Top 5 Wednesday • Debut Novels

Le thème de cette semaine met en avant le premier roman publié d’un auteur. Quels sont mes cinq préférés ? J’ai essayé de me le limiter à ceux lus depuis le début d’année.

The Lost Apothecary • Sarah Penner

Rule #1: The poison must never be used to harm another woman.

Rule #2: The names of the murderer and her victim must be recorded in the apothecary’s register.

One cold February evening in 1791, at the back of a dark London alley in a hidden apothecary shop, Nella awaits her newest customer. Once a respected healer, Nella now uses her knowledge for a darker purpose—selling well-disguised poisons to desperate women who would kill to be free of the men in their lives. But when her new patron turns out to be a precocious twelve-year-old named Eliza Fanning, an unexpected friendship sets in motion a string of events that jeopardizes Nella’s world and threatens to expose the many women whose names are written in her register.

In present-day London, aspiring historian Caroline Parcewell spends her tenth wedding anniversary alone, reeling from the discovery of her husband’s infidelity. When she finds an old apothecary vial near the river Thames, she can’t resist investigating, only to realize she’s found a link to the unsolved “apothecary murders” that haunted London over two centuries ago. As she deepens her search, Caroline’s life collides with Nella’s and Eliza’s in a stunning twist of fate—and not everyone will survive.

The lights of Prague • Nicole Jarvis

In the quiet streets of Prague all manner of otherworldly creatures lurk in the shadows. Unbeknownst to its citizens, their only hope against the tide of predators are the dauntless lamplighters – a secret elite of monster hunters whose light staves off the darkness each night. Domek Myska leads a life teeming with fraught encounters with the worst kind of evil: pijavice, bloodthirsty and soulless vampiric creatures. Despite this, Domek find solace in his moments spent in the company of his friend, the clever and beautiful Lady Ora Fischerová– a widow with secrets of her own.

When Domek finds himself stalked by the spirit of the White Lady – a ghost who haunts the baroque halls of Prague castle – he stumbles across the sentient essence of a will-o’-the-wisp, a mischievous spirit known to lead lost travellers to their death, but who, once captured, are bound to serve the desires of their owners.

After discovering a conspiracy amongst the pijavice that could see them unleash terror on the daylight world, Domek finds himself in a race against those who aim to twist alchemical science for their own dangerous gain.

The lost village • Camilla Sten

Documentary filmmaker Alice Lindstedt has been obsessed with the vanishing residents of the old mining town, dubbed “The Lost Village,” since she was a little girl. In 1959, her grandmother’s entire family disappeared in this mysterious tragedy, and ever since, the unanswered questions surrounding the only two people who were left—a woman stoned to death in the town center and an abandoned newborn—have plagued her. She’s gathered a small crew of friends in the remote village to make a film about what really happened.

But there will be no turning back.

Not long after they’ve set up camp, mysterious things begin to happen. Equipment is destroyed. People go missing. As doubt breeds fear and their very minds begin to crack, one thing becomes startlingly clear to Alice:

They are not alone. They’re looking for the truth… But what if it finds them first?

The Miniaturist • Jesse Burton

On a brisk autumn day in 1686, eighteen-year-old Nella Oortman arrives in Amsterdam to begin a new life as the wife of illustrious merchant trader Johannes Brandt. But her new home, while splendorous, is not welcoming. Johannes is kind yet distant, always locked in his study or at his warehouse office—leaving Nella alone with his sister, the sharp-tongued and forbidding Marin.

Lien vers l’article

The Year of the Witching • Alexis Henderson

A young woman living in a rigid, puritanical society discovers dark powers within herself in this stunning, feminist fantasy debut.

In the lands of Bethel, where the Prophet’s word is law, Immanuelle Moore’s very existence is blasphemy. Her mother’s union with an outsider of a different race cast her once-proud family into disgrace, so Immanuelle does her best to worship the Father, follow Holy Protocol, and lead a life of submission, devotion, and absolute conformity, like all the other women in the settlement.

But a mishap lures her into the forbidden Darkwood surrounding Bethel, where the first prophet once chased and killed four powerful witches. Their spirits are still lurking there, and they bestow a gift on Immanuelle: the journal of her dead mother, who Immanuelle is shocked to learn once sought sanctuary in the wood.

Fascinated by the secrets in the diary, Immanuelle finds herself struggling to understand how her mother could have consorted with the witches. But when she begins to learn grim truths about the Church and its history, she realizes the true threat to Bethel is its own darkness. And she starts to understand that if Bethel is to change, it must begin with her. 

Molly Greeley • The Heiress, The Revelations of Anne de Bourgh

The Heiress, The Revelations of Anne de Bourgh • Molly Greeley • Janvier 2020 • William Morrow • 357 pages

As a fussy baby, Anne de Bourgh’s doctor prescribed laudanum to quiet her, and now the young woman must take the opium-heavy tincture every day. Growing up sheltered and confined, removed from sunshine and fresh air, the pale and overly slender Anne grew up with few companions except her cousins, including Fitzwilliam Darcy. Throughout their childhoods, it was understood that Darcy and Anne would marry and combine their vast estates of Pemberley and Rosings. But Darcy does not love Anne or want her.

After her father dies unexpectedly, leaving her his vast fortune, Anne has a moment of clarity: what if her life of fragility and illness isn’t truly real? What if she could free herself from the medicine that clouds her sharp mind and leaves her body weak and lethargic? Might there be a better life without the medicine she has been told she cannot live without?

In a frenzy of desperation, Anne discards her laudanum and flees to the London home of her cousin, Colonel John Fitzwilliam, who helps her through her painful recovery. Yet once she returns to health, new challenges await. Shy and utterly inexperienced, the wealthy heiress must forge a new identity for herself, learning to navigate a “season” in society and the complexities of love and passion. The once wan, passive Anne gives way to a braver woman with a keen edge—leading to a powerful reckoning with the domineering mother determined to control Anne’s fortune . . . and her life.


Je continue ma découverte de livres s’inspirant de l’univers de Jane Austen. En décembre, je lisais The Jane Austen Society, en me promettant de lire les romans de cette auteur. La moitié de l’année est bien passée et je n’ai toujours pas ouvert l’un d’entre eux. Je reviens avec la chronique d’un livre qui se déroule dans l’univers de Pride & Prejudice, puisque Molly Greeley s’intéresse à un personnage tertiaire, Anne de Bourgh, la cousine de Fitzwilliam Darcy, qu’il aurait dû épouser.

Ne pas avoir lu le roman de Jane Austen n’est pas un problème. Il y a juste quelques éléments principaux de l’intrigue qui sont dévoilés. Cependant, c’est une histoire assez connue, donc pas de réels spoilers. La lecture a été plutôt en demi-teinte. En effet, le roman présente beaucoup de longueurs dès le début. À la rigueur, cela me paraissait être un choix parfait pour la première partie. L’histoire est racontée à la première personne et les premières pages sont racontées alors qu’Anne de Bourgh est sous l’emprise du laudanum, une drogue largement utilisée durant l’époque victorienne. Pour Anne, elle est traitée avec ce « médicament » depuis qu’elle est bébé. Toutefois, quand elle parvient enfin à s’en passer, je m’attendais à ce que le livre devienne un peu plus rythmée, dynamique, mais, malheureusement, le tout reste très lent. En tant que lectrice, j’ai bien eu souvent l’envie de secouer Anne.

C’est un aspect intéressant du livre que l’écriture suive l’état de santé du personnage principal. Cela permet de voir à quel point le laudanum avait une emprise sur Anne, à quel point il changeait sa personnalité. Il y a une véritable évolution de cette dernière. Elle sort de sa chrysalide après son sevrage, même si parfois trop doucement à mon goût. Le roman a un côté initiatique, aspect renforcé par le contexte historique de la saison londonienne où toutes les filles de bonne famille se retrouvaient pour trouver un mari. C’est souvent un rite de passage obligé à cette époque. L’aspect historique est bien développé.

Le fait que l’intrigue est issue de l’univers de Jane Austen devient presque anecdotique. Pendant de longs passages, j’oubliais presque que la base de l’oeuvre est Pride & Prejudice. C’est quand on croise Darcy et Elizabeth que je me rappelais qu’Anne de Bourgh est un personnage tertiaire de ce roman. Tout comme dans le roman de Jane Austen, les relations sociales et amoureuses, la pression faite aux jeunes femmes de trouver le meilleur parti est au coeur de l’intrigue. Molly Greeley évoque également les relations homosexuelles au sein de cette société conservatrice et c’est un point assez intéressant du roman. Par ailleurs, j’ai aussi beaucoup aimé les passages où la mère d’Anne évoque la maladie de sa famille. Ce sont des passages qui m’ont profondément révolté, mais c’est ce qui se faisait à l’époque.

