Sorties VO • Septembre 2021

Seven visitations of Sydney Burgess • Andy Marino • RedHook • 28 septembre • 304 pages

Sydney’s spent years burying her past and building a better life for herself and her eleven-year old son. A respectable marketing job, a house with reclaimed and sustainable furniture, and a boyfriend who loves her son and accepts her, flaws and all. But when she opens her front door, and a masked intruder knocks her briefly unconscious, everything begins to unravel. 

She wakes in the hospital and tells a harrowing story of escape. Of dashing out a broken window. Of running into her neighbors’ yard and calling the police. What the cops tell her is that she can no longer trust her memories. Because they say that not only is the intruder lying dead in her guest room, but he’s been murdered in a way that seems intimately personal. 

When she returns home, Sydney can’t shake the deep darkness that hides in every corner. There’s an unnatural whisper in her ear, urging her back to old addictions. And as her memories slowly return, she begins to fear that her new life was never built on solid ground-and that the secrets buried beneath will change everything. 

These toxic things • Rachel Howzell Hall • Thomas & Mercer • 1 septembre • 415 pages

Mickie Lambert creates “digital scrapbooks” for clients, ensuring that precious souvenirs aren’t forgotten or lost. When her latest client, Nadia Denham, a curio shop owner, dies from an apparent suicide, Mickie honors the old woman’s last wish and begins curating her peculiar objets d’art. A music box, a hair clip, a key chain―twelve mementos in all that must have meant so much to Nadia, who collected them on her flea market scavenges across the country.

But these tokens mean a lot to someone else, too. Mickie has been receiving threatening messages to leave Nadia’s past alone.

It’s becoming a mystery Mickie is driven to solve. Who once owned these odd treasures? How did Nadia really come to possess them? Discovering the truth means crossing paths with a long-dormant serial killer and navigating the secrets of a sinister past. One that might, Mickie fears, be inescapably entwined with her own.

The slow march of light • Heather B. Moore • Shadow Mountain • 7 septembre • 368 pages

In the summer of 1961, a wall of barbed wire goes up quickly in the dead of night, officially dividing Berlin. Aware of the many whose families have been divided, Luisa joins a secret spy network, risking her life to help East Germans escape across the Berlin Wall and into the West.

Bob Inama, a soldier in the US Army, is stationed in West Germany. He’s glad to be fluent in German, especially after meeting Luisa Voigt at a church social. As they spend time together, they form a close connection. But when Bob receives classified orders to leave for undercover work immediately, he doesn’t get the chance to say goodbye.

With a fake identity, Bob’s special assignment is to be a spy embedded in East Germany, identifying possible targets for the US military. But Soviet and East German spies, the secret police, and Stasi informants are everywhere, and the danger of being caught and sent to a brutal East German prison lurks on every corner.

The Collector’s Daughter • Gill Paul • William Morrow • 7 septembre • 384 pages

Lady Evelyn Herbert was the daughter of the Earl of Carnarvon, brought up in stunning Highclere Castle. Popular and pretty, she seemed destined for a prestigious marriage, but she had other ideas. Instead, she left behind the world of society balls and chaperones to travel to the Egyptian desert, where she hoped to become a lady archaeologist, working alongside her father and Howard Carter in the hunt for an undisturbed tomb.

In November 1922, their dreams came true when they discovered the burial place of Tutankhamun, packed full of gold and unimaginable riches, and she was the first person to crawl inside for three thousand years. She called it the “greatest moment” of her life—but soon afterwards everything changed, with a string of tragedies that left her world a darker, sadder place.

Newspapers claimed it was “the curse of Tutankhamun,” but Howard Carter said no rational person would entertain such nonsense. Yet fifty years later, when an Egyptian academic came asking questions about what really happened in the tomb, it unleashed a new chain of events that seemed to threaten the happiness Eve had finally found.

The Matzah Ball • Jean Meltzer • MIRA • 28 septembre • 416 pages

Rachel Rubenstein-Goldblatt is a nice Jewish girl with a shameful secret: she loves Christmas. For a decade she’s hidden her career as a Christmas romance novelist from her family. Her talent has made her a bestseller even as her chronic illness has always kept the kind of love she writes about out of reach.

But when her diversity-conscious publisher insists she write a Hanukkah romance, her well of inspiration suddenly runs dry. Hanukkah’s not magical. It’s not merry. It’s not Christmas. Desperate not to lose her contract, Rachel’s determined to find her muse at the Matzah Ball, a Jewish music celebration on the last night of Hanukkah, even if it means working with her summer camp archenemy—Jacob Greenberg.

Though Rachel and Jacob haven’t seen each other since they were kids, their grudge still glows brighter than a menorah. But as they spend more time together, Rachel finds herself drawn to Hanukkah—and Jacob—in a way she never expected. Maybe this holiday of lights will be the spark she needed to set her heart ablaze.

The Corpse Queen • Heather Herrman • GP Putnam • 14 septembre • 320 pages

Soon after her best friend Kitty mysteriously dies, orphaned seventeen-year-old Molly Green is sent away to live with her « aunt. » With no relations that she knows of, Molly assumes she has been sold as free domestic labor for the price of an extra donation in the church orphanage’s coffers. Such a thing is not unheard of. There are only so many options for an unmarried girl in 1850s Philadelphia. Only, when Molly arrives, she discovers her aunt is very much real, exceedingly wealthy, and with secrets of her own. Secrets and wealth she intends to share–for a price.

Molly’s estranged aunt Ava, has built her empire by robbing graves and selling the corpses to medical students who need bodies to practice surgical procedures. And she wants Molly to help her procure the corpses. As Molly learns her aunt’s trade in the dead of night and explores the mansion by day, she is both horrified and deeply intrigued by the anatomy lessons held at the old church on her aunt’s property. Enigmatic Doctor LaSalle’s lessons are a heady mixture of knowledge and power and Molly has never wanted anything more than to join his male-only group of students. But the cost of inclusion is steep and with a murderer loose in the city, the pursuit of power and opportunity becomes a deadly dance. 

The Magicians • Colm Toibin • Scribner • 7 septembre • 512 pages

Colm Tóibín’s new novel opens in a provincial German city at the turn of the twentieth century, where the boy, Thomas Mann, grows up with a conservative father, bound by propriety, and a Brazilian mother, alluring and unpredictable. Young Mann hides his artistic aspirations from his father and his homosexual desires from everyone. He is infatuated with one of the richest, most cultured Jewish families in Munich, and marries the daughter Katia. They have six children. On a holiday in Italy, he longs for a boy he sees on a beach and writes the story Death in Venice. He is the most successful novelist of his time, winner of the Nobel Prize in literature, a public man whose private life remains secret. He is expected to lead the condemnation of Hitler, whom he underestimates. His oldest daughter and son, leaders of Bohemianism and of the anti-Nazi movement, share lovers. He flees Germany for Switzerland, France and, ultimately, America, living first in Princeton and then in Los Angeles.

The Girl behind the wall • Mandy Robotham • Avon • 7 septembre • 416 pages

A city divided. When the Berlin Wall goes up, Karin is on the wrong side of the city. Overnight, she’s trapped under Soviet rule in unforgiving East Berlin and separated from her twin sister, Jutta.

Two sisters torn apart. Karin and Jutta lead parallel lives for years, cut off by the Wall. But Karin finds one reason to keep going: Otto, the man who gives her hope, even amidst the brutal East German regime.

One impossible choice… When Jutta finds a hidden way through the wall, the twins are reunited. But the Stasi have eyes everywhere, and soon Karin is faced with a terrible decision: to flee to the West and be with her sister, or sacrifice it all to follow her heart?

The last legacy • Adrienne Young • Wednesday Books • 7 septembre • 336 pages

When a letter from her uncle Henrik arrives on Bryn Roth’s eighteenth birthday, summoning her back to Bastian, Bryn is eager to prove herself and finally take her place in her long-lost family.

Henrik has plans for Bryn, but she must win everyone’s trust if she wants to hold any power in the delicate architecture of the family. It doesn’t take long for her to see that the Roths are entangled in shadows. Despite their growing influence in upscale Bastian, their hands are still in the kind of dirty business that got Bryn’s parents killed years ago. With a forbidden romance to contend with and dangerous work ahead, the cost of being accepted into the Roths may be more than Bryn can pay. 

All these bodies • Kendare Blake • Quill Tree Books • 16 septembre • 304 pages

Summer 1958—a string of murders plagues the Midwest. The victims are found in their cars and in their homes—even in their beds—their bodies drained, but with no blood anywhere. 

September 19- the Carlson family is slaughtered in their Minnesota farmhouse, and the case gets its first lead: 15-year-old Marie Catherine Hale is found at the scene. She is covered in blood from head to toe, and at first she’s mistaken for a survivor. But not a drop of the blood is hers.

Michael Jensen, son of the local sheriff, yearns to become a journalist and escape his small-town. He never imagined that the biggest story in the country would fall into his lap, or that he would be pulled into the investigation, when Marie decides that he is the only one she will confess to. 

As Marie recounts her version of the story, it falls to Michael to find the truth: What really happened the night that the Carlsons were killed? And how did one girl wind up in the middle of all these bodies? 

