Sorties VO • Septembre 2021

Seven visitations of Sydney Burgess • Andy Marino • RedHook • 28 septembre • 304 pages

Sydney’s spent years burying her past and building a better life for herself and her eleven-year old son. A respectable marketing job, a house with reclaimed and sustainable furniture, and a boyfriend who loves her son and accepts her, flaws and all. But when she opens her front door, and a masked intruder knocks her briefly unconscious, everything begins to unravel. 

She wakes in the hospital and tells a harrowing story of escape. Of dashing out a broken window. Of running into her neighbors’ yard and calling the police. What the cops tell her is that she can no longer trust her memories. Because they say that not only is the intruder lying dead in her guest room, but he’s been murdered in a way that seems intimately personal. 

When she returns home, Sydney can’t shake the deep darkness that hides in every corner. There’s an unnatural whisper in her ear, urging her back to old addictions. And as her memories slowly return, she begins to fear that her new life was never built on solid ground-and that the secrets buried beneath will change everything. 

These toxic things • Rachel Howzell Hall • Thomas & Mercer • 1 septembre • 415 pages

Mickie Lambert creates “digital scrapbooks” for clients, ensuring that precious souvenirs aren’t forgotten or lost. When her latest client, Nadia Denham, a curio shop owner, dies from an apparent suicide, Mickie honors the old woman’s last wish and begins curating her peculiar objets d’art. A music box, a hair clip, a key chain―twelve mementos in all that must have meant so much to Nadia, who collected them on her flea market scavenges across the country.

But these tokens mean a lot to someone else, too. Mickie has been receiving threatening messages to leave Nadia’s past alone.

It’s becoming a mystery Mickie is driven to solve. Who once owned these odd treasures? How did Nadia really come to possess them? Discovering the truth means crossing paths with a long-dormant serial killer and navigating the secrets of a sinister past. One that might, Mickie fears, be inescapably entwined with her own.

The slow march of light • Heather B. Moore • Shadow Mountain • 7 septembre • 368 pages

In the summer of 1961, a wall of barbed wire goes up quickly in the dead of night, officially dividing Berlin. Aware of the many whose families have been divided, Luisa joins a secret spy network, risking her life to help East Germans escape across the Berlin Wall and into the West.

Bob Inama, a soldier in the US Army, is stationed in West Germany. He’s glad to be fluent in German, especially after meeting Luisa Voigt at a church social. As they spend time together, they form a close connection. But when Bob receives classified orders to leave for undercover work immediately, he doesn’t get the chance to say goodbye.

With a fake identity, Bob’s special assignment is to be a spy embedded in East Germany, identifying possible targets for the US military. But Soviet and East German spies, the secret police, and Stasi informants are everywhere, and the danger of being caught and sent to a brutal East German prison lurks on every corner.

The Collector’s Daughter • Gill Paul • William Morrow • 7 septembre • 384 pages

Lady Evelyn Herbert was the daughter of the Earl of Carnarvon, brought up in stunning Highclere Castle. Popular and pretty, she seemed destined for a prestigious marriage, but she had other ideas. Instead, she left behind the world of society balls and chaperones to travel to the Egyptian desert, where she hoped to become a lady archaeologist, working alongside her father and Howard Carter in the hunt for an undisturbed tomb.

In November 1922, their dreams came true when they discovered the burial place of Tutankhamun, packed full of gold and unimaginable riches, and she was the first person to crawl inside for three thousand years. She called it the “greatest moment” of her life—but soon afterwards everything changed, with a string of tragedies that left her world a darker, sadder place.

Newspapers claimed it was “the curse of Tutankhamun,” but Howard Carter said no rational person would entertain such nonsense. Yet fifty years later, when an Egyptian academic came asking questions about what really happened in the tomb, it unleashed a new chain of events that seemed to threaten the happiness Eve had finally found.

The Matzah Ball • Jean Meltzer • MIRA • 28 septembre • 416 pages

Rachel Rubenstein-Goldblatt is a nice Jewish girl with a shameful secret: she loves Christmas. For a decade she’s hidden her career as a Christmas romance novelist from her family. Her talent has made her a bestseller even as her chronic illness has always kept the kind of love she writes about out of reach.