The Heiress, The Revelations of Anne de Bourgh est un roman historique intéressant, mais qui souffre de nombreuses longueurs. Cependant, il m’a plu par d’autres aspects : le personnage principal attachant, la description du contexte historique. Le fait fait que l’auteur trouve son inspiration dans l’oeuvre de Jane Austen ne change pas grand chose à cette intrigue. Personnellement, je l’ai plus vu comme un détail anecdotique.

Top 5 Wednesday • Underrated authors

Le thème de cette semaine met en avant les auteurs que l’on pense « sous-côté » ou qui méritent plus d’attention. Pour créer ce top 5, qui ne comprend en réalité que quatre auteurs, je me base surtout sur les blogs que j’ai l’habitude de lire.

Christina Henry

Elle revient systématiquement sur mon blog, car je lis toujours ses nouvelles publications dès leurs sorties. Ce sont souvent des réécritures de contes ou autour d’un mythe comme Alice au Pays des Merveilles, le Yéti ou Peter Pan. Ses univers sont malsains, sombres et torturés. Ils peuvent mettre mal à l’aise, mais j’adore ça. Je n’ai pour l’instant jamais été déçue par ses romans et je les recommande chaudement. J’avais d’ailleurs écrit un article à son sujet. [lien]

Philip Kerr

Il est peut-être un peu plus connu que Christina Henry. C’est aussi un des auteurs les plus représentés dans mes bibliothèques. Sa série Bernie Gunther m’a tenu en haleine pendant de longues années. Je me suis énormément attachée à ce personnage et son humour noir, cynique. Le contexte historique est parfaitement documenté. J’en avais aussi parlé sur le blog il y a quelques années. [lien]

Émile Zola

Je redécouvre cet auteur depuis quelques mois. Alors qu’il était ma bête noire de mes années lycée, je l’apprécie de plus en plus. J’avance doucement mais sûrement dans les Rougon-Macquart, mais, pour le moment, rares sont les tomes que je n’ai pas apprécié.

Ben Aaronovitch

Il signe aussi une des séries que j’adore, les Peter Grant. Elle mêle magie, humour anglais et références à la pop culture britannique à coup de Sherlock Holmes, Doctor Who ou Harry Potter. Je me régale à chaque tome, et il m’en reste que quelques uns avant de l’avoir définitivement terminée… Pour mon plus grand regret, car c’est le type de livres que j’adore lire un cas de coup de mou.

Sherlock, Saison 4

Les aventures de Sherlock Holmes et de son acolyte de toujours, le docteur John Watson, sont transposées au XXIème siècle… 

Avec : Benedict Cumberbatch ; Martin Freeman ; Mark Gatiss ; Amanda Abbington ; Andrew Scott…


J’ai pris mon temps pour regarder cette ultime saison de Sherlock. Sortie en 2017, je ne la découvre que bien des années après. C’est avec plaisir que je retrouve des personnages que j’adore. Ils sont toujours aussi attachants et il est difficile de le dire au revoir. L’épisode de Noël est un régal à regarder, en reprenant les costumes d’époque. J’ai beaucoup aimé la manière dont il lie cet épisode avec la troisième et la quatrième saison.

Les trois épisodes sont intéressants, avec des moments plus épiques les uns que les autres. Une mention toute particulière pour le personnage de Mrs Hudson, qui amène tout autant un potentiel pour les émotions et le comique. Il y a encore quelques touches d’humour présentes et qui font aussi fait le succès de la série. Cependant, c’est une quatrième saison qui est encore plus sombre que les précédentes.

Cette saison voit l’apparition d’un nouveau personnage. Je ne me souviens pas qu’elle soit dans le canon holmésien, mais j’ai adoré cette soeur encore plus intelligente que les frères et beaucoup plus dangereuse également. Elle est l’égale de Moriarty au niveau de la malveillance. Elle apporte beaucoup de tension au fil de la saison avec l’apothéose du dernier épisode.

Ce dernier m’a laissé un sentiment un peu mitigé. Il y a du positif et du négatif. Globalement, c’est quand même plus positif. C’est tout de même un très bon épisode, digne de la série. Je vais commencer par le positif. Le premier aspect que j’ai apprécié est le huis clos qui prend place pendant une bonne partie de l’épisode, renforçant le drame et le suspens. Ces derniers n’ont eu de cesse de monter en pression depuis le début de la saison, notamment avec les « Miss me » disséminés. Par ailleurs, le spectateur, durant cet épisode, ne s’est jamais quel sera le prochain coup d’Eurus, rajoutant un effet d’anticipation, car tout peut bousculer d’un moment à l’autre dans le chaos.

Deuxièmement, mais quel plaisir de revoir Jim Moriarty. C’est un personnage que j’avais adoré dès sa première apparition et Andrew Scott en a fait une interprétation légendaire. Il a un charisme fou. Il nous avait habitué à des entrées fracassantes, et je suis loin d’être déçue. Les scénaristes m’ont régalé d’une nouvelle entrée épique, avec un choix de musique absolument parfait. Après Staying alive des Beegees, c’est au tour de Queen. Gros coup de coeur.

C’est un épisode prenant, plein de rythme qui rappelles des épisodes du canon qui n’ont pas fait l’objet d’un épisode spécifique, comme Les trois Garrideb, par exemple. Cependant, ce que je retiens du Dernier problème, ce sont les émotions présentes à cause des épreuves exigées par Eurus. Il y a eu des moments où j’ai eu la gorge serrée devant les choix que s’offrent à Sherlock, Mycroft et John. Les frères Holmes vont être bien malmenés par leur soeur et, pour une fois, ils vont montrer des faiblesses, surtout Mycroft, qui a toujours semblé sous contrôle et en parfaite maîtrise de lui-même. Sa façade vole en éclat dans cet épisode. J’ai apprécié d’en savoir plus sur les deux frères eux-mêmes, leur enfance… Gros point positif pour clore cette série et ce dernier épisode avait tous les ingrédients pour être une tragédie. En tout cas, je ne pouvais pas détourner les yeux de mon écran.

Le seul point négatif que je retiens est que quelques passages m’ont semblé tirer par les cheveux ou incohérents. Eurus apparaît toujours maître d’elle-même, calme, froide et calculatrice. Pourtant, dans les dernières scènes, elle devient une enfant effrayée et perdue… Pour que quelques scènes après, elle redevienne elle-même. J’ai trouvé ça un peu bizarre, je dois dire. À moins que, vu sous le prisme de la manipulation, ça peut constituer un début d’explications.

Sherlock aura été une série qui m’aura marqué par bien des aspects : la qualité du scénario et de la manière de filmer, les performances différents acteurs qui ont fait beaucoup de chemin depuis…

Sorties VO • Août 2021

A lesson in vengeance • Victoria Lee • Delacorte Press • 3 août • 384 pages

Felicity Morrow is back at Dalloway School.

Perched in the Catskill mountains, the centuries-old, ivy-covered campus was home until the tragic death of her girlfriend. Now, after a year away, she’s returned to graduate. She even has her old room in Godwin House, the exclusive dormitory rumored to be haunted by the spirits of five Dalloway students—girls some say were witches. The Dalloway Five all died mysteriously, one after another, right on Godwin grounds.

Witchcraft is woven into Dalloway’s history. The school doesn’t talk about it, but the students do. In secret rooms and shadowy corners, girls convene. And before her girlfriend died, Felicity was drawn to the dark. She’s determined to leave that behind her now; all Felicity wants is to focus on her senior thesis and graduate. But it’s hard when Dalloway’s occult history is everywhere. And when the new girl won’t let her forget.

It’s Ellis Haley’s first year at Dalloway, and she’s already amassed a loyal following. A prodigy novelist at seventeen, Ellis is a so-called “method writer.” She’s eccentric and brilliant, and Felicity can’t shake the pull she feels to her. So when Ellis asks Felicity for help researching the Dalloway Five for her second book, Felicity can’t say no. Given her history with the arcane, Felicity is the perfect resource.