Summers Sons • Lee Mandelo • Tordotcom • 28 septembre • 384 pages

Andrew and Eddie did everything together, best friends bonded more deeply than brothers, until Eddie left Andrew behind to start his graduate program at Vanderbilt. Six months later, only days before Andrew was to join him in Nashville, Eddie dies of an apparent suicide. He leaves Andrew a horrible inheritance: a roommate he doesn’t know, friends he never asked for, and a gruesome phantom with bleeding wrists that mutters of revenge.

As Andrew searches for the truth of Eddie’s death, he uncovers the lies and secrets left behind by the person he trusted most, discovering a family history soaked in blood and death. Whirling between the backstabbing academic world where Eddie spent his days and the circle of hot boys, fast cars, and hard drugs that ruled Eddie’s nights, the walls Andrew has built against the world begin to crumble, letting in the phantom that hungers for him. 

Cloud Cuckoo Land • Anthony Doerr • Scribner • 28 septembre • 640 pages

Thirteen-year-old Anna, an orphan, lives inside the formidable walls of Constantinople in a house of women who make their living embroidering the robes of priests. Restless, insatiably curious, Anna learns to read, and in this ancient city, famous for its libraries, she finds a book, the story of Aethon, who longs to be turned into a bird so that he can fly to a utopian paradise in the sky. This she reads to her ailing sister as the walls of the only place she has known are bombarded in the great siege of Constantinople. Outside the walls is Omeir, a village boy, miles from home, conscripted with his beloved oxen into the invading army. His path and Anna’s will cross.

Five hundred years later, in a library in Idaho, octogenarian Zeno, who learned Greek as a prisoner of war, rehearses five children in a play adaptation of Aethon’s story, preserved against all odds through centuries. Tucked among the library shelves is a bomb, planted by a troubled, idealistic teenager, Seymour. This is another siege. And in a not-so-distant future, on the interstellar ship Argos, Konstance is alone in a vault, copying on scraps of sacking the story of Aethon, told to her by her father. She has never set foot on our planet.

Bilan des sorties VO lues • Janvier à Juin 2021

Depuis un peu plus d’un an, je propose un tour d’horizon des sorties VO (en anglais) qui me tentent énormément. J’en lis un certain nombre, mais sans toujours les chroniquer sur le blog. Le mois de Juin vient de toucher à sa fin et, avec lui, la moitié de l’année. L’occasion parfaite pour un petit bilan mi-parcours des parutions déjà lues et celles que j’aimerai encore découvrir.

En cliquant sur les mois, vous accédez à l’article sur les sorties VO correspondant.

Janvier

Livres lus

The House on Vesper Sands – Padraic O’Donnell

On the case is Inspector Cutter, a detective as sharp and committed to his work as he is wryly hilarious. Gideon Bliss, a Cambridge dropout in love with one of the missing girls, stumbles into a role as Cutter’s sidekick. And clever young journalist Octavia Hillingdon sees the case as a chance to tell a story that matters—despite her employer’s preference that she stick to a women’s society column. As Inspector Cutter peels back the mystery layer by layer, he leads them all, at last, to the secrets that lie hidden at the house on Vesper Sands.

J’avais hâte de pouvoir le lire, car il avait de bons arguments : un policier historique, la période victorienne, un meurtre qui semble mettre en oeuvre des forces occultes… Mais au bout d’un gros tiers, l’intrigue n’a toujours pas démarré et le livre commence à devenir trop lent et mon attention descendait en flèche. Même en dépassant la centaine de pages, je n’avais pas le sentiment que l’intrigue avait réellement commencé alors que quasiment un tiers était lu.

The Heiress, The Revelations of Anne de Bourgh – Molly Greeley

As a fussy baby, Anne de Bourgh’s doctor prescribed laudanum to quiet her, and now the young woman must take the opium-heavy tincture every day. Growing up sheltered and confined, removed from sunshine and fresh air, the pale and overly slender Anne grew up with few companions except her cousins, including Fitzwilliam Darcy. Throughout their childhoods, it was understood that Darcy and Anne would marry and combine their vast estates of Pemberley and Rosings. But Darcy does not love Anne or want her.

After her father dies unexpectedly, leaving her his vast fortune, Anne has a moment of clarity: what if her life of fragility and illness isn’t truly real? What if she could free herself from the medicine that clouds her sharp mind and leaves her body weak and lethargic? Might there be a better life without the medicine she has been told she cannot live without?

In a frenzy of desperation, Anne discards her laudanum and flees to the London home of her cousin, Colonel John Fitzwilliam, who helps her through her painful recovery. Yet once she returns to health, new challenges await. Shy and utterly inexperienced, the wealthy heiress must forge a new identity for herself, learning to navigate a “season” in society and the complexities of love and passion. The once wan, passive Anne gives way to a braver woman with a keen edge—leading to a powerful reckoning with the domineering mother determined to control Anne’s fortune . . . and her life.

Le livre prend place dans l’univers de Jane Austen et notamment Pride & Prejudice, en s’intéressant à la cousine de Fitzwilliam Darcy, Anne de Bourgh. Pas un coup de coeur car, malheureusement, le roman souffre de trop nombreuses longueurs. Cependant, Anne est un personnage attachant à suivre, surtout quand elle sort de son cocon. L’aspect historique est également bien développé.

Lore – Alexandra Bracken

Every seven years, the Agon begins. As punishment for a past rebellion, nine Greek gods are forced to walk the earth as mortals, hunted by the descendants of ancient bloodlines, all eager to kill a god and seize their divine power and immortality.

Long ago, Lore Perseous fled that brutal world in the wake of her family’s sadistic murder by a rival line, turning her back on the hunt’s promises of eternal glory. For years she’s pushed away any thought of revenge against the man–now a god–responsible for their deaths.

Yet as the next hunt dawns over New York City, two participants seek out her help: Castor, a childhood friend of Lore believed long dead, and a gravely wounded Athena, among the last of the original gods.

The goddess offers an alliance against their mutual enemy and, at last, a way for Lore to leave the Agon behind forever. But Lore’s decision to bind her fate to Athena’s and rejoin the hunt will come at a deadly cost–and still may not be enough to stop the rise of a new god with the power to bring humanity to its knees.

Lore est un roman d’action qui s’inspire de la mythologie grecque. Ce n’est pas totalement un coup de coeur, mais j’ai vraiment passé un bon moment. Il y a une bonne dose d’actions, de rebondissements… L’idée de départ est originale et bien développée.

Don’t tell a soul – Kirsten Miller

All Bram wanted was to disappear—from her old life, her family’s past, and from the scandal that continues to haunt her. The only place left to go is Louth, the tiny town on the Hudson River where her uncle, James, has been renovating an old mansion. But James is haunted by his own ghosts. Months earlier, his beloved wife died in a fire that people say was set by her daughter. The tragedy left James a shell of the man Bram knew—and destroyed half the house he’d so lovingly restored.

The manor is creepy, and so are the locals. The people of Louth don’t want outsiders like Bram in their town, and with each passing day she’s discovering that the rumors they spread are just as disturbing as the secrets they hide. Most frightening of all are the legends they tell about the Dead Girls. Girls whose lives were cut short in the very house Bram now calls home. The terrifying reality is that the Dead Girls may have never left the manor. And if Bram looks too hard into the town’s haunted past, she might not either.

En un seul mot… Creepy. L’histoire est dérangeante à souhaite et il y a quelques moments qui font bien frissonner. Il m’est arrivé à plusieurs reprises de devoir le mettre de côté, quand j’étais toute seule en soirée. L’auteur maîtrise parfaitement le suspens et à chaque page tournée, je voulais connaître la vérité, car il y avait quelques bizarreries qui interviennent durant la lecture… J’ai adoré l’évolution de l’intrigue et le livre est un coup de coeur.

Ceux que j’aimerais lire

Our darkest night de Jennifer Robson ; The Divines d’Ellie Eaton ; The last garden in England de Julia Kelly ; Faye, faraway d’Helen Fisher ; The Historians de Cecilia Eckbäck ; In the garden of spite de Camilla Bruce ; The Children’s train de Viola Ardone.

Février

Livres lus

The Paris Dressmaker – Kristy Cambron

Paris, 1939. Maison Chanel has closed, thrusting haute couture dressmaker Lila de Laurent out of the world of high fashion as Nazi soldiers invade the streets and the City of Lights slips into darkness. Lila’s life is now a series of rations, brutal restrictions, and carefully controlled propaganda while Paris is cut off from the rest of the world. Yet in hidden corners of the city, the faithful pledge to resist. Lila is drawn to La Resistance and is soon using her skills as a dressmaker to infiltrate the Nazi elite. She takes their measurements and designs masterpieces, all while collecting secrets in the glamorous Hôtel Ritz—the heart of the Nazis’ Parisian headquarters. But when dashing René Touliard suddenly reenters her world, Lila finds her heart tangled between determination to help save his Jewish family and bolstering the fight for liberation.