But when her diversity-conscious publisher insists she write a Hanukkah romance, her well of inspiration suddenly runs dry. Hanukkah’s not magical. It’s not merry. It’s not Christmas. Desperate not to lose her contract, Rachel’s determined to find her muse at the Matzah Ball, a Jewish music celebration on the last night of Hanukkah, even if it means working with her summer camp archenemy—Jacob Greenberg.

Though Rachel and Jacob haven’t seen each other since they were kids, their grudge still glows brighter than a menorah. But as they spend more time together, Rachel finds herself drawn to Hanukkah—and Jacob—in a way she never expected. Maybe this holiday of lights will be the spark she needed to set her heart ablaze.

The Corpse Queen • Heather Herrman • GP Putnam • 14 septembre • 320 pages

Soon after her best friend Kitty mysteriously dies, orphaned seventeen-year-old Molly Green is sent away to live with her « aunt. » With no relations that she knows of, Molly assumes she has been sold as free domestic labor for the price of an extra donation in the church orphanage’s coffers. Such a thing is not unheard of. There are only so many options for an unmarried girl in 1850s Philadelphia. Only, when Molly arrives, she discovers her aunt is very much real, exceedingly wealthy, and with secrets of her own. Secrets and wealth she intends to share–for a price.

Molly’s estranged aunt Ava, has built her empire by robbing graves and selling the corpses to medical students who need bodies to practice surgical procedures. And she wants Molly to help her procure the corpses. As Molly learns her aunt’s trade in the dead of night and explores the mansion by day, she is both horrified and deeply intrigued by the anatomy lessons held at the old church on her aunt’s property. Enigmatic Doctor LaSalle’s lessons are a heady mixture of knowledge and power and Molly has never wanted anything more than to join his male-only group of students. But the cost of inclusion is steep and with a murderer loose in the city, the pursuit of power and opportunity becomes a deadly dance. 

The Magicians • Colm Toibin • Scribner • 7 septembre • 512 pages

Colm Tóibín’s new novel opens in a provincial German city at the turn of the twentieth century, where the boy, Thomas Mann, grows up with a conservative father, bound by propriety, and a Brazilian mother, alluring and unpredictable. Young Mann hides his artistic aspirations from his father and his homosexual desires from everyone. He is infatuated with one of the richest, most cultured Jewish families in Munich, and marries the daughter Katia. They have six children. On a holiday in Italy, he longs for a boy he sees on a beach and writes the story Death in Venice. He is the most successful novelist of his time, winner of the Nobel Prize in literature, a public man whose private life remains secret. He is expected to lead the condemnation of Hitler, whom he underestimates. His oldest daughter and son, leaders of Bohemianism and of the anti-Nazi movement, share lovers. He flees Germany for Switzerland, France and, ultimately, America, living first in Princeton and then in Los Angeles.

The Girl behind the wall • Mandy Robotham • Avon • 7 septembre • 416 pages

A city divided. When the Berlin Wall goes up, Karin is on the wrong side of the city. Overnight, she’s trapped under Soviet rule in unforgiving East Berlin and separated from her twin sister, Jutta.

Two sisters torn apart. Karin and Jutta lead parallel lives for years, cut off by the Wall. But Karin finds one reason to keep going: Otto, the man who gives her hope, even amidst the brutal East German regime.

One impossible choice… When Jutta finds a hidden way through the wall, the twins are reunited. But the Stasi have eyes everywhere, and soon Karin is faced with a terrible decision: to flee to the West and be with her sister, or sacrifice it all to follow her heart?

The last legacy • Adrienne Young • Wednesday Books • 7 septembre • 336 pages

When a letter from her uncle Henrik arrives on Bryn Roth’s eighteenth birthday, summoning her back to Bastian, Bryn is eager to prove herself and finally take her place in her long-lost family.

Henrik has plans for Bryn, but she must win everyone’s trust if she wants to hold any power in the delicate architecture of the family. It doesn’t take long for her to see that the Roths are entangled in shadows. Despite their growing influence in upscale Bastian, their hands are still in the kind of dirty business that got Bryn’s parents killed years ago. With a forbidden romance to contend with and dangerous work ahead, the cost of being accepted into the Roths may be more than Bryn can pay. 

All these bodies • Kendare Blake • Quill Tree Books • 16 septembre • 304 pages

Summer 1958—a string of murders plagues the Midwest. The victims are found in their cars and in their homes—even in their beds—their bodies drained, but with no blood anywhere. 