The Dead & the Dark • Courtney Gould • Wednesday Books • 3 août • 352 pages

Something is wrong in Snakebite, Oregon. Teenagers are disappearing, some turning up dead, the weather isn’t normal, and all fingers seem to point to TV’s most popular ghost hunters who have just returned to town. Logan Ortiz-Woodley, daughter of TV’s ParaSpectors, has never been to Snakebite before, but the moment she and her dads arrive, she starts to get the feeling that there’s more secrets buried here than they originally let on.

Ashley Barton’s boyfriend was the first teen to go missing, and she’s felt his presence ever since. But now that the Ortiz-Woodleys are in town, his ghost is following her and the only person Ashley can trust is the mysterious Logan. When Ashley and Logan team up to figure out who—or what—is haunting Snakebite, their investigation reveals truths about the town, their families, and themselves that neither of them are ready for. As the danger intensifies, they realize that their growing feelings for each other could be a light in the darkness.

The Turnout • Megan Abbott • Putnam’s Son • 3 août • 352 pages

Ballet flows through their veins. Dara and Marie Durant were dancers since birth, with their long necks and matching buns and pink tights, homeschooled and trained by their mother. Decades later the Durant School of Dance is theirs. The two sisters, together with Charlie, Dara’s husband and once their mother’s prize student, inherited the school after their parents died in a tragic accident nearly a dozen years ago. Marie, warm and soft, teaches the younger students; Dara, with her precision, trains the older ones; and Charlie, back broken after years of injuries, rules over the back office. Circling around each other, the three have perfected a dance, six days a week, that keeps the studio thriving. But when a suspicious accident occurs, just at the onset of the school’s annual performance of The Nutcracker, a season of competition, anxiety, and exhilaration, an interloper arrives and threatens the delicate balance of everything they’ve worked for.

Once there were wolves • Charlotte McConaghy • Flatiron Books • 3 août • 272 pages

Inti Flynn arrives in Scotland with her twin sister, Aggie, to lead a team of biologists tasked with reintroducing fourteen gray wolves into the remote Highlands. She hopes to heal not only the dying landscape, but Aggie, too, unmade by the terrible secrets that drove the sisters out of Alaska.

Inti is not the woman she once was, either, changed by the harm she’s witnessed—inflicted by humans on both the wild and each other. Yet as the wolves surprise everyone by thriving, Inti begins to let her guard down, even opening herself up to the possibility of love. But when a farmer is found dead, Inti knows where the town will lay blame. Unable to accept her wolves could be responsible, Inti makes a reckless decision to protect them. But if the wolves didn’t make the kill, then who did? And what will Inti do when the man she is falling for seems to be the prime suspect?

The family plot • Megan Collins • Atria Books • 17 août • 320 pages

At twenty-six, Dahlia Lighthouse has a lot to learn when it comes to the real world. Raised in a secluded island mansion deep in the woods and kept isolated by her true crime-obsessed parents, she has spent the last several years living on her own, but unable to move beyond her past—especially the disappearance of her twin brother Andy when they were sixteen.

With her father’s death, Dahlia returns to the house she has avoided for years. But as the rest of the Lighthouse family arrives for the memorial, a gruesome discovery is made: buried in the reserved plot is another body—Andy’s, his skull split open with an ax.

Each member of the family handles the revelation in unusual ways. Her brother Charlie pours his energy into creating a family memorial museum, highlighting their research into the lives of famous murder victims; her sister Tate forges ahead with her popular dioramas portraying crime scenes; and their mother affects a cheerfully domestic façade, becoming unrecognizable as the woman who performed murder reenactments for her children. As Dahlia grapples with her own grief and horror, she realizes that her eccentric family, and the mansion itself, may hold the answers to what happened to her twin.

In my dreams I hold a knife • Ashley Winstead • Sourcebooks Landmark • 31 août • 368 pages

A college reunion turns dark and deadly in this chilling and propulsive suspense novel about six friends, one unsolved murder, and the dark secrets they’ve been hiding from each other—and themselves—for a decade.

Ten years after graduation, Jessica Miller has planned her triumphant return to southern, elite Duquette University, down to the envious whispers that are sure to follow in her wake. Everyone is going to see the girl she wants them to see—confident, beautiful, indifferent—not the girl she was when she left campus, back when Heather’s murder fractured everything, including the tight bond linking the six friends she’d been closest to since freshman year. Ten years ago, everything fell apart, including the dreams she worked for her whole life—and her relationship with the one person she wasn’t supposed to love.

But not everyone is ready to move on. Not everyone left Duquette ten years ago, and not everyone can let Heather’s murder go unsolved. Someone is determined to trap the real killer, to make the guilty pay. When the six friends are reunited, they will be forced to confront what happened that night—and the years’ worth of secrets each of them would do anything to keep hidden.

The Witch Haven • Sasha Peyton Smith • Simon & Schuster • 31 août • 448 pages

In 1911 New York City, seventeen-year-old Frances Hallowell spends her days as a seamstress, mourning the mysterious death of her brother months prior. Everything changes when she’s attacked and a man ends up dead at her feet—her scissors in his neck, and she can’t explain how they got there.

Before she can be condemned as a murderess, two cape-wearing nurses arrive to inform her she is deathly ill and ordered to report to Haxahaven Sanitarium. But Frances finds Haxahaven isn’t a sanitarium at all: it’s a school for witches. Within Haxahaven’s glittering walls, Frances finds the sisterhood she craves, but the headmistress warns Frances that magic is dangerous. Frances has no interest in the small, safe magic of her school, and is instead enchanted by Finn, a boy with magic himself who appears in her dreams and tells her he can teach her all she’s been craving to learn, lessons that may bring her closer to discovering what truly happened to her brother.

Frances’s newfound power attracts the attention of the leader of an ancient order who yearns for magical control of Manhattan. And who will stop at nothing to have Frances by his side. Frances must ultimately choose what matters more, justice for her murdered brother and her growing feelings for Finn, or the safety of her city and fellow witches. What price would she pay for power, and what if the truth is more terrible than she ever imagined?

The woods are always watching • Stephanie Perkins • Dutton Books • 31 août • 304 pages

A traditional backwoods horror story set–first page to last–in the woods of the Pisgah National Forest in the Blue Ridge Mountains.

Two girls go backpacking in the woods. Things go very wrong.

And, then, their paths collide with a serial killer. 

The bookseller’s secret • Michelle Gable • Graydon House • 17 août • 400 pages

In 1942, London, Nancy Mitford is worried about more than air raids and German spies. Still recovering from a devastating loss, the once sparkling Bright Young Thing is estranged from her husband, her allowance has been cut, and she’s given up her writing career. On top of this, her five beautiful but infamous sisters continue making headlines with their controversial politics.

Eager for distraction and desperate for income, Nancy jumps at the chance to manage the Heywood Hill bookshop while the owner is away at war. Between the shop’s brisk business and the literary salons she hosts for her eccentric friends, Nancy’s life seems on the upswing. But when a mysterious French officer insists that she has a story to tell, Nancy must decide if picking up the pen again and revealing all is worth the price she might be forced to pay.

Eighty years later, Heywood Hill is abuzz with the hunt for a lost wartime manuscript written by Nancy Mitford. For one woman desperately in need of a change, the search will reveal not only a new side to Nancy, but an even more surprising link between the past and present…

The Women of Troy • Pat Baker • Doubleday • 24 août • 304 pages

Troy has fallen. The Greeks have won their bitter war. They can return home victors, loaded with their spoils: their stolen gold, stolen weapons, stolen women. All they need is a good wind to lift their sails.

But the wind does not come. The gods have been offended – the body of Priam lies desecrated, unburied – and so the victors remain in limbo, camped in the shadow of the city they destroyed, pacing at the edge of an unobliging sea. And, in these empty, restless days, the hierarchies that held them together begin to fray, old feuds resurface and new suspicions fester.

Largely unnoticed by her squabbling captors, Briseis remains in the Greek encampment. She forges alliances where she can – with young, dangerously naïve Amina, with defiant, aged Hecuba, with Calchus, the disgraced priest – and begins to see the path to a kind of revenge. Briseis has survived the Trojan War, but peacetime may turn out to be even more dangerous…

The Real Valkyrie: The Hidden History of Viking Warrior Women • Nancy Marie Brown • St Martin’s Press • 31 août • 336 pages

In 2017, DNA tests revealed to the collective shock of many scholars that a Viking warrior in a high-status grave in Birka, Sweden was actually a woman. The Real Valkyrie weaves together archaeology, history, and literature to imagine her life and times, showing that Viking women had more power and agency than historians have imagined.

