillet 1942. Jamais l’issue du conflit n’a semblé aussi incertaine. Si l’Angleterre a écarté tout risque d’invasion, la Russie de Staline plie sous les coups de boutoir des armées d’Hitler. L’Europe est sur le point de basculer. À travers la quête des Swastikas, la guerre occulte se déchaîne pour tenter de faire pencher la balance. Celui qui s’emparera de l’objet sacré remportera la victoire. Tristan Marcas, agent double au passé obscur, part à la recherche du trésor des Romanov, qui cache, selon le dernier des tsars, l’ultime relique. À Berlin, Moscou et Londres, la course contre la montre est lancée, entraînant dans une spirale vertigineuse Erika, l’archéologue allemande et Laure, la jeune résistante française…

3. Un amour impossible

La faute à Roméo et Juliette de Shakespeare, qui est une de mes pièces préférées au monde. Je prend ce thème ou lieux commun dans un sens très large, car des raisons pour lesquelles un amour peut être impossible sont variées.

Un des derniers livres que j’ai lu et qui peut illustrer ce sujet est Follow me to ground de Sue Rainsford. Il s’agit d’une histoire d’amour entre une sorcière et un mortel qui est vu d’un mauvais oeil par les familles des deux protagonistes.

LIEN VERS L’ARTICLE

Ada and her father, touched by the power to heal illness, live on the edge of a village where they help sick locals—or “Cures”—by cracking open their damaged bodies or temporarily burying them in the reviving, dangerous Ground nearby. Ada, a being both more and less than human, is mostly uninterested in the Cures, until she meets a man named Samson. When they strike up an affair, to the displeasure of her father and Samson’s widowed, pregnant sister, Ada is torn between her old way of life and new possibilities with her lover—and eventually comes to a decision that will forever change Samson, the town, and the Ground itself.

4. Un conflit avec un dieu

C’est un lieu commun qui, pour le coup, brasse très large. Il me rappelle à la fois les récits bibliques, la mythologie grecque… Je pense aussi à des livres fantastiques ou de science-fiction, les réécritures autour des mythes et légendes.

Un livre que j’ai très récemment lu (et apprécié) et dans lequel l’intrigue a pour origine un conflit avec un dieu est Lore d’Alexandra Bracken. Le conflit est entre Zeus et les dieux, les anciens et les nouveaux dieux, les dieux avec les chasseurs… L’auteur s’inspire de la mythologie grecque.

Every seven years, the Agon begins. As punishment for a past rebellion, nine Greek gods are forced to walk the earth as mortals, hunted by the descendants of ancient bloodlines, all eager to kill a god and seize their divine power and immortality. Long ago, Lore Perseous fled that brutal world in the wake of her family’s sadistic murder by a rival line, turning her back on the hunt’s promises of eternal glory. For years she’s pushed away any thought of revenge against the man–now a god–responsible for their deaths.

Yet as the next hunt dawns over New York City, two participants seek out her help: Castor, a childhood friend of Lore believed long dead, and a gravely wounded Athena, among the last of the original gods.

The goddess offers an alliance against their mutual enemy and, at last, a way for Lore to leave the Agon behind forever. But Lore’s decision to bind her fate to Athena’s and rejoin the hunt will come at a deadly cost–and still may not be enough to stop the rise of a new god with the power to bring humanity to its knees.

5. Les sagas familiales

Je lis pas mal de sagas familiales, surtout par des auteurs russes. J’aime suivre le destin d’une famille sur une ou plusieurs générations. J’ai tellement d’exemples qui me viennent à l’esprit comme La saga moscovite de Vassily Axionov, Guerre & Paix de Léon Tolstoï (terminé en début d’année).

Cependant, si je dois prendre un exemple dans mes lectures très récentes, ce sont les Rougon-Macquart de Zola qui arrivent en premier. C’est aussi un des grands exemples de sagas familiales et celle-ci compte près de vingt tomes. Au début du mois, j’ai terminé le septième tome, L’Assommoir qui est un coup de coeur.

Qu’est-ce qui nous fascine dans la vie « simple et tranquille » de Gervaise Macquart ? Pourquoi le destin de cette petite blanchisseuse montée de Provence à Paris nous touche-t-il tant aujourd’hui encore ? Que nous disent les exclus du quartier de la Goutte-d’Or version Second Empire ? L’existence douloureuse de Gervaise est avant tout une passion où s’expriment une intense volonté de vivre, une générosité sans faille, un sens aigu de l’intimité comme de la fête. Et tant pis si, la fatalité aidant, divers «assommoirs» – un accident de travail, l’alcool, les «autres», la faim – ont finalement raison d’elle et des siens. Gervaise aura parcouru une glorieuse trajectoire dans sa déchéance même. Relisons L’Assommoir, cette «passion de Gervaise», cet étonnant chef-d’oeuvre, avec des yeux neufs.

Quels sont vos « lieux communs » préférés en littérature ? Quels en sont les meilleurs exemples ?