September 19- the Carlson family is slaughtered in their Minnesota farmhouse, and the case gets its first lead: 15-year-old Marie Catherine Hale is found at the scene. She is covered in blood from head to toe, and at first she’s mistaken for a survivor. But not a drop of the blood is hers.

Michael Jensen, son of the local sheriff, yearns to become a journalist and escape his small-town. He never imagined that the biggest story in the country would fall into his lap, or that he would be pulled into the investigation, when Marie decides that he is the only one she will confess to. 

As Marie recounts her version of the story, it falls to Michael to find the truth: What really happened the night that the Carlsons were killed? And how did one girl wind up in the middle of all these bodies? 

Summers Sons • Lee Mandelo • Tordotcom • 28 septembre • 384 pages

Andrew and Eddie did everything together, best friends bonded more deeply than brothers, until Eddie left Andrew behind to start his graduate program at Vanderbilt. Six months later, only days before Andrew was to join him in Nashville, Eddie dies of an apparent suicide. He leaves Andrew a horrible inheritance: a roommate he doesn’t know, friends he never asked for, and a gruesome phantom with bleeding wrists that mutters of revenge.

As Andrew searches for the truth of Eddie’s death, he uncovers the lies and secrets left behind by the person he trusted most, discovering a family history soaked in blood and death. Whirling between the backstabbing academic world where Eddie spent his days and the circle of hot boys, fast cars, and hard drugs that ruled Eddie’s nights, the walls Andrew has built against the world begin to crumble, letting in the phantom that hungers for him. 

Cloud Cuckoo Land • Anthony Doerr • Scribner • 28 septembre • 640 pages

Thirteen-year-old Anna, an orphan, lives inside the formidable walls of Constantinople in a house of women who make their living embroidering the robes of priests. Restless, insatiably curious, Anna learns to read, and in this ancient city, famous for its libraries, she finds a book, the story of Aethon, who longs to be turned into a bird so that he can fly to a utopian paradise in the sky. This she reads to her ailing sister as the walls of the only place she has known are bombarded in the great siege of Constantinople. Outside the walls is Omeir, a village boy, miles from home, conscripted with his beloved oxen into the invading army. His path and Anna’s will cross.

Five hundred years later, in a library in Idaho, octogenarian Zeno, who learned Greek as a prisoner of war, rehearses five children in a play adaptation of Aethon’s story, preserved against all odds through centuries. Tucked among the library shelves is a bomb, planted by a troubled, idealistic teenager, Seymour. This is another siege. And in a not-so-distant future, on the interstellar ship Argos, Konstance is alone in a vault, copying on scraps of sacking the story of Aethon, told to her by her father. She has never set foot on our planet.

Top 5 Wednesday • Long series

Le thème du jour propose de parler de nos séries littéraires préférées. Elles doivent contenir plus de trois tomes, pour être considérée comme une série longue.

Peter Grant – Ben Aaronovitch

Probationary Constable Peter Grant dreams of being a detective in London’s Metropolitan Police. Too bad his superior plans to assign him to the Case Progression Unit, where the biggest threat he’ll face is a paper cut. But Peter’s prospects change in the aftermath of a puzzling murder, when he gains exclusive information from an eyewitness who happens to be a ghost. Peter’s ability to speak with the lingering dead brings him to the attention of Detective Chief Inspector Thomas Nightingale, who investigates crimes involving magic and other manifestations of the uncanny. Now, as a wave of brutal and bizarre murders engulfs the city, Peter is plunged into a world where gods and goddesses mingle with mortals and a long-dead evil is making a comeback on a rising tide of magic.

C’est une série que j’aime énormément et qui comprend une dizaine de tomes. J’en ai déjà lu six et je suis en train de la terminer, doucement mais sûrement. J’adore cette histoire qui devient de plus en plus sombre au fur et à mesure et qui contient de nombreuses références à la pop culture anglaise et des touches d’humour anglais divines.