Brown uses science to link the Birka warrior, whom she names Hervor, to Viking trading towns and to their great trade route east to Byzantium and beyond. She imagines her life intersecting with larger-than-life but real women, including Queen Gunnhild Mother-of-Kings, the Viking leader known as The Red Girl, and Queen Olga of Kyiv. Hervor’s short, dramatic life shows that much of what we have taken as truth about women in the Viking Age is based not on data, but on nineteenth-century Victorian biases. Rather than holding the household keys, Viking women in history, law, saga, poetry, and myth carry weapons. These women brag, “As heroes we were widely known—with keen spears we cut blood from bone.” In this compelling narrative Brown brings the world of those valkyries and shield-maids to vivid life.

The last Mona Lisa • Jonathan Santlofer • Sourcebook Landmark • 17 août • 400 pages

August, 1911: The Mona Lisa is stolen by Vincent Peruggia. Exactly what happens in the two years before its recovery is a mystery. Many replicas of the Mona Lisa exist, and more than one historian has wondered if the painting now in the Louvre is a fake, switched in 1911.

Present day: art professor Luke Perrone digs for the truth behind his most famous ancestor: Peruggia. His search attracts an Interpol detective with something to prove and an unfamiliar but curiously helpful woman. Soon, Luke tumbles deep into the world of art and forgery, a land of obsession and danger.

A gripping novel exploring the 1911 theft and the present underbelly of the art world, The Last Mona Lisa is a suspenseful tale, tapping into our universal fascination with da Vinci’s enigma, why people are driven to possess certain works of art, and our fascination with the authentic and the fake. 

Nick Setchfield • The War in the Dark (2018)

The War in the Dark • Nick Setchfield • Titan Books • Juillet 2018 • 352 pages

Europe. 1963. And the true Cold War is fought on the borders of this world, at the edges of the light.
 
When the assassination of a traitor trading with the enemy goes terribly wrong, British Intelligence agent Christopher Winter must flee London. In a tense alliance with a lethal, mysterious woman named Karina Lazarova, he’s caught in a quest for hidden knowledge from centuries before, an occult secret written in a language of fire. A secret that will give supremacy to the nation that possesses it.
 
Racing against the Russians, the chase takes them from the demon-haunted Hungarian border to treasure-laden tunnels beneath Berlin, from an impossible house in Vienna to a bomb-blasted ruin in Bavaria where something unholy waits, born of the power of white fire and black glass . . .
 
It’s a world of treachery, blood and magic. A world at war in the dark.


Je ne savais pas vraiment à quoi m’attendre avec ce roman. Ma liseuse ne me donne que le titre et la couverture et aucun résumé. Je me doutais que c’était un livre fantastique. Je l’ai donc commencé sans aucune attente particulière, alors que j’étais depuis quelques semaines dans une bonne panne de lecture. Finalement, j’ai été surprise par ce livre. Je ne le qualifierai pas de coup de coeur, mais The War in the Dark est un bon divertissement.

Il y a de l’ADN de Cassandra Clare dans ce premier tome. Ils ont sensiblement la même idée de départ : une guerre secrète qui dure depuis des millénaires entre les démons, qui cherchent à envahir notre monde et des sorciers et sociétés secrètes qui soit les aident, soit essaient de les en empêcher. Dans mon cas, ce genre d’histoire marche toujours. Nick Setchfield se démarque de Cassandra Clare en proposant un roman d’espionnage classique. Or, c’est rare de trouver un mélange de genre entre espionnage et fantastique. En tout cas, dans ce roman, je trouve que ça fonctionne étonnamment bien… Le tout sous fond de Guerre froide et de conflits entre les services secrets britannique et russe. Le contexte est d’autant plus parfait qu’il se prête bien à ce type d’intrigue.

Cette dernière est prenante et, dès les premières pages, j’ai été happée dans cette aventure pour retrouver un mystérieux manuscrit. J’ai aimé la construction du roman, un peu comme un jeu vidéo avec un lieu (généralement une ville), une péripétie (trouver un indice, un morceau de manuscrit ou une personne) et à la fin, les « méchants » qui tombent sur les deux personnages principaux, un peu à la manière des « boss » intermédiaires avant le grand final. Cela donne du rythme à l’histoire et, pour sortir d’une panne de lecture, c’est parfait ! Après, j’ai aussi conscience que, sur certains points, cela gâchait quelque peu le suspens, car le lecteur sait comment la séquence va se terminer. Cependant, il y a quelques révélations et rebondissements que je n’ai pas vu venir, notamment concernant le personnage principal, Christopher Winter.

Concernant les personnages, je n’ai pas eu de réel coup de coeur pour l’un ou l’autre. Je suis restée très en retrait en ce qui concerne leurs drames, les morts qu’ils croisent au gré de leur aventure. Même leur destin ne m’a pas plus intéressée que ça alors que les dernières pages laissent penser qu’ils s’en sont sortis difficilement. Cela a été pour moi le plus gros point négatif du roman. Le duo est également quelque peu cliché entre l’espion britannique gentleman et au passé sombre, et une espionne russe, maîtrisant parfaitement les techniques de combat, le maniement des armes, froide et prête à tout…

Il existe un deuxième tome, The Spider Game. Il n’est absolument pas dans mes priorités du moment. Ce premier livre a une fin relativement fermée pour se suffire à lui-même. Les principales questions sont répondues et il n’y aucun cliffhanger. The War in the Dark a été un roman divertissant, mais qui ne me laissera pas un souvenir impérissable.

Bilan des sorties VO lues • Janvier à Juin 2021

Depuis un peu plus d’un an, je propose un tour d’horizon des sorties VO (en anglais) qui me tentent énormément. J’en lis un certain nombre, mais sans toujours les chroniquer sur le blog. Le mois de Juin vient de toucher à sa fin et, avec lui, la moitié de l’année. L’occasion parfaite pour un petit bilan mi-parcours des parutions déjà lues et celles que j’aimerai encore découvrir.

En cliquant sur les mois, vous accédez à l’article sur les sorties VO correspondant.

Janvier

Livres lus

The House on Vesper Sands – Padraic O’Donnell

On the case is Inspector Cutter, a detective as sharp and committed to his work as he is wryly hilarious. Gideon Bliss, a Cambridge dropout in love with one of the missing girls, stumbles into a role as Cutter’s sidekick. And clever young journalist Octavia Hillingdon sees the case as a chance to tell a story that matters—despite her employer’s preference that she stick to a women’s society column. As Inspector Cutter peels back the mystery layer by layer, he leads them all, at last, to the secrets that lie hidden at the house on Vesper Sands.

J’avais hâte de pouvoir le lire, car il avait de bons arguments : un policier historique, la période victorienne, un meurtre qui semble mettre en oeuvre des forces occultes… Mais au bout d’un gros tiers, l’intrigue n’a toujours pas démarré et le livre commence à devenir trop lent et mon attention descendait en flèche. Même en dépassant la centaine de pages, je n’avais pas le sentiment que l’intrigue avait réellement commencé alors que quasiment un tiers était lu.

The Heiress, The Revelations of Anne de Bourgh – Molly Greeley

As a fussy baby, Anne de Bourgh’s doctor prescribed laudanum to quiet her, and now the young woman must take the opium-heavy tincture every day. Growing up sheltered and confined, removed from sunshine and fresh air, the pale and overly slender Anne grew up with few companions except her cousins, including Fitzwilliam Darcy. Throughout their childhoods, it was understood that Darcy and Anne would marry and combine their vast estates of Pemberley and Rosings. But Darcy does not love Anne or want her.

After her father dies unexpectedly, leaving her his vast fortune, Anne has a moment of clarity: what if her life of fragility and illness isn’t truly real? What if she could free herself from the medicine that clouds her sharp mind and leaves her body weak and lethargic? Might there be a better life without the medicine she has been told she cannot live without?

In a frenzy of desperation, Anne discards her laudanum and flees to the London home of her cousin, Colonel John Fitzwilliam, who helps her through her painful recovery. Yet once she returns to health, new challenges await. Shy and utterly inexperienced, the wealthy heiress must forge a new identity for herself, learning to navigate a “season” in society and the complexities of love and passion. The once wan, passive Anne gives way to a braver woman with a keen edge—leading to a powerful reckoning with the domineering mother determined to control Anne’s fortune . . . and her life.

Le livre prend place dans l’univers de Jane Austen et notamment Pride & Prejudice, en s’intéressant à la cousine de Fitzwilliam Darcy, Anne de Bourgh. Pas un coup de coeur car, malheureusement, le roman souffre de trop nombreuses longueurs. Cependant, Anne est un personnage attachant à suivre, surtout quand elle sort de son cocon. L’aspect historique est également bien développé.