Paris, 1943. Sandrine Paquet’s job is to catalog the priceless works of art bound for the Führer’s Berlin, masterpieces stolen from prominent Jewish families. But behind closed doors, she secretly forages for information from the underground resistance. Beneath her compliant façade lies a woman bent on uncovering the fate of her missing husband . . . but at what cost? As Hitler’s regime crumbles, Sandrine is drawn in deeper when she uncrates an exquisite blush Chanel gown concealing a cryptic message that may reveal the fate of a dressmaker who vanished from within the fashion elite.

Je ressors extrêmement déçue par ce roman. En soi, il avait de quoi me plaire : la mode et plus particulièrement la Maison Chanel, Paris sous l’Occupation, la Résistance et le destin de deux femmes… Malheureusement, l’auteur alterne non seulement les deux points de vue, et deux époques différentes : le début de la guerre et 1944. Cela fait quatre trames différentes, et elles ne sont pas d’égal intérêt. J’ai eu du mal à m’attacher à Simone et Lila.

The Shadow War – Lindsay Smith

World War II is raging, and five teens are looking to make a mark. Daniel and Rebeka seek revenge against the Nazis who slaughtered their family; Simone is determined to fight back against the oppressors who ruined her life and corrupted her girlfriend; Phillip aims to prove that he’s better than his worst mistakes; and Liam is searching for a way to control the portal to the shadow world he’s uncovered, and the monsters that live within it–before the Nazi regime can do the same. When the five meet, and begrudgingly team up, in the forests of Germany, none of them knows what their future might hold.

As they race against time, war, and enemies from both this world and another, Liam, Daniel, Rebeka, Phillip, and Simone know that all they can count on is their own determination and will to survive. With their world turned upside down, and the shadow realm looming ominously large–and threateningly close–the course of history and the very fate of humanity rest in their hands. Still, the most important question remains: Will they be able to save it?

Il y a de bonnes idées : la Seconde Guerre mondiale, des forces occultes et un monde parallèle, une mission impossible… L’intrigue possède beaucoup trop de personnages et de points de vues différents pour que la lecture soit agréable. Je m’y perdais. Par ailleurs, les personnages sont plus des archétypes que réellement travaillés et nuancés. L’histoire traine en longueur alors que je m’attendais à plus d’action.

The Witch’s Heart – Genevieve Gornichec

Angrboda’s story begins where most witches’ tales end: with a burning. A punishment from Odin for refusing to provide him with knowledge of the future, the fire leaves Angrboda injured and powerless, and she flees into the farthest reaches of a remote forest. There she is found by a man who reveals himself to be Loki, and her initial distrust of him transforms into a deep and abiding love.

Their union produces three unusual children, each with a secret destiny, who Angrboda is keen to raise at the edge of the world, safely hidden from Odin’s all-seeing eye. But as Angrboda slowly recovers her prophetic powers, she learns that her blissful life—and possibly all of existence—is in danger.

With help from the fierce huntress Skadi, with whom she shares a growing bond, Angrboda must choose whether she’ll accept the fate that she’s foreseen for her beloved family…or rise to remake their future. From the most ancient of tales this novel forges a story of love, loss, and hope for the modern age.

J’adore les réécritures, que ce soit de contes ou de la mythologique. Genevieve Gornichec s’inspire d’une des épouses de Loki, Angrboda la sorcière. Ce type d’ouvrages se veut dans une lignée féministe, mais il rate quelque peu son effet. J’en ai lu la moitié avant d’abandonner. Le livre a été d’un tel ennui que je suis même étonnée d’avoir eu la patience de tenir jusque là.

Ceux que j’aimerais lire

While Paris slept de Ruth Druart ; The house upstairs de Julia Fine ; The invisible woman d’Erika Robuck ; A history of what come next de Sylvain Neuvel ; All Girls d’Emily Layden ; The kitchen front de Jennifer Ryan.

Mars

Livres lus

After Alice felll – Kim Taylor Blakemore

New Hampshire, 1865. Marion Abbott is summoned to Brawders House asylum to collect the body of her sister, Alice. She’d been found dead after falling four stories from a steep-pitched roof. Officially: an accident. Confidentially: suicide. But Marion believes a third option: murder.

Returning to her family home to stay with her brother and his second wife, the recently widowed Marion is expected to quiet her feelings of guilt and grief—to let go of the dead and embrace the living. But that’s not easy in this house full of haunting memories. Just when the search for the truth seems hopeless, a stranger approaches Marion with chilling words: I saw her fall.

Now Marion is more determined than ever to find out what happened that night at Brawders, and why. With no one she can trust, Marion may risk her own life to uncover the secrets buried with Alice in the family plot. 

Un roman rempli de secrets de famille avec une atmosphère loure. Malgré quelques lenteurs qui peuvent parfois ponctuer le livre, les pages se tournent facilement, car l’envie de savoir ce qui est arrivé à Alice est plus forte, tout comme celle de découvrir le ou les secrets du frère de Marion et de son épouse. Pas un coup de coeur, mais une bonne lecture.

The Women of Château Lafayette – Stephanie Dray

A founding mother…
1774. Gently-bred noblewoman Adrienne Lafayette becomes her husband’s political partner in the fight for American independence. But when their idealism sparks revolution in France and the guillotine threatens everything she holds dear, Adrienne must choose to renounce the complicated man she loves, or risk her life for a legacy that will inspire generations to come.

A daring visionary…
1914. Glittering New York socialite Beatrice Astor Chanler is a force of nature, daunted by nothing–not her humble beginnings, her crumbling marriage, or the outbreak of war. But after witnessing the devastation in France and delivering war-relief over dangerous seas, Beatrice takes on the challenge of a lifetime: convincing America to fight for what’s right.

A reluctant resistor…
1940. French school-teacher and aspiring artist Marthe Simone has an orphan’s self-reliance and wants nothing to do with war. But as the realities of Nazi occupation transform her life in the isolated castle where she came of age, she makes a discovery that calls into question who she is, and more importantly, who she is willing to become. 

Lafayette revient à la mode après la sortie de la comédie musicale Hamilton. Stephanie Dray en fait l’élément central de son nouveau roman en explorant le destin de trois femmes durant la Révolution française, la Première et la Deuxième Guerre mondiale. Même si les époques sont totalement différentes pour ne pas être confondues, certaines sont plus intéressantes que d’autres. Néanmoins, cela reste un livre que j’ai abandonné.

Ceux que j’aimerais lire

Under the light of the Italian moon de Jennifer Anton ; Vera de Carol Edgarian ; The lost village de Camilla Sten ; The Rose Code de Kate Quinn ; The lost apothecary de Sarah Penner.

Avril

Livres lus

Sistersong – Lucy Holland

535 AD. In the ancient kingdom of Dumnonia, King Cador’s children inherit a fragmented land abandoned by the Romans.

Riva, scarred in a terrible fire, fears she will never heal.
Keyne battles to be seen as the king’s son, when born a daughter.
And Sinne, the spoiled youngest girl, yearns for romance.

All three fear a life of confinement within the walls of the hold – a last bastion of strength against the invading Saxons. But change comes on the day ash falls from the sky, bringing Myrddhin, meddler and magician, and Tristan, a warrior whose secrets will tear the siblings apart. Riva, Keyne and Sinne must take fate into their own hands, or risk being tangled in a story they could never have imagined; one of treachery, love and ultimately, murder. It’s a story that will shape the destiny of Britain.

Le résumé me faisait penser à une pièce de Shakespeare : trois soeurs aux destins différentes et dramatiques. J’ai adoré suivre l’histoire de ces soeurs, d’apprendre à les connaître, leurs secrets, leurs rêves et leurs espoirs. Elles sont différentes et je ne saurai dire laquelle a été ma préférée. Elles m’ont plu pour des raisons diverses. J’ai adoré à la fois le contexte historique (la Grande-Bretagne après la chute de l’Empire romain) et fantastique (la présence de magie et de Merlin). Le coup de coeur n’était pas loin, mais c’est un très bon roman que je ne regrette pas d’avoir découvert.

Ceux que j’aimerais lire

Ariadne de Jennifer Saint ; Near the bone de Christina Henry ; Ophelia de Norman Bacal ; The Mary Shelley Club de Goldy Moldavsky ; The last bookshop of London de Madeline Martin ; The Dictionnary of lost words de Pip Williams.

Mai

Ceux que j’aimerais lire

The Radio Operator d’Ulla Lenze ; Madam de Phoebe Wynne ; The lights of Prague de Nicole Jarvis.

Juin

Ceux que j’aimerais lire

The Wolf and the Woodsman d’Ava Reid ; Daughter of Sparta de Claire M. Andrews ; The nature of the witches de Rachel Griffin ; The Maidens d’Alex Michaelides ; For the Wolf d’Hannah F. Whitten.

Top 5 Wednesday #2 • Backlist Book

Thème : Backlist Book

Le premier thème du mois de juin concerne les livres qui ont été publiés il y a un ou plus, mais qui n’ont pas encore été lu et/ou achetés. Voici mes cinq livres prioritaires en ce moment.

Les thèmes du mois peuvent être trouvés ici.


1. The Poppy & the Rose – Ashlee Cowles

1912: Ava Knight, a teen heiress, boards the Titanic to escape the shadow of her unstable mother and to fulfill her dream of becoming a photographer in New York. During the journey she meets three people who will change her life: a handsome sailor, a soldier in the secret Black Hand society that will trigger World War I, and a woman with clairvoyant abilities. When disaster strikes the ship, family betrayals come to light.