Les Rougon-Macquart – Émile Zola

Dans la petite ville provençale de Plassans, au lendemain du coup d’État d’où va naître le Second Empire, deux adolescents, Miette et Silvère, se mêlent aux insurgés. Leur histoire d’amour comme le soulèvement des républicains traversent le roman, mais au-delà d’eux, c’est aussi la naissance d’une famille qui se trouve évoquée : les Rougon en même temps que les Macquart dont la double lignée, légitime et bâtarde, descend de la grand-mère de Silvère, Tante Dide. Et entre Pierre Rougon et son demi-frère Antoine Macquart, la lutte rapidement va s’ouvrir. Premier roman de la longue série des Rougon-Macquart, La Fortune des Rougon que Zola fait paraître en 1871 est bien le roman des origines. Au moment où s’installe le régime impérial que l’écrivain pourfend, c’est ici que commence la patiente conquête du pouvoir et de l’argent, une lente ascension familiale qui doit faire oublier les commencements sordides, dans la misère et dans le crime.

En une vingtaine de tomes, Émile Zola évoque une famille et ses descendants dans la France du Second Empire. J’en suis quasiment à la moitié et, de manière générale, j’ai aimé chacun des tomes pour des raisons différentes.

Soleil Noir – Éric Giacometti et Jacques Ravenne

Dans une Europe au bord de l’abîme, une organisation nazie, l’Ahnenerbe, pille des lieux sacrés à travers le monde. Ils cherchent à amasser des trésors aux pouvoirs obscurs destinés à établir le règne millénaire du Troisième Reich. Son maître, Himmler, envoie des SS fouiller un sanctuaire tibétain dans une vallée oubliée de l’Himalaya. Il se rend lui-même en Espagne, dans un monastère, pour chercher un tableau énigmatique. De quelle puissance ancienne les nazis croient-ils détenir la clé ? À Londres, Churchill découvre que la guerre contre l’Allemagne sera aussi la guerre spirituelle de la lumière contre l’occulte. Ce livre est le premier tome d’une saga où l’histoire occulte fait se rencontrer les acteurs majeurs de la Seconde Guerre mondiale et des personnages aux destins d’exception : Tristan, le trafiquant d’art au passé trouble, Erika, une archéologue allemande, Laure, l’héritière des Cathares…

Le quatrième tome vient de sortir et j’ai déjà lu les trois premiers. C’est une série prenante autour de reliques, d’archéologie, d’aventures…

Erica Falck – Camilla Läckberg

Erica Falck, trente-cinq ans, auteur de biographies installée dans une petite ville paisible de la côte ouest suédoise, découvre le cadavre aux poignets tailladés d’une amie d’enfance, Alexandra Wijkner, nue dans une baignoire d’eau gelée. Impliquée malgré elle dans l’enquête (à moins qu’une certaine tendance naturelle à fouiller la vie des autres ne soit ici à l’œuvre), Erica se convainc très vite qu’il ne s’agit pas d’un suicide. Sur ce point – et sur beaucoup d’autres -, l’inspecteur Patrik Hedström, amoureux transi, la rejoint.

À la conquête de la vérité, stimulée par un amour naissant, Erica, enquêtrice au foyer façon Desperate Housewives, plonge clans les strates d’une petite société provinciale qu’elle croyait bien connaître et découvre ses secrets, d’autant plus sombres que sera bientôt trouvé le corps d’un peintre clochard – autre mise en scène de suicide.

J’ai le troisième et quatrième tomes dans ma pile à lire et il m’en reste encore une dizaine avant de terminer la série. J’ai beaucoup aimé les deux premiers et j’ai véritablement envie de la continuer.

Bernie Gunther – Philip Kerr

Publiés pour la première fois dans les années 1989-1991, L’été de cristal, La pâle figure et Un requiem allemand évoquent l’ambiance du Ille Reich en 1936 et 1938, et ses décombres en 1947 Ils ont pour héros Bernie Gunther, ex-commissaire de la police berlinoise devenu détective privé. Désabusé et courageux, perspicace et insolent, Bernie est à l’Allemagne nazie ce que Phil Marlowe était à la Californie de la fin des années 30 : un homme solitaire témoin de la cupidité et de la cruauté humaines, qui nous tend le miroir d’un lieu et d’une époque. Des rues de Berlin  » nettoyées  » pour offrir une image idyllique aux visiteurs des Jeux olympiques, à celles de Vienne la corrompue, théâtre après la guerre d’un ballet de tractations pour le moins démoralisant, Bernie va enquêter au milieu d’actrices et de prostituées, de psychiatres et de banquiers, de producteurs de cinéma et de publicitaires. Mais là où la Trilogie se démarque d’un film noir hollywoodien, c’est que les rôles principaux y sont tenus par des vedettes en chair et en os : Heydrich, Himmler et Goering…

Une de mes séries préférées. Plus d’une dizaine de tomes, un personnage attachant et une série allant des années 20 jusqu’aux années 60. Chaque livre est très largement documenté. Il me manque le dernier tome à découvrir.