Lore – Alexandra Bracken

Every seven years, the Agon begins. As punishment for a past rebellion, nine Greek gods are forced to walk the earth as mortals, hunted by the descendants of ancient bloodlines, all eager to kill a god and seize their divine power and immortality.

Long ago, Lore Perseous fled that brutal world in the wake of her family’s sadistic murder by a rival line, turning her back on the hunt’s promises of eternal glory. For years she’s pushed away any thought of revenge against the man–now a god–responsible for their deaths.

Yet as the next hunt dawns over New York City, two participants seek out her help: Castor, a childhood friend of Lore believed long dead, and a gravely wounded Athena, among the last of the original gods.

The goddess offers an alliance against their mutual enemy and, at last, a way for Lore to leave the Agon behind forever. But Lore’s decision to bind her fate to Athena’s and rejoin the hunt will come at a deadly cost–and still may not be enough to stop the rise of a new god with the power to bring humanity to its knees.

Lore est un roman d’action qui s’inspire de la mythologie grecque. Ce n’est pas totalement un coup de coeur, mais j’ai vraiment passé un bon moment. Il y a une bonne dose d’actions, de rebondissements… L’idée de départ est originale et bien développée.

Don’t tell a soul – Kirsten Miller

All Bram wanted was to disappear—from her old life, her family’s past, and from the scandal that continues to haunt her. The only place left to go is Louth, the tiny town on the Hudson River where her uncle, James, has been renovating an old mansion. But James is haunted by his own ghosts. Months earlier, his beloved wife died in a fire that people say was set by her daughter. The tragedy left James a shell of the man Bram knew—and destroyed half the house he’d so lovingly restored.

The manor is creepy, and so are the locals. The people of Louth don’t want outsiders like Bram in their town, and with each passing day she’s discovering that the rumors they spread are just as disturbing as the secrets they hide. Most frightening of all are the legends they tell about the Dead Girls. Girls whose lives were cut short in the very house Bram now calls home. The terrifying reality is that the Dead Girls may have never left the manor. And if Bram looks too hard into the town’s haunted past, she might not either.

En un seul mot… Creepy. L’histoire est dérangeante à souhaite et il y a quelques moments qui font bien frissonner. Il m’est arrivé à plusieurs reprises de devoir le mettre de côté, quand j’étais toute seule en soirée. L’auteur maîtrise parfaitement le suspens et à chaque page tournée, je voulais connaître la vérité, car il y avait quelques bizarreries qui interviennent durant la lecture… J’ai adoré l’évolution de l’intrigue et le livre est un coup de coeur.

Ceux que j’aimerais lire

Our darkest night de Jennifer Robson ; The Divines d’Ellie Eaton ; The last garden in England de Julia Kelly ; Faye, faraway d’Helen Fisher ; The Historians de Cecilia Eckbäck ; In the garden of spite de Camilla Bruce ; The Children’s train de Viola Ardone.

Février

Livres lus

The Paris Dressmaker – Kristy Cambron

Paris, 1939. Maison Chanel has closed, thrusting haute couture dressmaker Lila de Laurent out of the world of high fashion as Nazi soldiers invade the streets and the City of Lights slips into darkness. Lila’s life is now a series of rations, brutal restrictions, and carefully controlled propaganda while Paris is cut off from the rest of the world. Yet in hidden corners of the city, the faithful pledge to resist. Lila is drawn to La Resistance and is soon using her skills as a dressmaker to infiltrate the Nazi elite. She takes their measurements and designs masterpieces, all while collecting secrets in the glamorous Hôtel Ritz—the heart of the Nazis’ Parisian headquarters. But when dashing René Touliard suddenly reenters her world, Lila finds her heart tangled between determination to help save his Jewish family and bolstering the fight for liberation.

Paris, 1943. Sandrine Paquet’s job is to catalog the priceless works of art bound for the Führer’s Berlin, masterpieces stolen from prominent Jewish families. But behind closed doors, she secretly forages for information from the underground resistance. Beneath her compliant façade lies a woman bent on uncovering the fate of her missing husband . . . but at what cost? As Hitler’s regime crumbles, Sandrine is drawn in deeper when she uncrates an exquisite blush Chanel gown concealing a cryptic message that may reveal the fate of a dressmaker who vanished from within the fashion elite.

Je ressors extrêmement déçue par ce roman. En soi, il avait de quoi me plaire : la mode et plus particulièrement la Maison Chanel, Paris sous l’Occupation, la Résistance et le destin de deux femmes… Malheureusement, l’auteur alterne non seulement les deux points de vue, et deux époques différentes : le début de la guerre et 1944. Cela fait quatre trames différentes, et elles ne sont pas d’égal intérêt. J’ai eu du mal à m’attacher à Simone et Lila.

The Shadow War – Lindsay Smith

World War II is raging, and five teens are looking to make a mark. Daniel and Rebeka seek revenge against the Nazis who slaughtered their family; Simone is determined to fight back against the oppressors who ruined her life and corrupted her girlfriend; Phillip aims to prove that he’s better than his worst mistakes; and Liam is searching for a way to control the portal to the shadow world he’s uncovered, and the monsters that live within it–before the Nazi regime can do the same. When the five meet, and begrudgingly team up, in the forests of Germany, none of them knows what their future might hold.

As they race against time, war, and enemies from both this world and another, Liam, Daniel, Rebeka, Phillip, and Simone know that all they can count on is their own determination and will to survive. With their world turned upside down, and the shadow realm looming ominously large–and threateningly close–the course of history and the very fate of humanity rest in their hands. Still, the most important question remains: Will they be able to save it?

Il y a de bonnes idées : la Seconde Guerre mondiale, des forces occultes et un monde parallèle, une mission impossible… L’intrigue possède beaucoup trop de personnages et de points de vues différents pour que la lecture soit agréable. Je m’y perdais. Par ailleurs, les personnages sont plus des archétypes que réellement travaillés et nuancés. L’histoire traine en longueur alors que je m’attendais à plus d’action.

The Witch’s Heart – Genevieve Gornichec

Angrboda’s story begins where most witches’ tales end: with a burning. A punishment from Odin for refusing to provide him with knowledge of the future, the fire leaves Angrboda injured and powerless, and she flees into the farthest reaches of a remote forest. There she is found by a man who reveals himself to be Loki, and her initial distrust of him transforms into a deep and abiding love.

Their union produces three unusual children, each with a secret destiny, who Angrboda is keen to raise at the edge of the world, safely hidden from Odin’s all-seeing eye. But as Angrboda slowly recovers her prophetic powers, she learns that her blissful life—and possibly all of existence—is in danger.

With help from the fierce huntress Skadi, with whom she shares a growing bond, Angrboda must choose whether she’ll accept the fate that she’s foreseen for her beloved family…or rise to remake their future. From the most ancient of tales this novel forges a story of love, loss, and hope for the modern age.

J’adore les réécritures, que ce soit de contes ou de la mythologique. Genevieve Gornichec s’inspire d’une des épouses de Loki, Angrboda la sorcière. Ce type d’ouvrages se veut dans une lignée féministe, mais il rate quelque peu son effet. J’en ai lu la moitié avant d’abandonner. Le livre a été d’un tel ennui que je suis même étonnée d’avoir eu la patience de tenir jusque là.

Ceux que j’aimerais lire

While Paris slept de Ruth Druart ; The house upstairs de Julia Fine ; The invisible woman d’Erika Robuck ; A history of what come next de Sylvain Neuvel ; All Girls d’Emily Layden ; The kitchen front de Jennifer Ryan.

Mars

Livres lus

After Alice felll – Kim Taylor Blakemore

New Hampshire, 1865. Marion Abbott is summoned to Brawders House asylum to collect the body of her sister, Alice. She’d been found dead after falling four stories from a steep-pitched roof. Officially: an accident. Confidentially: suicide. But Marion believes a third option: murder.

Returning to her family home to stay with her brother and his second wife, the recently widowed Marion is expected to quiet her feelings of guilt and grief—to let go of the dead and embrace the living. But that’s not easy in this house full of haunting memories. Just when the search for the truth seems hopeless, a stranger approaches Marion with chilling words: I saw her fall.

Now Marion is more determined than ever to find out what happened that night at Brawders, and why. With no one she can trust, Marion may risk her own life to uncover the secrets buried with Alice in the family plot. 