2010: When Taylor Romano arrives in Oxford for a summer journalism program, something feels off. Not only is she greeted by a young, Rolls Royce-driving chauffeur, but he invites her to tea with Lady Mae Knight of Meadowbrook Manor, an old house with a cursed history going back to the days of Henry VIII. Lady Knight seems to know a strange amount about Taylor and her family problems, but before Taylor can learn more, the elderly woman dies, leaving as the only clue an old diary. With the help of the diary, a brooding chauffeur, and some historical sleuthing, Taylor must uncover the link between Ava’s past and her own….

Je suis une grande lectrice de romans historiques. Celui-ci me tente énormément, car il est plutôt rare que je lise autour du Titanic, pourtant un événement qui m’intéresse.

2. Mercy House – Alena Dillon

In the Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood of Brooklyn stands a century-old row house presided over by renegade, silver-haired Sister Evelyn. Gruff and indomitable on the surface, warm and wry underneath, Evelyn and her fellow sisters makes Mercy House a safe haven for the abused and abandoned.

Women like Lucia, who arrives in the dead of night; Mei-Li, the Chinese and Russian house veteran; Desiree, a loud and proud prostitute; Esther, a Haitian immigrant and aspiring collegiate; and Katrina, knitter of lumpy scarves… all of them know what it’s like to be broken by men.

Little daunts Evelyn, until she receives word that Bishop Robert Hawkins is coming to investigate Mercy House and the nuns, whose secret efforts to help the women in ways forbidden by the Church may be uncovered. But Evelyn has secrets too, dark enough to threaten everything she has built.

Evelyn will do anything to protect Mercy House and the vibrant, diverse women it serves—confront gang members, challenge her beliefs, even face her past. As she fights to defend all that she loves, she discovers the extraordinary power of mercy and the grace it grants, not just to those who receive it, but to those strong enough to bestow it.

J’aime les histoires où la maison, demeure… prend une place importante. À cela s’ajoute le destin de femmes hors du commun et que tout semble opposé pour sauver leur refuge. Je suis impatiente de pouvoir le découvrir.

3. Daughter of the Reich – Louise Fein

As the dutiful daughter of a high-ranking Nazi officer, Hetty Heinrich is keen to play her part in the glorious new Thousand Year Reich. But she never imagines that all she believes and knows about her world will come into stark conflict when she encounters Walter, a Jewish friend from the past, who stirs dangerous feelings in her. Confused and conflicted, Hetty doesn’t know whom she can trust and where she can turn to, especially when she discovers that someone has been watching her.

Realizing she is taking a huge risk—but unable to resist the intense attraction she has for Walter—she embarks on a secret love affair with him. Together, they dream about when the war will be over and plan for their future. But as the rising tide of anti-Semitism threatens to engulf them, Hetty and Walter will be forced to take extreme measures.

Il doit sortir prochainement en français. Le résumé m’a tout de suite plu, car il me rappelle les Mandy Robotham que j’aime beaucoup. Je l’avais déjà mis en avant dans un article sur les sorties en anglais qui me tentent énormément, il y a un an. Depuis, il traîne dans ma wish-list et il n’a toujours pas été acheté et lu. Sûrement un de mes prochains achats avec le prochain.

4. The Ratline – Philippe Sands

As Governor of Galicia, SS Brigadeführer Otto Freiherr von Wächter presided over an authority on whose territory hundreds of thousands of Jews and Poles were killed, including the family of the author’s grandfather. By the time the war ended in May 1945, he was indicted for ‘mass murder’. Hunted by the Soviets, the Americans, the Poles and the British, as well as groups of Jews, Wächter went on the run. He spent three years hiding in the Austrian Alps, assisted by his wife Charlotte, before making his way to Rome where he was helped by a Vatican bishop. He remained there for three months. While preparing to travel to Argentina on the ‘ratline’ he died unexpectedly, in July 1949, a few days after spending a weekend with an ‘old comrade’.

In The Ratline Philippe Sands offers a unique account of the daily life of a senior Nazi and fugitive, and of his wife. Drawing on a remarkable archive of family letters and diaries, he unveils a fascinating insight into life before and during the war, on the run, in Rome, and into the Cold War. Eventually the door is unlocked to a mystery that haunts Wächter’s youngest son, who continues to believe his father was a good man – what happened to Otto Wächter, and how did he die?

J’ai beaucoup aimé son premier essai, East West Street, sur le dévéloppement des notions de génocide, crimes contre l’humanité. Il retourne sur ce terrain fertile de la Seconde Guerre mondiale en parlant du réseau de fuite nazi. Je connais cet aspect du conflit, mais sans être réellement rentrée dans les détails. Cela fait un an qu’il est sorti et je ne l’ai toujours pas acheté, mais prochainement.

5. Hamnet – Maggie O’Farrell

Warwickshire in the 1580s. Agnes is a woman as feared as she is sought after for her unusual gifts. She settles with her husband in Henley street, Stratford, and has three children: a daughter, Susanna, and then twins, Hamnet and Judith. The boy, Hamnet, dies in 1596, aged eleven. Four years or so later, the husband writes a play called Hamlet.

Ce livre a beaucoup fait parler de lui et il m’intéresse énormément, car il parle de Shakespeare. Ce dernier a toujours été un de mes auteurs préférés. Il est sorti l’année dernière et il a été traduit récemment en français, aux éditions Belfond.

Top 5 Wednesday #1 • Favorite Tropes

J’inaugure un nouveau rendez-vous sur le blog avec le Top 5 Wednesday. Je ne pense pas forcément participer toutes les semaines, mais si le thème me plait et me parle, c’est avec plaisir que j’y réagirai. Les sujets sont annoncés chaque mois sur le groupe Goodreads.

Thème : Favorite Tropes

Avant de me lancer dans cet article, j’ai fait quelques recherches sur ce terme de tropes et sur ce qu’il pouvait signifiait en français. Le meilleur terme que j’ai trouvé est celui de lieux communs. À titre d’exemples, dans les romances, ce seraient les fausses relations amoureuses ou tout ce qui touche à la royauté, les mariages de convenance… Pour le fantastique, ce sont les thématiques d’un•e Élu•e, sauver le monde… Pour mes cinq « lieux communs » préférés, j’ai essayé de tirer un exemple parmi mes plus récentes lectures, ou, du moins, depuis le début d’année.

1. La quête

L’exemple le plus parlant est sans conteste la quête du Graal. Je pense aussi au Seigneur des Anneaux de J.R.R. Tolkien. C’est un lieu commun que j’apprécie beaucoup. Dans mon esprit, il y a toujours le côté partir à l’aventure, aller vers l’inconnu, sortir de sa zone de confort… Le personnage principal va tirer des connaissances, des expériences de son voyage.

Un des derniers livres que j’ai pu lire et qui représente parfaitement cette idée de quête est le troisième tome de la série La Passe-Miroir, La mémoire de Babel. De manière général, la série raconte la quête d’Ophélie et Thorn pour découvrir l’identité de Dieu et l’arrêter.

Thorn a disparu depuis deux ans et demi et Ophélie désespère. Les indices trouvés dans le livre de Farouk et les informations livrées par Dieu mènent toutes à l’arche de Babel, dépositaire des archives mémorielles du monde. Ophélie décide de s’y rendre sous une fausse identité.

2. Une relique ou un artefact puissant•e

S’il est doublé d’une quête, c’est encore mieux ! Je pense que mon amour pour ce genre de lieux communs vient d’Indiana Jones, qui est présenté comme un chasseur de reliques et de trésor (même si, en réalité, il est plus un pilleur de tombes). Certaines d’entre elles ont des propriétés magiques. En littérature, il y a, à nouveau, la quête du Graal, ou les thrillers ésotériques, genres dont je raffole.

Et c’est justement un thriller ésotérique que je vais prendre en exemple avec une des mes toutes dernières lectures. Elle date du début du mois. Il s’agit du troisième tome de la dernière série d’Éric Giacometti et Jacques Ravenne, Soleil noir, La relique du chaos. Les reliques (très particulières pour le coup) ont un caractère mystique et magique.

Juillet 1942. Jamais l’issue du conflit n’a semblé aussi incertaine. Si l’Angleterre a écarté tout risque d’invasion, la Russie de Staline plie sous les coups de boutoir des armées d’Hitler. L’Europe est sur le point de basculer. À travers la quête des Swastikas, la guerre occulte se déchaîne pour tenter de faire pencher la balance. Celui qui s’emparera de l’objet sacré remportera la victoire. Tristan Marcas, agent double au passé obscur, part à la recherche du trésor des Romanov, qui cache, selon le dernier des tsars, l’ultime relique. À Berlin, Moscou et Londres, la course contre la montre est lancée, entraînant dans une spirale vertigineuse Erika, l’archéologue allemande et Laure, la jeune résistante française…

3. Un amour impossible

La faute à Roméo et Juliette de Shakespeare, qui est une de mes pièces préférées au monde. Je prend ce thème ou lieux commun dans un sens très large, car des raisons pour lesquelles un amour peut être impossible sont variées.