Mandy Robotham • The Berlin Girl (2020)

The Berlin Girl • Mandy Robotham • 2020 • Avon • 400 pages

Berlin, 1938. It’s the height of summer, and Germany is on the brink of war. When fledgling reporter Georgie Young is posted to Berlin, alongside fellow Londoner Max Spender, she knows they are entering the eye of the storm.

Arriving to a city swathed in red flags and crawling with Nazis, Georgie feels helpless, witnessing innocent people being torn from their homes. As tensions rise, she realises she and Max have to act – even if it means putting their lives on the line.

But when she digs deeper, Georgie begins to uncover the unspeakable truth about Hitler’s Germany – and the pair are pulled into a world darker than she could ever have imagined…


The Berlin Girl est la dernière publication de Mandy Robotham. L’année dernière, j’avais beaucoup aimé The Secret Messenger, car, pour une fois, l’intrigue se déroule en Italie durant la Seconde Guerre mondiale. Ce nouveau roman est dans cette même lignée.

Le contexte historique est original également, et très intéressant. En effet, l’histoire commence quelques mois avant le début du conflit, en septembre 1939, et à Berlin. Le lecteur est au coeur de l’Histoire. Je ne me souviens pas d’avoir lu un roman se déroulant à ce moment précis, ce qui me fait dire qu’il s’agit d’un aspect plutôt original. Se rajoute une autre originalité qui tient au point de vue adopté. Mandy Robotham ne donne pas la parole à une résistante ou à un policier, mais à des journalistes anglais. Ce ne sont pas forcément le type de personnes que j’ai l’habitude de retrouver dans des romans autour de la Seconde Guerre mondiale et le sujet est parfaitement maîtrisé. Il m’a quelque peu fait penser au « roman documentaire » d’Erik Larson, Dans le jardin de la bête. Ce dernier évoque plus la diplomatie, à travers la famille de l’ambassadeur américain de l’époque, mais aussi leur relation avec la presse.

Je dois, toutefois, formuler le même reproche que pour The Secret Messenger. Il y a parfois des petits passages à vide vers le milieu de l’intrigue. Le rythme ralentit entre la mise en place des principaux éléments (les personnages et leurs relations, l’ambiance, le coeur de l’enquête) et le moment où le point central de l’histoire commence réellement. Mandy Robotham est une auteur qui aime prendre son temps pour construire le contexte et l’ambiance, les personnages, leurs caractères… Il est vrai que de ce point de vue, il n’y a rien à redire. J’ai l’impression de voir le Berlin à la veille de la Seconde Guerre mondiale prendre vie sous mes yeux. La fin donne l’impression d’être un peu précipité. Heureusement que les extraits de journaux adoucissent un peu la précipitation des événements. Cependant, je garde tout de même un très bon souvenir de ce livre. Les personnages sont terriblement attachants et on tremble avec eux.

George est typiquement le genre de personnages féminins dont j’apprécie de suivre les aventures. Elle a une certaine éthique, elle recherche la vérité et souhaite toujours la voir éclater au grand jour. Je comprends sa frustration que le monde ne semble pas se rendre compte du danger que les nazis représentent alors qu’elle en est le témoin privilégié. Elle fait preuve de beaucoup d’empathie. Elle sait se montrer forte et courageuse quand il le faut. Pour autant, elle montre aussi ses faiblesses et ses doutes. Elle n’est pas sans peur et sans reproche. Elle illustre parfaitement l’adage, « Si ce n’est pas moi, alors qui ?« . Tout comme Stella, dans The Secret Messenger, ce sont des personnages plutôt nuancés. Quant à son homologue masculin, Max, j’ai mis un peu plus de temps à l’apprécier, mais je me suis réellement attachée à lui au fur et à mesure.