Un roman rempli de secrets de famille avec une atmosphère loure. Malgré quelques lenteurs qui peuvent parfois ponctuer le livre, les pages se tournent facilement, car l’envie de savoir ce qui est arrivé à Alice est plus forte, tout comme celle de découvrir le ou les secrets du frère de Marion et de son épouse. Pas un coup de coeur, mais une bonne lecture.

The Women of Château Lafayette – Stephanie Dray

A founding mother…
1774. Gently-bred noblewoman Adrienne Lafayette becomes her husband’s political partner in the fight for American independence. But when their idealism sparks revolution in France and the guillotine threatens everything she holds dear, Adrienne must choose to renounce the complicated man she loves, or risk her life for a legacy that will inspire generations to come.

A daring visionary…
1914. Glittering New York socialite Beatrice Astor Chanler is a force of nature, daunted by nothing–not her humble beginnings, her crumbling marriage, or the outbreak of war. But after witnessing the devastation in France and delivering war-relief over dangerous seas, Beatrice takes on the challenge of a lifetime: convincing America to fight for what’s right.

A reluctant resistor…
1940. French school-teacher and aspiring artist Marthe Simone has an orphan’s self-reliance and wants nothing to do with war. But as the realities of Nazi occupation transform her life in the isolated castle where she came of age, she makes a discovery that calls into question who she is, and more importantly, who she is willing to become. 

Lafayette revient à la mode après la sortie de la comédie musicale Hamilton. Stephanie Dray en fait l’élément central de son nouveau roman en explorant le destin de trois femmes durant la Révolution française, la Première et la Deuxième Guerre mondiale. Même si les époques sont totalement différentes pour ne pas être confondues, certaines sont plus intéressantes que d’autres. Néanmoins, cela reste un livre que j’ai abandonné.

Ceux que j’aimerais lire

Under the light of the Italian moon de Jennifer Anton ; Vera de Carol Edgarian ; The lost village de Camilla Sten ; The Rose Code de Kate Quinn ; The lost apothecary de Sarah Penner.

Avril

Livres lus

Sistersong – Lucy Holland

535 AD. In the ancient kingdom of Dumnonia, King Cador’s children inherit a fragmented land abandoned by the Romans.

Riva, scarred in a terrible fire, fears she will never heal.
Keyne battles to be seen as the king’s son, when born a daughter.
And Sinne, the spoiled youngest girl, yearns for romance.

All three fear a life of confinement within the walls of the hold – a last bastion of strength against the invading Saxons. But change comes on the day ash falls from the sky, bringing Myrddhin, meddler and magician, and Tristan, a warrior whose secrets will tear the siblings apart. Riva, Keyne and Sinne must take fate into their own hands, or risk being tangled in a story they could never have imagined; one of treachery, love and ultimately, murder. It’s a story that will shape the destiny of Britain.

Le résumé me faisait penser à une pièce de Shakespeare : trois soeurs aux destins différentes et dramatiques. J’ai adoré suivre l’histoire de ces soeurs, d’apprendre à les connaître, leurs secrets, leurs rêves et leurs espoirs. Elles sont différentes et je ne saurai dire laquelle a été ma préférée. Elles m’ont plu pour des raisons diverses. J’ai adoré à la fois le contexte historique (la Grande-Bretagne après la chute de l’Empire romain) et fantastique (la présence de magie et de Merlin). Le coup de coeur n’était pas loin, mais c’est un très bon roman que je ne regrette pas d’avoir découvert.

Ceux que j’aimerais lire

Ariadne de Jennifer Saint ; Near the bone de Christina Henry ; Ophelia de Norman Bacal ; The Mary Shelley Club de Goldy Moldavsky ; The last bookshop of London de Madeline Martin ; The Dictionnary of lost words de Pip Williams.

Mai

Ceux que j’aimerais lire

The Radio Operator d’Ulla Lenze ; Madam de Phoebe Wynne ; The lights of Prague de Nicole Jarvis.

Juin

Ceux que j’aimerais lire

The Wolf and the Woodsman d’Ava Reid ; Daughter of Sparta de Claire M. Andrews ; The nature of the witches de Rachel Griffin ; The Maidens d’Alex Michaelides ; For the Wolf d’Hannah F. Whitten.

Top 5 Wednesday • Long series

Le thème du jour propose de parler de nos séries littéraires préférées. Elles doivent contenir plus de trois tomes, pour être considérée comme une série longue.

Peter Grant – Ben Aaronovitch

Probationary Constable Peter Grant dreams of being a detective in London’s Metropolitan Police. Too bad his superior plans to assign him to the Case Progression Unit, where the biggest threat he’ll face is a paper cut. But Peter’s prospects change in the aftermath of a puzzling murder, when he gains exclusive information from an eyewitness who happens to be a ghost. Peter’s ability to speak with the lingering dead brings him to the attention of Detective Chief Inspector Thomas Nightingale, who investigates crimes involving magic and other manifestations of the uncanny. Now, as a wave of brutal and bizarre murders engulfs the city, Peter is plunged into a world where gods and goddesses mingle with mortals and a long-dead evil is making a comeback on a rising tide of magic.

C’est une série que j’aime énormément et qui comprend une dizaine de tomes. J’en ai déjà lu six et je suis en train de la terminer, doucement mais sûrement. J’adore cette histoire qui devient de plus en plus sombre au fur et à mesure et qui contient de nombreuses références à la pop culture anglaise et des touches d’humour anglais divines.

Les Rougon-Macquart – Émile Zola

Dans la petite ville provençale de Plassans, au lendemain du coup d’État d’où va naître le Second Empire, deux adolescents, Miette et Silvère, se mêlent aux insurgés. Leur histoire d’amour comme le soulèvement des républicains traversent le roman, mais au-delà d’eux, c’est aussi la naissance d’une famille qui se trouve évoquée : les Rougon en même temps que les Macquart dont la double lignée, légitime et bâtarde, descend de la grand-mère de Silvère, Tante Dide. Et entre Pierre Rougon et son demi-frère Antoine Macquart, la lutte rapidement va s’ouvrir. Premier roman de la longue série des Rougon-Macquart, La Fortune des Rougon que Zola fait paraître en 1871 est bien le roman des origines. Au moment où s’installe le régime impérial que l’écrivain pourfend, c’est ici que commence la patiente conquête du pouvoir et de l’argent, une lente ascension familiale qui doit faire oublier les commencements sordides, dans la misère et dans le crime.

En une vingtaine de tomes, Émile Zola évoque une famille et ses descendants dans la France du Second Empire. J’en suis quasiment à la moitié et, de manière générale, j’ai aimé chacun des tomes pour des raisons différentes.

Soleil Noir – Éric Giacometti et Jacques Ravenne

Dans une Europe au bord de l’abîme, une organisation nazie, l’Ahnenerbe, pille des lieux sacrés à travers le monde. Ils cherchent à amasser des trésors aux pouvoirs obscurs destinés à établir le règne millénaire du Troisième Reich. Son maître, Himmler, envoie des SS fouiller un sanctuaire tibétain dans une vallée oubliée de l’Himalaya. Il se rend lui-même en Espagne, dans un monastère, pour chercher un tableau énigmatique. De quelle puissance ancienne les nazis croient-ils détenir la clé ? À Londres, Churchill découvre que la guerre contre l’Allemagne sera aussi la guerre spirituelle de la lumière contre l’occulte. Ce livre est le premier tome d’une saga où l’histoire occulte fait se rencontrer les acteurs majeurs de la Seconde Guerre mondiale et des personnages aux destins d’exception : Tristan, le trafiquant d’art au passé trouble, Erika, une archéologue allemande, Laure, l’héritière des Cathares…

Le quatrième tome vient de sortir et j’ai déjà lu les trois premiers. C’est une série prenante autour de reliques, d’archéologie, d’aventures…

Erica Falck – Camilla Läckberg

Erica Falck, trente-cinq ans, auteur de biographies installée dans une petite ville paisible de la côte ouest suédoise, découvre le cadavre aux poignets tailladés d’une amie d’enfance, Alexandra Wijkner, nue dans une baignoire d’eau gelée. Impliquée malgré elle dans l’enquête (à moins qu’une certaine tendance naturelle à fouiller la vie des autres ne soit ici à l’œuvre), Erica se convainc très vite qu’il ne s’agit pas d’un suicide. Sur ce point – et sur beaucoup d’autres -, l’inspecteur Patrik Hedström, amoureux transi, la rejoint.