Un des derniers livres que j’ai lu et qui peut illustrer ce sujet est Follow me to ground de Sue Rainsford. Il s’agit d’une histoire d’amour entre une sorcière et un mortel qui est vu d’un mauvais oeil par les familles des deux protagonistes.

LIEN VERS L’ARTICLE

Ada and her father, touched by the power to heal illness, live on the edge of a village where they help sick locals—or “Cures”—by cracking open their damaged bodies or temporarily burying them in the reviving, dangerous Ground nearby. Ada, a being both more and less than human, is mostly uninterested in the Cures, until she meets a man named Samson. When they strike up an affair, to the displeasure of her father and Samson’s widowed, pregnant sister, Ada is torn between her old way of life and new possibilities with her lover—and eventually comes to a decision that will forever change Samson, the town, and the Ground itself.

4. Un conflit avec un dieu

C’est un lieu commun qui, pour le coup, brasse très large. Il me rappelle à la fois les récits bibliques, la mythologie grecque… Je pense aussi à des livres fantastiques ou de science-fiction, les réécritures autour des mythes et légendes.

Un livre que j’ai très récemment lu (et apprécié) et dans lequel l’intrigue a pour origine un conflit avec un dieu est Lore d’Alexandra Bracken. Le conflit est entre Zeus et les dieux, les anciens et les nouveaux dieux, les dieux avec les chasseurs… L’auteur s’inspire de la mythologie grecque.

Every seven years, the Agon begins. As punishment for a past rebellion, nine Greek gods are forced to walk the earth as mortals, hunted by the descendants of ancient bloodlines, all eager to kill a god and seize their divine power and immortality. Long ago, Lore Perseous fled that brutal world in the wake of her family’s sadistic murder by a rival line, turning her back on the hunt’s promises of eternal glory. For years she’s pushed away any thought of revenge against the man–now a god–responsible for their deaths.

Yet as the next hunt dawns over New York City, two participants seek out her help: Castor, a childhood friend of Lore believed long dead, and a gravely wounded Athena, among the last of the original gods.

The goddess offers an alliance against their mutual enemy and, at last, a way for Lore to leave the Agon behind forever. But Lore’s decision to bind her fate to Athena’s and rejoin the hunt will come at a deadly cost–and still may not be enough to stop the rise of a new god with the power to bring humanity to its knees.

5. Les sagas familiales

Je lis pas mal de sagas familiales, surtout par des auteurs russes. J’aime suivre le destin d’une famille sur une ou plusieurs générations. J’ai tellement d’exemples qui me viennent à l’esprit comme La saga moscovite de Vassily Axionov, Guerre & Paix de Léon Tolstoï (terminé en début d’année).

Cependant, si je dois prendre un exemple dans mes lectures très récentes, ce sont les Rougon-Macquart de Zola qui arrivent en premier. C’est aussi un des grands exemples de sagas familiales et celle-ci compte près de vingt tomes. Au début du mois, j’ai terminé le septième tome, L’Assommoir qui est un coup de coeur.

Qu’est-ce qui nous fascine dans la vie « simple et tranquille » de Gervaise Macquart ? Pourquoi le destin de cette petite blanchisseuse montée de Provence à Paris nous touche-t-il tant aujourd’hui encore ? Que nous disent les exclus du quartier de la Goutte-d’Or version Second Empire ? L’existence douloureuse de Gervaise est avant tout une passion où s’expriment une intense volonté de vivre, une générosité sans faille, un sens aigu de l’intimité comme de la fête. Et tant pis si, la fatalité aidant, divers «assommoirs» – un accident de travail, l’alcool, les «autres», la faim – ont finalement raison d’elle et des siens. Gervaise aura parcouru une glorieuse trajectoire dans sa déchéance même. Relisons L’Assommoir, cette «passion de Gervaise», cet étonnant chef-d’oeuvre, avec des yeux neufs.

Quels sont vos « lieux communs » préférés en littérature ? Quels en sont les meilleurs exemples ?

Patricia Falvey • The Girls of Ennismore (2017)

The Girls of Ennismore • Patricia Falvey • 2017 • Editions Corvus • 480 pages

It’s the early years of the twentieth century, and Victoria Bell and Rosie Killeen are best friends. Growing up in rural Ireland’s County Mayo, their friendship is forged against the glorious backdrop of Ennismore House. However, Victoria, born of the aristocracy, and Rosie, daughter of a local farmer, both find that the disparity of their class and the simmering social tension in Ireland will push their friendship to the brink… 

J’ai découvert ce roman grâce à Céline, du blog Le monde de Sapotille. Nous l’avons lu ensemble dans le cadre de son challenge littéraire autour de l’Irlande. Roman historique se déroulant en Irlande, je suis déçue par cet ouvrage qui ne m’a pas du tout transporté.

J’ai eu beaucoup de mal à m’attacher aux deux personnages principaux, Victoria et Rosie. Dès les premières pages, alors qu’elles sont encore en enfance, je n’ai réussi à créer aucun lien avec elles. Même quand elles grandissent, je ne me suis pas investie dans leurs nouvelles vies et ambitions. Rosie est peut-être celle que j’ai le plus apprécié (tout en nuançant mon propos). Son destin est un peu plus intéressant, mais son orgueil m’a parfois découragé. Victoria, la jeune aristocrate, n’est pas un personnage qui m’a convaincu. Sa rébellion sonnait faux à mes yeux. Je ne sais pas si elle faisait pour dire de faire, d’ennuyer sa mère en étant en conflit constant avec elle ou parce qu’elle s’intéressait vraiment à l’indépendance irlandaise. Je pense que cela est notamment dû au manque de profondeur des personnages. En tant que lectrice, j’ai trouvé que l’accès à leurs pensées, motivations profondes ne transparaît qu’à travers les dialogues.

Le début du roman a également été difficile avec les trop nombreuses ellipses narratives. J’ai eu du mal à suivre ces bons dans le temps, mais, à la rigueur, j’en comprenais certaines : mettre rapidement des éléments en place pour arriver plus vite au coeur du sujet. Je pensais réellement qu’une fois l’intrigue bien mise en place, il n’y en aurait plus. Je me trompais. J’ai encore eu ce sentiment de sauter parfois du coq à l’âne ou d’avoir raté un épisode. Il y a des événements ou des annonces qui tombent comme un cheveu sur la soupe à cause de cette omniprésence d’ellipses. L’effet de surprise est quelque peu plat, à mon avis. À cela s’ajoutent un manque de suspens et des épisodes qui se voient venir… Non, merci.

De plus, du fait de ces ellipses narratives à répétition, le rythme et la qualité du roman sont très inégaux d’un chapitre à l’autre, ou même d’une sous-partie à l’autre. Il y a quelques aspects qui m’ont dérangé. En premier lieu, Patricia Falvey situe son roman durant une époque très intéressante. Le début du XIX siècle est mouvementé avec des bouleversements sociaux, le rejet de la société de classe avec le déclin progressif des aristocrates et des grands propriétaires terriens que le naufrage du Titanic, mais surtout la Première Guerre mondiale vont accélérer. Ces points sont évoqués dans le roman, mais ils manquent sérieusement de développement à mon goût. Tout comme pour les personnages, beaucoup de choses semblent simplement survoler.

Par exemple, l’héritier mâle d’Ennismore décède lors du naufrage du Titanic. Il s’agit aussi de l’exemple type d’annonce qui arrive sans réel suspens à partir du moment où l’auteur évoque un voyage en Amérique sur un nouveau paquebot prodigieux, mais aussi dont l’effet tombe un peu comme un cheveu sur la soupe. J’ai trouvé les conséquences de l’après traitées de manière très légère alors qu’il s’agit tout de même d’un grand chamboulement. En contrepartie, Patricia Falvey passe du temps sur d’autres aspects qui m’ont semblé bien moins intéressants. J’aurai apprécié ce livre, s’il y avait bien une centaine de pages en moins.

C’est une période historique également mouvementée pour l’Irlande, car en 1916, se déroule l’insurrection de Pâques. C’est un échec militaire du fait de l’absence de mobilisation populaire à Dublin (et Enniscorthy). La déclaration d’indépendance a lieu le 21 janvier 1919, et s’ensuit la guerre d’indépendance de janvier 1919 à juillet 1921. Elle aboutit à la création de la République d’Irlande. Arrivée à la moitié environ de cette fresque historique, avec de décider d’abandonner cette lecture, j’ai eu du mal à voir le frémissement d’une volonté de voir l’Irlande indépendante dans les deux personnages principaux. Les domestiques l’évoquent rapidement, mais plus contre les classes sociales, l’écrasement qui subissent de la part des aristocrates. J’y ai plus vu une lutte des classes que réellement une lutte indépendantiste.

The Girls of Ennismore est une fresque historique qui avait tout pour me plaire : le destin de deux femmes courageuses à une époque où elles sont cantonnées à trois rôles différents (mère et épouse, forces de travail ou prostituées) ; l’Irlande à l’aube de son indépendance avec également l’évocation du naufrage du Titanic et le premier conflit mondial. L’auteur évoque l’émancipation des femmes. Toutefois, de trop nombreux points m’ont déçue. Ce roman n’a pas su me charmer et m’impliquer dans les destins de Rosie et Victoria. Il sera bien vite oublié.