Il y a toute une galerie de personnages secondaires tous plus terriblement attachants les uns que les autres, que ce soient les autres journalistes et reporters étrangers ou la famille de Ruben. Ils permettent d’évoquer d’autres thématiques comme l’absence de liberté d’expression, même pour la presse étrangère basée à Berlin qui doit s’aligner sur les communiqués officiels du Parti, au risque d’être expulsé. Il y a aussi ce que les familles juives doivent subir, la législation antisémite, le transport des enfants en Angleterre et l’espoir pour les parents de les rejoindre le plus vite possible. The Berlin Girl évoque une variété de sujets, mais je n’en dirai pas plus pour celui concernant le coeur de l’enquête de George et Max.

Deuxième roman de Mandy Robotham que je lis et, encore une fois, je ne suis pas passée très loin du coup de coeur. C’est toujours un plaisir de retrouver sa plume. J’ai encore A woman of war à découvrir et qui est présent dans ma bibliothèque. En septembre, elle devrait sortir un autre roman, The Girl behind the Wall. Cette fois-ci, il se déroule durant la Guerre froide, mais toujours à Berlin. Je pense que je serai au rendez-vous pour celui-ci également.

Top 5 Wednesday • Recent purchases

Thème : Recent purchases

Voilà un autre thème qui m’inspire pour ce mois-ci. La question posée est quels sont les cinq livres que j’ai récemment acheté et que je suis excitée à l’idée de lire ou que j’ai aimé. Ça tombe bien, car j’ai refait mon stock le mois dernier en allant dans mes librairies strasbourgeoises préférées et en passant dans plusieurs Emmaüs. Certains ont déjà été lus, mais j’ai surtout envie de parler de ceux qui ne le sont pas encore, mais qui me tentent énormément.

La famille Karnovski – Israel Joshua Singer

La famille Karnovski retrace le destin de trois générations d’une famille juive qui décide de quitter la Pologne pour s’installer en Allemagne à l’aube de la Seconde Guerre mondiale. Comment Jegor, fils d’un père juif et d’une mère aryenne, trouvera-t-il sa place dans un monde où la montée du nazisme est imminente?

Publié en 1943 alors que les nazis massacrent les communautés juives en Europe, le roman d’Israël Joshua Singer est hanté par ces tragiques circonstances et par la volonté de démêler le destin complexe de son peuple.

En 2021, j’avais très envie de découvrir la littérature israélienne que je ne connais absolument pas. J’ouvre le bal avec cette saga familiale, adorant ce genre de récits en temps normal. Il me tarde de le lire et il ne restera pas très longtemps dans ma PAL.

Sistersong – Lucy Holland

535 AD. In the ancient kingdom of Dumnonia, King Cador’s children inherit a fragmented land abandoned by the Romans.

Riva, scarred in a terrible fire, fears she will never heal.
Keyne battles to be seen as the king’s son, when born a daughter.
And Sinne, the spoiled youngest girl, yearns for romance.

All three fear a life of confinement within the walls of the hold – a last bastion of strength against the invading Saxons. But change comes on the day ash falls from the sky, bringing Myrddhin, meddler and magician, and Tristan, a warrior whose secrets will tear the siblings apart. Riva, Keyne and Sinne must take fate into their own hands, or risk being tangled in a story they could never have imagined; one of treachery, love and ultimately, murder. It’s a story that will shape the destiny of Britain.

Je l’avais déjà remarqué et il était présent dans un de mes articles sur les sorties VO. Cette histoire m’intrigue énormément et je suis totalement fan de cette couverture, de cette Bretagne magique et mythique. Je triche un peu, mais je suis déjà plongée dedans et j’en ai lu la moitié. Intriguant et, pour le moment, j’aime beaucoup.

Sumerki – Dmitry Glukhovsky

Quand Dmitry Alexeïevitch, traducteur désargenté, insiste auprès de son agence pour obtenir un nouveau contrat, il ne se doute pas que sa vie en sera bouleversée. Le traducteur en charge du premier chapitre ne donnant plus de nouvelles, c’est un étrange texte qui lui échoit : le récit d’une expédition dans les forêts inexplorées du Yucatán au XVIe siècle, armée par le prêtre franciscain Diego de Landa. Et les chapitres lui en sont remis au compte-gouttes par un mystérieux commanditaire. 

Aussi, quand l’employé de l’agence est sauvagement assassiné et que les périls relatés dans le document s’immiscent dans son quotidien, Dmitry Alexeïevitch prend peur. Dans les ombres du passé, les dieux et les démons mayas se sont-ils acharnés à protéger un savoir interdit ? A moins, bien entendu, que le manuscrit espagnol ne lui ait fait perdre la raison. Alors que le monde autour de lui est ravagé par des ouragans, des séismes et des tsunamis, le temps est compté pour découvrir la vérité.