À la conquête de la vérité, stimulée par un amour naissant, Erica, enquêtrice au foyer façon Desperate Housewives, plonge clans les strates d’une petite société provinciale qu’elle croyait bien connaître et découvre ses secrets, d’autant plus sombres que sera bientôt trouvé le corps d’un peintre clochard – autre mise en scène de suicide.

J’ai le troisième et quatrième tomes dans ma pile à lire et il m’en reste encore une dizaine avant de terminer la série. J’ai beaucoup aimé les deux premiers et j’ai véritablement envie de la continuer.

Bernie Gunther – Philip Kerr

Publiés pour la première fois dans les années 1989-1991, L’été de cristal, La pâle figure et Un requiem allemand évoquent l’ambiance du Ille Reich en 1936 et 1938, et ses décombres en 1947 Ils ont pour héros Bernie Gunther, ex-commissaire de la police berlinoise devenu détective privé. Désabusé et courageux, perspicace et insolent, Bernie est à l’Allemagne nazie ce que Phil Marlowe était à la Californie de la fin des années 30 : un homme solitaire témoin de la cupidité et de la cruauté humaines, qui nous tend le miroir d’un lieu et d’une époque. Des rues de Berlin  » nettoyées  » pour offrir une image idyllique aux visiteurs des Jeux olympiques, à celles de Vienne la corrompue, théâtre après la guerre d’un ballet de tractations pour le moins démoralisant, Bernie va enquêter au milieu d’actrices et de prostituées, de psychiatres et de banquiers, de producteurs de cinéma et de publicitaires. Mais là où la Trilogie se démarque d’un film noir hollywoodien, c’est que les rôles principaux y sont tenus par des vedettes en chair et en os : Heydrich, Himmler et Goering…

Une de mes séries préférées. Plus d’une dizaine de tomes, un personnage attachant et une série allant des années 20 jusqu’aux années 60. Chaque livre est très largement documenté. Il me manque le dernier tome à découvrir.

Top 5 Wednesday #2 • Family Dynamics

Le thème de cette semaine m’inspire énormément. Le 15 mai a eu lieu la journée mondiale de la famille, d’où ce sujet pour ce mercredi. Il est pris dans un sens très large, car il est autant question des liens du sang que de la famille que l’on se crée. J’ai essayé, dans la mesure du possible, de piocher dans mes récentes lectures. La semaine dernière, sur le thème des « lieux communs », j’écrivais que j’aimais beaucoup les sagas familiales… Cet article est un peu la continuité de ce dernier.

Thème : Family dynamics

Among the leaving and the dead d’Inara Verzemnieks

Inara Verzemnieks was raised by her Latvian grandparents in Washington State, among expatriates who scattered smuggled Latvian sand over coffins, the children singing folk songs about a land none of them had visited. Her grandmother Livija’s stories vividly recreated the home she fled during the Second World War, when she was separated from her sister, Ausma, whom she wouldn’t see again for more than fifty years.

Journeying back to their remote village, Inara comes to know Ausma and her trauma as an exile to Siberia under Stalin, while reconstructing Livija’s survival through her years as a refugee. In uniting their stories, Inara honors both sisters in a haunting and luminous account of loss, survival, resilience, and love.

Cet ouvrage est un plus un essai autour de la famille, l’importance de cette dernière dans la construction d’un individu et de son histoire. L’auteur écrit à propos de sa grand-mère et de la soeur de cette dernière, de sa volonté de comprendre ses racines, leurs histoires. Il est dommage que parfois l’écriture poétique et lyrique de l’auteur prend trop le pas sur le sujet abordé, apportant des longueurs.

L’Assommoir d’Émile Zola

Qu’est-ce qui nous fascine dans la vie « simple et tranquille » de Gervaise Macquart ? Pourquoi le destin de cette petite blanchisseuse montée de Provence à Paris nous touche-t-il tant aujourd’hui encore? Que nous disent les exclus du quartier de la Goutte-d’Or version Second Empire? L’existence douloureuse de Gervaise est avant tout une passion où s’expriment une intense volonté de vivre, une générosité sans faille, un sens aigu de l’intimité comme de la fête. Et tant pis si, la fatalité aidant, divers « assommoirs » – un accident de travail, l’alcool, les « autres », la faim – ont finalement raison d’elle et des siens. Gervaise aura parcouru une glorieuse trajectoire dans sa déchéance même. Relisons L’Assommoir, cette « passion de Gervaise », cet étonnant chef-d’oeuvre, avec des yeux neufs.

Comment ne pas parler de dynamiques familiales sans évoquer Zola ? Sa série Les Rougon-Macquart rentre pleinement dans cette catégorique. Elle est en l’exemple même, car Zola étudie à travers une famille les prédispositions à l’alcoolisme, par exemple, ou à la folie… J’en suis au septième tome, L’Assommoir et jusqu’à présent, rares sont les tomes qui m’ont déçue.

After Alice fell de Kim Taylor Blackemore

New Hampshire, 1865. Marion Abbott is summoned to Brawders House asylum to collect the body of her sister, Alice. She’d been found dead after falling four stories from a steep-pitched roof. Officially: an accident. Confidentially: suicide. But Marion believes a third option: murder.

Returning to her family home to stay with her brother and his second wife, the recently widowed Marion is expected to quiet her feelings of guilt and grief—to let go of the dead and embrace the living. But that’s not easy in this house full of haunting memories.

Just when the search for the truth seems hopeless, a stranger approaches Marion with chilling words: I saw her fall.

Now Marion is more determined than ever to find out what happened that night at Brawders, and why. With no one she can trust, Marion may risk her own life to uncover the secrets buried with Alice in the family plot.

Sorti cette année, ce roman serait presque un huis clos au sein d’une famille. En effet, la mort de la plus jeune soeur, Alice, rend les relations tendues entre Marion et son frère et sa belle-soeur. Il n’y a pas que la mort de la plus jeune des soeurs qui empoisonne l’atmosphère, mais bien d’autres sombres secrets. C’est un roman que j’ai beaucoup aimé.

Quand Hitler s’empara du lapin rose de Judith Kerr

Imaginez que le climat se détériore dans votre pays, au point que certains citoyens soient menacés dans leur existence. Imaginez surtout que votre père se trouve être l’un de ces citoyens et qu’il soit obligé d’abandonner tout et de partir sur-le-champ, pour éviter la prison et même la mort. C’est l’histoire d’Anna dans l’Allemagne nazie d’Adolf Hitler. Elle a neuf ans et ne s’occupe guère que de crayons de couleur, de visites au zoo avec son « oncle » Julius et de glissades dans la neige. Brutalement les choses changent. Son père disparaît sans prévenir. Puis, elle-même et le reste de sa famille s’expatrient pour le rejoindre à l’étranger. Départ de Berlin qui ressemble à une fuite. Alors commence la vie dure – mais non sans surprises – de réfugiés. D’abord la Suisse, près de Zurich. Puis Paris. Enfin Londres. Odyssée pleine de fatigues et d’angoisses mais aussi de pittoresque et d’imprévu – et toujours drôles – d’Anna et de son frère Max affrontant l’inconnu et contraints de vaincre toutes sortes de difficultés – dont la première et non la moindre: celle des langues étrangères! Ce récit autobiographique de Judith Kerr nous enchante par l’humour qui s’en dégage, et nous touche par cette particulière vibration de ton propre aux souvenirs de famille, quand il apparaît que la famille fut une de celles où l’on s’aime…

J’ai déjà eu l’occasion d’évoquer ce roman et son adaptation cinématographique sur le blog. [lien] C’est une très belle histoire d’une famille qui reste unie malgré les épreuves et qui fait preuve d’une grande résilience. Il y a un beau message dans ce roman, où la famille, le fait de rester ensemble malgré les difficultés sont les choses les plus importantes.

Guerre & Paix de Léon Tolstoï

1805 à Moscou, en ces temps de paix fragile, les Bolkonsky, les Rostov et les Bézoukhov constituent les personnages principaux d’une chronique familiale. Une fresque sociale où l’aristocratie, de Moscou à Saint-Pétersbourg, entre grandeur et misérabilisme, se prend au jeu de l’ambition sociale, des mesquineries, des premiers émois.

1812, la guerre éclate et peu à peu les personnages imaginaires évoluent au sein même des événements historiques. Le conte social, dépassant les ressorts de l’intrigue psychologique, prend une dimension d’épopée historique et se change en récit d’une époque. La “Guerre” selon Tolstoï, c’est celle menée contre Napoléon par l’armée d’Alexandre, c’est la bataille d’Austerlitz, l’invasion de la Russie, l’incendie de Moscou, puis la retraite des armées napoléoniennes.