Emerald Island Challenge #3

La femme qui se cognait dans les portes • Roddy Doyle • 1996 • Pavillons Poche • 329 pages

Après le succès de sa trilogie de Barrytown et le triomphe de Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha, Roddy Doyle réussit un nouveau tour de force avec ce roman où il trouve – lui, un homme – le ton juste pour dire « Moi, Paula, trente-neuf ans, femme battue ». C’est avec un mélange d’humour – irlandais bien sûr – et de cruauté qu’il prend la voix de cette Paula Spencer, une Dublinoise dont la vie conjugale a été ponctuée de raclées, de dents et de côtes brisées, alcoolique au surplus et par voie de conséquence. Mais qui reste digne et garde la force de prétendre, à l’hôpital, après chaque dérouillée, qu’elle s’est « cognée dans la porte », un grand livre.

Roddy Doyle est un auteur irlandais que j’aime beaucoup et dont j’ai déjà lu quelques titres quand j’avais une vingtaine d’années, comme sa trilogie Barrytown ou Trois femmes et un fantôme. Je retourne vers lui avec La femme qui se cognait dans les portes, publié la première fois dans les années 1990. Le roman n’a pas pris une ride et il reste malheureusement d’actualité. Le sujet abordé est celui des violences domestiques et il est raconté du point de vue d’une femme qui a subi pendant de longues années les coups de son mari.

C’est un roman avec lequel j’ai eu énormément de mal, et je n’ai pas réussi à le terminer. Il est extrêmement rare que j’apprécie d’être autant mise mal à l’aise par une lecture. Cela a été le cas dès le début. Roddy Doyle ne cache rien des abus physiques et moraux que subit le personnage principal de la part de son mari, mais aussi durant son adolescence de la part de sa famille ou de ses camarades. L’auteur montre parfaitement que la violence est absolument partout. Il faut souvent avoir le coeur bien accroché, car il y a des passages difficiles. Même si c’est un livre essentiel, il n’est pas à mettre entre toutes les mains.

Certes, un abandon pour ma part. Je pense que je l’ai lu à un mauvais moment et je suis totalement passée à côté.

Follow me to ground • Sue Rainsford • 2020 • Scribner • 208 pages

Ada and her father, touched by the power to heal illness, live on the edge of a village where they help sick locals—or “Cures”—by cracking open their damaged bodies or temporarily burying them in the reviving, dangerous Ground nearby. Ada, a being both more and less than human, is mostly uninterested in the Cures, until she meets a man named Samson. When they strike up an affair, to the displeasure of her father and Samson’s widowed, pregnant sister, Ada is torn between her old way of life and new possibilities with her lover—and eventually comes to a decision that will forever change Samson, the town, and the Ground itself.

Je découvre la plume d’une nouvelle écrivaine irlandaise, Sue Rainsford. Follow me to ground est un roman particulier, mais qui m’a laissé sur le banc de touche.

Il y avait de bonnes idées avec les guérisons, une famille un peu magique. Depuis quelques temps, j’apprécie les ouvrages mettant en scène un certain réalisme magique. Celui-ci avait donc tout pour me plaire. Cependant, dès les premières pages, l’auteur m’a complètement perdu. Elle lâche son lecteur dans un monde sans réelles explications. Celles qui sont données sont bien trop vagues et n’aident pas à la compréhension globale de l’ouvrage. Je ne comprenais pas ce que je lisais. Ce n’était pas un problème de niveau de langue, mais des descriptions et des passages très bizarres, notamment les interventions chirurgicales.

Non seulement j’ai eu du mal avec les descriptions à imaginer l’histoire, les personnages, les lieux, je n’ai pas aimé le rythme saccadé de l’histoire, les va-et-vient dans le temps. Je me suis également attaché à aucun des différents personnages, aucun lien ne se crée avec eux. Il est ainsi d’autant plus difficile de s’investir dans l’intrigue ou leurs destins. En définitif, je suis restée très en extérieur de ce roman. Il est pourtant relativement court, mais je me suis vraiment ennuyée.

Adrian McKinty • Une terre si froide (2012)

Une terre si froide • Adrian McKinty • Le Livre de Poche • 2012 • 432 pages

Carrickfergus, Irlande du Nord. Le gréviste de la faim Bobby Sands vient de mourir et la région est sous haute tension. C’est dans ce contexte oppressant que le sergent Sean Duffy est appelé d’urgence pour résoudre une étrange enquête : un homme a été retrouvé dans un terrain vague, une main coupée. La victime est un homosexuel notoire. Un mobile suffisant ? Puis une deuxième victime est découverte, présentant les mêmes sévices. Aurait-on affaire au premier serial killer de l’histoire du pays ? Duffy sait toutefois que les apparences sont souvent trompeuses, lui qui incarne un paradoxe en Ulster : il est fl ic et catholique. Adrian McKinty réussit le pari de faire vivre la violence de la guerre civile en même temps qu’il nous entraîne au coeur d’une enquête palpitante, maniée avec un humour noir si cher aux Irlandais.

Lu dans le cadre de l’Emerald Island Challenge, Une terre si froide faisait partie de ma petite pile à lire. Il était celui qui me faisait le moins envie et, pourtant le coup de coeur n’était pas loin pour ce premier tome de la série Sean Duffy.

Le premier point que j’ai apprécié est le contexte historique. L’intrigue se déroule à Belfast, en Irlande du Nord, en pleine émeute, grèves de la faim des prisonniers de l’IRA. Bobby Sands est mort quelques jours avant que l’histoire ne démarre. Les tensions entre les Catholiques et les Protestants sont à leur summum. L’auteur nous présente un certain nombre de principaux mouvements indépendantistes et loyalistes. J’avais peur de m’y perdre, car même au sein d’entre eux, il y a des subtilités, des alliances, des histoires de territoires… Cependant, pas d’inquiétude ! Adrian McKinty livre des explications très claires. Je ne me suis pas embrouillée dans tous ces groupes ou pour savoir qui est protestant ou catholique. Ce contexte historique est très développé et l’auteur a réalisé un travail fantastique sur l’ambiance qui m’a fait vivre les tensions et les dangers à chaque fois que la police sort, quand le personnage principal, le sergent Sean Duffy, regarde sous sa voiture tous les matins à la recherche d’une bombe. Cela correspond parfaitement au temps gris et froid de l’Irlande du Nord, présent dans le livre.

Concernant l’intrigue, elle se déploie autour d’un possible tueur en série dans la région de Belfast, qui s’en prend aux homosexuels. À cette époque, l’homosexualité est encore considérée comme un délit, comme illégale en Irlande du Nord. Alors que ce n’était pas l’ouvrage qui me faisait le plus envie sur le moment, dès les premières pages, j’ai été totalement happée par l’histoire. L’ambiance y joue certes un rôle, mais la plume de l’auteur également. Cette enquête reste pourtant classique dans un certain sens avec deux groupes de meurtres qui ne sont pas en lien en apparence… Mais rien est gratuit dans ce genre de romans et le lecteur essaie de chercher le point commun entre eux. C’est plutôt prenant, car l’enquête avance pour mieux reculer. Sean Duffy tatillonne et le lecteur avec lui. Le fait de suivre ses pensées, questionnements permet de comprendre son raisonnement pour découvrir le coupable. Ainsi, je n’ai pas eu l’impression de rater un épisode dans le cheminement vers l’identité du meurtrier. J’ai commencé à avoir quelques doutes dans les derniers chapitres… Pour que ce dernier soit confirmé à la fin. Une enquête qui rappelle que les apparences sont parfois trompeuses.

J’ai aussi apprécié le personnage de Sean Duffy. Cynique, il apporte quelques touches d’humour en pointant parfois certaines situations ridicules, que les deux ennemis de toujours peuvent s’entendre quand ils ont des intérêts communs. Il a un côté attachant et profondément humain. L’auteur montre ses qualités, sans rien cacher non plus de ses défauts et/ou de ses doutes. Il ne manque pas de profondeur. La vulgarité qui est présente ne m’a pas gêné outre mesure, car cela correspondait bien à l’ambiance, le lieu et l’enquête.

Une terre si froide a été une bonne surprise où l’enquête sert surtout à évoquer l’histoire de l’Irlande du Nord. La fin est à la fois fermée – l’enquête étant bouclée – et ouverte. Il y a un second tome, qui s’intitule Dans la rue j’entends les sirènes. S’il croise un jour ma route, pourquoi pas.

Bilan 2020

C’est avec aucun regret que je laisse 2020 se terminer. Comme pour beaucoup, cette année a été éprouvante à tout point de vue avec son lot de mauvaises nouvelles et de coups durs professionnels (je travaille dans la culture). Durant cette année, je me suis énormément réfugiée dans la lecture, à la fois pour faire passer le temps et supporter ces confinements qui m’ont pesé, je l’avoue. J’ai aussi repris en main de blog, abandonné pendant une bonne partie de 2019.

En janvier 2020, j’avais émis le souhait totalement fou et irréaliste de lire au moins 200 livres, soit le double de ce que je lis habituellement. Le pari n’a pas été si fou puisque j’ai lu très exactement 223 livres durant l’année, soit 72.205 pages. Merci les confinements !