Un auteur qui m’a largement été recommandé, surtout pour sa série Métro. Cependant, n’ayant pas envie de me lancer dans une nouvelle série alors que j’essaie d’en terminer un maximum, j’ai préféré choisir ce titre qui semble plus être un thriller ésotérique, ma marotte du moment.

Richard Oppenheimer, La vengeance des cendres – Harald Gilbers

Berlin, hiver 1946, le plus froid que la capitale ait connu au XXe siècle. La guerre est certes finie mais l’Allemagne commence à peine à panser ses plaies, et les Berlinois manquent de tout, surtout de nourriture. Dans cette atmosphère très tendue, des corps mutilés font mystérieusement surface aux quatre coins de la ville. Chacun a la peau couverte de mots écrits à l’encre, et une liste de noms inconnus fourrée dans la bouche. Le commissaire Oppenheimer est alors mobilisé pour mener l’enquête et découvre vite un point commun entre ces morts : ils avaient tous collaboré avec le régime nazi. À Oppenheimer de parvenir à retracer le passé du tueur, et à anticiper ses prochains meurtres.

Déjà le quatrième tome de cette série que j’aime beaucoup. Il me tardait de connaître la suite des aventures de Richard Oppenheimer. Le cinquième est sorti récemment en grand format.

La Sorcière – Jules Michelet

Michelet sait prêter sa voix aux parias du passé, à ceux qui n’ont pas eu d’histoire. À travers les siècles la femme tient-elle donc toujours le même rôle, celui de la mal aimée ? En embrassant d’un seul regard toute l’étendue du Moyen Âge, de la Renaissance et du Grand Siècle, Michelet discerne pour la première fois la suite rigoureuse d’une tragédie dont l’héroïne serait une femme à la fois révérée et persécutée : la sorcière.

La figure de la sorcière me fascine. J’avais adoré l’essai de Mona Chollet, Sorcières ! La puissance invaincue des femmes, que je recommande chaudement. J’avais très envie de découvrir celui de Michelet, qui date certes un peu, car il est publié pour la première fois en 1862, mais qui a fait autorité pendant longtemps. La recherche a depuis évolué sur le sujet.

Luke McCallin • Gregor Reinhard, L’Homme de Berlin (2013) ; La maison pâle (2014) et Les cendres de Berlin (2016)

Série Gregor Reinhard, L’homme de Berlin (2013) ; La maison pâle (2014) et Les cendres de Berlin (2016) • Folio Policier et Éditions Toucan

Sarajevo, 1943. Dans cette ville sous occupation de la Wehrmacht et des SS, une journaliste bosniaque est retrouvée sauvagement assassinée dans son appartement. Ainsi que l’homme qui l’accompagnait, un officier des services de renseignements allemand. L’affaire, sensible, est confiée à Gregor Reinhardt, jadis l’un des meilleurs détectives de la Kripo, la section criminelle de Berlin. Cet homme désabusé, hanté par une double tragédie familiale, devra se montrer à la hauteur de sa réputation. Et tenter de trouver la place qu’il reste à la responsabilité individuelle au cœur d’un système de crime de masse. 


Je recherchais une série proche de celle de Philip Kerr quand je suis tombée sur celle-ci. Il y avait quelques similarités, notamment du point de vue du personnage principal. Gregor Reinhard, tout comme Bernie Gunther, est un ancien commissaire de la police criminelle de Berlin, passé sous les drapeaux par obligation plus que par choix et conviction. Les points communs s’arrêtent là. La série a déjà trois tomes publiés en français et il en existe deux autres en anglais : Where God does not walk sur la jeunesse du personnage principal, notamment durant la Première Guerre mondiale et From a dark horizon. Ils ne sont pas encore sortis, mais elles sont prévues pour la fin de l’année.

À vrai dire, le seul reproche que je peux formuler à l’encontre ces trois premiers tomes est que l’intrigue manque parfois de rythme. C’est peut-être un peu moins vrai pour le dernier, Les cendres de Berlin, où il y a moins de passages à vide que dans les deux premiers livres, mais il y en a encore quelques-uns. Il peut ne rien se passer pendant quelques chapitres où l’enquête semble faire du surplace pour ensuite s’accélérer, retomber un peu et remettre un petit coup de fouet avant la fin. C’est très inégal et c’est dommage, car mon attention en pâtissait.