Entre les deux romans de sa fresque, le portrait d’une classe sociale et le récit historique, Tolstoï tend une passerelle, livrant une réflexion philosophique sur le décalage de la volonté humaine aliénée à l’inéluctable marche de l’Histoire ou lorsque le destin façonne les hommes malgré eux.

Un autre auteur spécialisé dans les chroniques familiales, Léon Tolstoï. Dans ce récit, il s’intéresse à plusieurs familles de l’aristocratie russe. Il montre les relations au sein d’une même famille et celles qu’elles entretiennent entre elles. C’est une très bonne lecture que je recommande. Mon avis est disponible sur le blog. [lien]

Top 5 Wednesday #1 • Favorite Tropes

J’inaugure un nouveau rendez-vous sur le blog avec le Top 5 Wednesday. Je ne pense pas forcément participer toutes les semaines, mais si le thème me plait et me parle, c’est avec plaisir que j’y réagirai. Les sujets sont annoncés chaque mois sur le groupe Goodreads.

Thème : Favorite Tropes

Avant de me lancer dans cet article, j’ai fait quelques recherches sur ce terme de tropes et sur ce qu’il pouvait signifiait en français. Le meilleur terme que j’ai trouvé est celui de lieux communs. À titre d’exemples, dans les romances, ce seraient les fausses relations amoureuses ou tout ce qui touche à la royauté, les mariages de convenance… Pour le fantastique, ce sont les thématiques d’un•e Élu•e, sauver le monde… Pour mes cinq « lieux communs » préférés, j’ai essayé de tirer un exemple parmi mes plus récentes lectures, ou, du moins, depuis le début d’année.

1. La quête

L’exemple le plus parlant est sans conteste la quête du Graal. Je pense aussi au Seigneur des Anneaux de J.R.R. Tolkien. C’est un lieu commun que j’apprécie beaucoup. Dans mon esprit, il y a toujours le côté partir à l’aventure, aller vers l’inconnu, sortir de sa zone de confort… Le personnage principal va tirer des connaissances, des expériences de son voyage.

Un des derniers livres que j’ai pu lire et qui représente parfaitement cette idée de quête est le troisième tome de la série La Passe-Miroir, La mémoire de Babel. De manière général, la série raconte la quête d’Ophélie et Thorn pour découvrir l’identité de Dieu et l’arrêter.

Thorn a disparu depuis deux ans et demi et Ophélie désespère. Les indices trouvés dans le livre de Farouk et les informations livrées par Dieu mènent toutes à l’arche de Babel, dépositaire des archives mémorielles du monde. Ophélie décide de s’y rendre sous une fausse identité.

2. Une relique ou un artefact puissant•e

S’il est doublé d’une quête, c’est encore mieux ! Je pense que mon amour pour ce genre de lieux communs vient d’Indiana Jones, qui est présenté comme un chasseur de reliques et de trésor (même si, en réalité, il est plus un pilleur de tombes). Certaines d’entre elles ont des propriétés magiques. En littérature, il y a, à nouveau, la quête du Graal, ou les thrillers ésotériques, genres dont je raffole.

Et c’est justement un thriller ésotérique que je vais prendre en exemple avec une des mes toutes dernières lectures. Elle date du début du mois. Il s’agit du troisième tome de la dernière série d’Éric Giacometti et Jacques Ravenne, Soleil noir, La relique du chaos. Les reliques (très particulières pour le coup) ont un caractère mystique et magique.

Juillet 1942. Jamais l’issue du conflit n’a semblé aussi incertaine. Si l’Angleterre a écarté tout risque d’invasion, la Russie de Staline plie sous les coups de boutoir des armées d’Hitler. L’Europe est sur le point de basculer. À travers la quête des Swastikas, la guerre occulte se déchaîne pour tenter de faire pencher la balance. Celui qui s’emparera de l’objet sacré remportera la victoire. Tristan Marcas, agent double au passé obscur, part à la recherche du trésor des Romanov, qui cache, selon le dernier des tsars, l’ultime relique. À Berlin, Moscou et Londres, la course contre la montre est lancée, entraînant dans une spirale vertigineuse Erika, l’archéologue allemande et Laure, la jeune résistante française…

3. Un amour impossible

La faute à Roméo et Juliette de Shakespeare, qui est une de mes pièces préférées au monde. Je prend ce thème ou lieux commun dans un sens très large, car des raisons pour lesquelles un amour peut être impossible sont variées.

Un des derniers livres que j’ai lu et qui peut illustrer ce sujet est Follow me to ground de Sue Rainsford. Il s’agit d’une histoire d’amour entre une sorcière et un mortel qui est vu d’un mauvais oeil par les familles des deux protagonistes.

LIEN VERS L’ARTICLE

Ada and her father, touched by the power to heal illness, live on the edge of a village where they help sick locals—or “Cures”—by cracking open their damaged bodies or temporarily burying them in the reviving, dangerous Ground nearby. Ada, a being both more and less than human, is mostly uninterested in the Cures, until she meets a man named Samson. When they strike up an affair, to the displeasure of her father and Samson’s widowed, pregnant sister, Ada is torn between her old way of life and new possibilities with her lover—and eventually comes to a decision that will forever change Samson, the town, and the Ground itself.

4. Un conflit avec un dieu

C’est un lieu commun qui, pour le coup, brasse très large. Il me rappelle à la fois les récits bibliques, la mythologie grecque… Je pense aussi à des livres fantastiques ou de science-fiction, les réécritures autour des mythes et légendes.

Un livre que j’ai très récemment lu (et apprécié) et dans lequel l’intrigue a pour origine un conflit avec un dieu est Lore d’Alexandra Bracken. Le conflit est entre Zeus et les dieux, les anciens et les nouveaux dieux, les dieux avec les chasseurs… L’auteur s’inspire de la mythologie grecque.

Every seven years, the Agon begins. As punishment for a past rebellion, nine Greek gods are forced to walk the earth as mortals, hunted by the descendants of ancient bloodlines, all eager to kill a god and seize their divine power and immortality. Long ago, Lore Perseous fled that brutal world in the wake of her family’s sadistic murder by a rival line, turning her back on the hunt’s promises of eternal glory. For years she’s pushed away any thought of revenge against the man–now a god–responsible for their deaths.

Yet as the next hunt dawns over New York City, two participants seek out her help: Castor, a childhood friend of Lore believed long dead, and a gravely wounded Athena, among the last of the original gods.

The goddess offers an alliance against their mutual enemy and, at last, a way for Lore to leave the Agon behind forever. But Lore’s decision to bind her fate to Athena’s and rejoin the hunt will come at a deadly cost–and still may not be enough to stop the rise of a new god with the power to bring humanity to its knees.

5. Les sagas familiales

Je lis pas mal de sagas familiales, surtout par des auteurs russes. J’aime suivre le destin d’une famille sur une ou plusieurs générations. J’ai tellement d’exemples qui me viennent à l’esprit comme La saga moscovite de Vassily Axionov, Guerre & Paix de Léon Tolstoï (terminé en début d’année).

Cependant, si je dois prendre un exemple dans mes lectures très récentes, ce sont les Rougon-Macquart de Zola qui arrivent en premier. C’est aussi un des grands exemples de sagas familiales et celle-ci compte près de vingt tomes. Au début du mois, j’ai terminé le septième tome, L’Assommoir qui est un coup de coeur.

Qu’est-ce qui nous fascine dans la vie « simple et tranquille » de Gervaise Macquart ? Pourquoi le destin de cette petite blanchisseuse montée de Provence à Paris nous touche-t-il tant aujourd’hui encore ? Que nous disent les exclus du quartier de la Goutte-d’Or version Second Empire ? L’existence douloureuse de Gervaise est avant tout une passion où s’expriment une intense volonté de vivre, une générosité sans faille, un sens aigu de l’intimité comme de la fête. Et tant pis si, la fatalité aidant, divers «assommoirs» – un accident de travail, l’alcool, les «autres», la faim – ont finalement raison d’elle et des siens. Gervaise aura parcouru une glorieuse trajectoire dans sa déchéance même. Relisons L’Assommoir, cette «passion de Gervaise», cet étonnant chef-d’oeuvre, avec des yeux neufs.

Quels sont vos « lieux communs » préférés en littérature ? Quels en sont les meilleurs exemples ?