2020 a été une année placée sous le signe des essais en histoire et en histoire de l’art. Ils représentent 28% de mes lectures. J’ai aussi redécouvert les classiques de la littérature française des XVIIIe et XIXe siècles avec Émile Zola, Voltaire et Rousseau et tête. Les classiques représentent 13,6% de ce que j’ai lu, soit 34 livres, dont une dizaine de classiques russes, allemands (dont le premier tome Guerre & Paix). Découverte de la littérature classique allemande avec un coup de coeur pour Les souffrances du jeune Werther.

Mon trois meilleures lectures de 2020

The Hollow Places de T. Kingfisher est un des meilleurs romans d’horreur que j’ai pu lire depuis bien longtemps. Je suis un petit en retard dans la publication de mes avis littéraires et celui-ci devrait arriver très prochainement. Je n’en dis donc pas plus. Mais c’est un de mes gros coups de coeur de l’année.

All the bad apples de Moïra Rowley-Doyle est un des livres qui m’a le plus marqué cette année : l’Irlande, la place de la femme, le réalisme magique qui se dégage de ce roman, une histoire de famille… J’ai adoré et je le relirai avec plaisir. Pour lire mon avis sur ce dernier, c’est par ici. [lien]

Enfin, The Year of the Witching d’Alexis Henderson… Un autre livre d’horreur, mais totalement différent du Kingfisher avec une société puritaine, des sorcières, des bains de sang… Gros coup de coeur pour ce premier roman d’horreur par une auteur à suivre. J’avais publié une chronique. [lien]

Mes trois plus grosses déceptions de 2020

Eoin Colfer signait son grand retour avec un roman pour les jeunes adultes, Highfire. J’ai adoré plus jeune les Artemis Fowl qui est une série avec laquelle j’ai grandi. Je n’ai pas du tout aimé ce nouveau livre. Pour savoir pourquoi je n’ai pas aimé cet ouvrage, voici mon billet. [lien]

Alors que je préparais cet article, je savais que Three Hours in Paris de Cara Black finirait dans mes déceptions de l’année. Je l’avais pourtant mis dans les sorties VO qui me tentaient, mais encore aujourd’hui, je ne sais pas si je dois rire ou pleurer devant ce livre… En tout cas, j’y ai lu la phrase la plus improbable de l’année. Ma chronique est à lire sur le blog. [lien]

Dernier livre dans mes déceptions, Cursed de Frank Miller et Thomas Wheeler. La série m’avait quelque peu laissé sur ma faim. J’avais envie d’avoir plus de développements et je me suis tournée vers le livre qui reste fidèle à la série… Et je n’y ai donc pas trouvé ce que j’espérais. J’avais publié un article sur le sujet. [lien]

J’en ai fini de mes coups de coeur et déceptions de l’année et j’avais envie de faire un tour d’horizons de mes résolutions prises début 2020 et si elles ont été tenues.

En premier lieu, je souhaitais lire une dizaine de pièces de théâtre. Même si j’en ai lu quelques unes, elles se comptent sur les doigts d’une seule main… Et encore. J’ai redécouvert quelques classiques comme Le mariage de Figaro de Beaumarchais ou Cyrano de Bergerac d’Edmond de Rostand. En revanche, j’ai réussi à lire les dix recueils de poésie avec autant des classiques que de la poésie contemporaines. J’ai relu Les Contemplations de Victor Hugo, Les fleurs du mal de Charles Baudelaire. J’ai dévoré le dernier recueil de Rupi Kaur, Home Body.

Je voulais également terminer quatre séries en cours. J’en ai fini trois, donc je suis plutôt contente.

J’espérai avoir une pile à lire à zéro à la fin du mois de décembre. Je termine l’année avec 21 livres qui attendent d’être lus. J’ai pas mal craqué la dernière semaine et j’ai fait quelques achats.

Le plus gros objectif de lecture que je m’étais fixée pour 2020 était de commencer et finir les Rougon-Macquart d’Émile Zola. J’en ai lu que cinq cette année, de La fortune des Rougon à La faute de l’abbé Mouret. La suite sera pour 2021, ayant déjà commandé le prochain, Son Excellence Eugène Rougon.

Une autre résolution, la dernière, était de lire une cinquantaine de romans ou essais en anglais. Record battu ! J’ai lu 86 romans en anglais. Je ne suis pas encore à 50/50, mais c’est tout de même un beau score. Je ne m’y attendais pas.

2020 n’a pas été une année aussi riche culturellement que je l’espérais, mais j’ai pu commencer l’année en allant aux ballets russes voir Casse-Noisette, qui est un de mes préférés (je vénère Tchaikovsky). Un merveilleux moment partagé avec l’une de mes petites soeurs. J’ai aussi visité quelques coins de la France que je ne connaissais pas, et notamment la Haute-Savoie. J’ai pu visiter le château de Montrottier, les Jardins Secrets de Vaulx, un endroit totalement hors du temps, le musée de la Résistance haut-savoyarde à Morette ainsi que la ville d’Annecy. En août, j’ai pris la direction d’Albi pour découvrir cette magnifique cité médiéval ainsi que les petites villes d’Ambialet et de Cordes-sur-Ciel. [article sur ces quelques jours dans le Tarn]

J’ai pu visiter le musée Toulouse-Lautrec ainsi que la rétrospective Christo et Jeanne-Claude au musée Würth d’Erstein. [compte-rendu de l’exposition]

Sorties VO • Janvier 2021

Après un mois de Décembre un peu léger, Janvier semble être tout le contraire. De nombreuses publications alléchantes sont proposées. N’hésitez pas à me dire en commentaire lesquelles vous font le plus envie !

Don’t tell a soul • Kirsten Miller • Delacorte Press • 384 pages • 26 janvier

People say the house is cursed.
It preys on the weakest, and young women are its favorite victims.
In Louth, they’re called the Dead Girls.

All Bram wanted was to disappear—from her old life, her family’s past, and from the scandal that continues to haunt her. The only place left to go is Louth, the tiny town on the Hudson River where her uncle, James, has been renovating an old mansion.
But James is haunted by his own ghosts. Months earlier, his beloved wife died in a fire that people say was set by her daughter. The tragedy left James a shell of the man Bram knew—and destroyed half the house he’d so lovingly restored.
The manor is creepy, and so are the locals. The people of Louth don’t want outsiders like Bram in their town, and with each passing day she’s discovering that the rumors they spread are just as disturbing as the secrets they hide. Most frightening of all are the legends they tell about the Dead Girls. Girls whose lives were cut short in the very house Bram now calls home.
The terrifying reality is that the Dead Girls may have never left the manor. And if Bram looks too hard into the town’s haunted past, she might not either.

Esnared in the wolf lair : Inside the 1944 Plot to Kill Hitler and the Ghost Children of His Revenge • Ann Bausum • National Geographic Kids • 144 pages • 12 janvier

« I’ve come on orders from Berlin to fetch the three children. »–Gestapo agent, August 24, 1944
With those chilling words Christa von Hofacker and her younger siblings found themselves ensnared in a web of family punishment designed to please one man-Adolf Hitler. The furious dictator sought merciless revenge against not only Christa’s father and the other Germans who had just tried to overthrow his government. He wanted to torment their relatives, too, regardless of age or stature. All of them. Including every last child.

The Secret Life of Dorothy Soames • Justine Cowan • Harper • 320 pages • 12 janvier

Justine had always been told that her mother came from royal blood. The proof could be found in her mother’s elegance, her uppercrust London accent—and in a cryptic letter hinting at her claim to a country estate. But beneath the polished veneer lay a fearsome, unpredictable temper that drove Justine from home the moment she was old enough to escape. Years later, when her mother sent her an envelope filled with secrets from the past, Justine buried it in the back of an old filing cabinet.

Overcome with grief after her mother’s death, Justine found herself drawn back to that envelope. Its contents revealed a mystery that stretched back to the early years of World War II and beyond, into the dark corridors of the Hospital for the Maintenance and Education of Exposed and Deserted Young Children. Established in the eighteenth century to raise “bastard” children to clean chamber pots for England’s ruling class, the institution was tied to some of history’s most influential figures and events. From its role in the development of solitary confinement and human medical experimentation to the creation of the British Museum and the Royal Academy of Arts, its impact on Western culture continues to reverberate. It was also the environment that shaped a young girl known as Dorothy Soames, who bravely withstood years of physical and emotional abuse at the hands of a sadistic headmistress—a resilient child who dreamed of escape as German bombers rained death from the skies.

The Children’s Train • Viola Ardone • HarperVia • 320 pages • 12 janvier

Though Mussolini and the fascists have been defeated, the war has devastated Italy, especially the south. Seven-year-old Amerigo lives with his mother Antonietta in Naples, surviving on odd jobs and his wits like the rest of the poor in his neighborhood. But one day, Amerigo learns that a train will take him away from the rubble-strewn streets of the city to spend the winter with a family in the north, where he will be safe and have warm clothes and food to eat. 

Together with thousands of other southern children, Amerigo will cross the entire peninsula to a new life. Through his curious, innocent eyes, we see a nation rising from the ashes of war, reborn. As he comes to enjoy his new surroundings and the possibilities for a better future, Amerigo will make the heartbreaking choice to leave his mother and become a member of his adoptive family.

In the Garden of Spite • Camilla Bruce • Berkley • 480 pages • 19 janvier

They whisper about her in Chicago. Men come to her with their hopes, their dreams–their fortunes. But no one sees them leave. No one sees them at all after they come to call on the Widow of La Porte. The good people of Indiana may have their suspicions, but if those fools knew what she’d given up, what was taken from her, how she’d suffered, surely they’d understand. Belle Gunness learned a long time ago that a woman has to make her own way in this world. That’s all it is. A bloody means to an end. A glorious enterprise meant to raise her from the bleak, colorless drudgery of her childhood to the life she deserves. After all, vermin always survive.

The House on Vesper Sands • Paraic O’Donnell • Tin House Books • 408 pages • 12 janvier

On the case is Inspector Cutter, a detective as sharp and committed to his work as he is wryly hilarious. Gideon Bliss, a Cambridge dropout in love with one of the missing girls, stumbles into a role as Cutter’s sidekick. And clever young journalist Octavia Hillingdon sees the case as a chance to tell a story that matters—despite her employer’s preference that she stick to a women’s society column. As Inspector Cutter peels back the mystery layer by layer, he leads them all, at last, to the secrets that lie hidden at the house on Vesper Sands.

The Historians • Cecilia Eckbäck • Harper Perennial • 464 pages • 12 janvier

It is 1943 and Sweden’s neutrality in the war is under pressure. Laura Dahlgren, the bright, young right-hand of the chief negotiator to Germany, is privy to these tensions, even as she tries to keep her head down in the mounting fray. However, when Laura’s best friend from university, Britta, is discovered murdered in cold blood, Laura is determined to find the killer.

Prior to her death, Britta sent a report on the racial profiling in Scandinavia to the secretary to the Minister of Foreign Affairs, Jens Regnell. In the middle of negotiating a delicate alliance with Hitler and the Nazis, Jens doesn’t understand why he’s received the report. When the pursuit of Britta’s murderer leads Laura to his door, the two join forces to get at the truth.

But as Jens and Laura attempt to untangle the mysterious circumstance surrounding Britta’s death, they only become more mired in a web of lies and deceit. This trail will lead to a conspiracy that could topple their nation’s identity—a conspiracy some in Sweden will try to keep hidden at any cost.

Faye, Faraway • Helen Fischer • Gallery Books • 304 pages • 26 janvier

Faye is a thirty-seven-year-old happily married mother of two young daughters. Every night, before she puts them to bed, she whispers to them: “You are good, you are kind, you are clever, you are funny.” She’s determined that they never doubt for a minute that their mother loves them unconditionally. After all, her own mother Jeanie had died when she was only seven years old and Faye has never gotten over that intense pain of losing her.

But one day, her life is turned upside down when she finds herself in 1977, the year before her mother died. Suddenly, she has the chance to reconnect with her long-lost mother, and even meets her own younger self, a little girl she can barely remember. Jeanie doesn’t recognize Faye as her daughter, of course, even though there is something eerily familiar about her…

As the two women become close friends, they share many secrets—but Faye is terrified of revealing the truth about her identity. Will it prevent her from returning to her own time and her beloved husband and daughters? What if she’s doomed to remain in the past forever? Faye knows that eventually she will have to choose between those she loves in the past and those she loves in the here and now, and that knowledge presents her with an impossible choice.

The Heiress: The Revelations of Anne de Bourgh • Molly Greeley • William Morrow • 368 pages • 5 janvier

As a fussy baby, Anne de Bourgh’s doctor prescribed laudanum to quiet her, and now the young woman must take the opium-heavy tincture every day. Growing up sheltered and confined, removed from sunshine and fresh air, the pale and overly slender Anne grew up with few companions except her cousins, including Fitzwilliam Darcy. Throughout their childhoods, it was understood that Darcy and Anne would marry and combine their vast estates of Pemberley and Rosings. But Darcy does not love Anne or want her.

After her father dies unexpectedly, leaving her his vast fortune, Anne has a moment of clarity: what if her life of fragility and illness isn’t truly real? What if she could free herself from the medicine that clouds her sharp mind and leaves her body weak and lethargic? Might there be a better life without the medicine she has been told she cannot live without?

In a frenzy of desperation, Anne discards her laudanum and flees to the London home of her cousin, Colonel John Fitzwilliam, who helps her through her painful recovery. Yet once she returns to health, new challenges await. Shy and utterly inexperienced, the wealthy heiress must forge a new identity for herself, learning to navigate a “season” in society and the complexities of love and passion. The once wan, passive Anne gives way to a braver woman with a keen edge—leading to a powerful reckoning with the domineering mother determined to control Anne’s fortune . . . and her life.

Last Garden in England • Julia Kelly • Gallery Books • 368 pages • 12 janvier

Present day: Emma Lovett, who has dedicated her career to breathing new life into long-neglected gardens, has just been given the opportunity of a lifetime: to restore the gardens of the famed Highbury House estate, designed in 1907 by her hero Venetia Smith. But as Emma dives deeper into the gardens’ past, she begins to uncover secrets that have long lain hidden.

1907: A talented artist with a growing reputation for her ambitious work, Venetia Smith has carved out a niche for herself as a garden designer to industrialists, solicitors, and bankers looking to show off their wealth with sumptuous country houses. When she is hired to design the gardens of Highbury House, she is determined to make them a triumph, but the gardens—and the people she meets—promise to change her life forever.

1944: When land girl Beth Pedley arrives at a farm on the outskirts of the village of Highbury, all she wants is to find a place she can call home. Cook Stella Adderton, on the other hand, is desperate to leave Highbury House to pursue her own dreams. And widow Diana Symonds, the mistress of the grand house, is anxiously trying to cling to her pre-war life now that her home has been requisitioned and transformed into a convalescent hospital for wounded soldiers. But when war threatens Highbury House’s treasured gardens, these three very different women are drawn together by a secret that will last for decades. 

The Divines • Ellie Eaton • William Morrow • 320 pages • 19 janvier

The girls of St John the Divine, an elite English boarding school, were notorious for flipping their hair, harassing teachers, chasing boys, and chain-smoking cigarettes. They were fiercely loyal, sharp-tongued, and cuttingly humorous in the way that only teenage girls can be. For Josephine, now in her thirties, the years at St John were a lifetime ago. She hasn’t spoken to another Divine in fifteen years, not since the day the school shuttered its doors in disgrace.

Yet now Josephine inexplicably finds herself returning to her old stomping grounds. The visit provokes blurry recollections of those doomed final weeks that rocked the community. Ruminating on the past, Josephine becomes obsessed with her teenage identity and the forgotten girls of her one-time orbit. With each memory that resurfaces, she circles closer to the violent secret at the heart of the school’s scandal. But the more Josephine recalls, the further her life unravels, derailing not just her marriage and career, but her entire sense of self. 

Our darkest night • Jennifer Robson • William Morrow • 384 pages • 5 janvier

It is the autumn of 1943, and life is becoming increasingly perilous for Italian Jews like the Mazin family. With Nazi Germany now occupying most of her beloved homeland, and the threat of imprisonment and deportation growing ever more certain, Antonina Mazin has but one hope to survive—to leave Venice and her beloved parents and hide in the countryside with a man she has only just met.

Nico Gerardi was studying for the priesthood until circumstances forced him to leave the seminary to run his family’s farm. A moral and just man, he could not stand by when the fascists and Nazis began taking innocent lives. Rather than risk a perilous escape across the mountains, Nina will pose as his new bride. And to keep her safe and protect secrets of his own, Nico and Nina must convince prying eyes they are happily married and in love.

But farm life is not easy for a cultured city girl who dreams of becoming a doctor like her father, and Nico’s provincial neighbors are wary of this soft and educated woman they do not know. Even worse, their distrust is shared by a local Nazi official with a vendetta against Nico. The more he learns of Nina, the more his suspicions grow—and with them his determination to exact revenge.

As Nina and Nico come to know each other, their feelings deepen, transforming their relationship into much more than a charade. Yet both fear that every passing day brings them closer to being torn apart . . .

Lore • Alexandra Bracken • Disney Hyperion • 480 pages • 5 janvier

Every seven years, the Agon begins. As punishment for a past rebellion, nine Greek gods are forced to walk the earth as mortals, hunted by the descendants of ancient bloodlines, all eager to kill a god and seize their divine power and immortality.
Long ago, Lore Perseous fled that brutal world in the wake of her family’s sadistic murder by a rival line, turning her back on the hunt’s promises of eternal glory. For years she’s pushed away any thought of revenge against the man–now a god–responsible for their deaths.

Yet as the next hunt dawns over New York City, two participants seek out her help: Castor, a childhood friend of Lore believed long dead, and a gravely wounded Athena, among the last of the original gods.

The goddess offers an alliance against their mutual enemy and, at last, a way for Lore to leave the Agon behind forever. But Lore’s decision to bind her fate to Athena’s and rejoin the hunt will come at a deadly cost–and still may not be enough to stop the rise of a new god with the power to bring humanity to its knees.