Cependant, la série m’a tout de même plu par d’autres aspects, le premier étant le contexte historique et géographique. En effet, bien souvent, les auteurs s’intéressent énormément au Royaume-Uni, à la France et, depuis quelque temps, à l’Italie durant la Seconde Guerre mondiale. Depuis un an ou deux, de nombreux romans historiques sur cette période se déroulent dans ce pays. Luke McCallin a été en poste dans les Balkans et c’est là-bas qu’il a décidé de planter son décor. Par rapport à ce que j’ai l’habitude de lire autour de cette période historique, c’est original. En tant que lectrice, j’ai vraiment ressenti que l’auteur a une réelle connaissance de Sarajevo, de son environnement et de son histoire. Ce sont des romans très bien documentés. Néanmoins, j’ai été perdue de temps à autre dans ses explications, car il est très pointu. C’est aussi intéressant et j’ai appris énormément avec les deux premiers tomes, et l’ambiance de dangers, tensions est très bien transcrite.

Le troisième tome se déroule à Berlin, peu de temps après la fin de la guerre. Changement de décor et je n’ai pas été trop perdue, car des enquêtes se déroulant dans les décombres de la capitale allemande, c’est assez récurrent et donc, un peu moins original. En effet, un des ouvrages de Philip Kerr prend place également à ce moment, et chez Harald Gilbers également. Les cendres de Berlin est tout de même le tome que j’ai préféré, tout simplement parce que l’histoire a moins de coup de mou. J’ai eu moins de passage un peu ennuyeux durant cette lecture, même si l’enquête est un peu plus classique que dans les deux premiers livres.

Par ailleurs, le personnage principal, Gregor Reinhard, est intéressant, avec autant de défauts que de qualités. Il montre des faiblesses, fait preuve de doutes. L’intrigue autour de son fils le rend sympathique. Il possède un grand sens moral, toujours à la recherche de la vérité. C’est également un point que j’ai apprécié et ce pour les trois tomes : ils ont souvent une fin douce-amère dans la mesure où les auteurs des crimes ne comparaissent que rarement devant la justice. Mais cela colle parfaitement à cette période historique troublée.

Aucun des trois livres n’est un réel coup de coeur, mais clairement, Luke McCallin signe ici une série policière et historique de grande qualité et largement documentée. Je serai au rendez-vous pour les prochains tomes.

Top 5 Wednesday #2 • Backlist Book

Thème : Backlist Book

Le premier thème du mois de juin concerne les livres qui ont été publiés il y a un ou plus, mais qui n’ont pas encore été lu et/ou achetés. Voici mes cinq livres prioritaires en ce moment.

Les thèmes du mois peuvent être trouvés ici.


1. The Poppy & the Rose – Ashlee Cowles

1912: Ava Knight, a teen heiress, boards the Titanic to escape the shadow of her unstable mother and to fulfill her dream of becoming a photographer in New York. During the journey she meets three people who will change her life: a handsome sailor, a soldier in the secret Black Hand society that will trigger World War I, and a woman with clairvoyant abilities. When disaster strikes the ship, family betrayals come to light.

2010: When Taylor Romano arrives in Oxford for a summer journalism program, something feels off. Not only is she greeted by a young, Rolls Royce-driving chauffeur, but he invites her to tea with Lady Mae Knight of Meadowbrook Manor, an old house with a cursed history going back to the days of Henry VIII. Lady Knight seems to know a strange amount about Taylor and her family problems, but before Taylor can learn more, the elderly woman dies, leaving as the only clue an old diary. With the help of the diary, a brooding chauffeur, and some historical sleuthing, Taylor must uncover the link between Ava’s past and her own….

Je suis une grande lectrice de romans historiques. Celui-ci me tente énormément, car il est plutôt rare que je lise autour du Titanic, pourtant un événement qui m’intéresse.

2. Mercy House – Alena Dillon

In the Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood of Brooklyn stands a century-old row house presided over by renegade, silver-haired Sister Evelyn. Gruff and indomitable on the surface, warm and wry underneath, Evelyn and her fellow sisters makes Mercy House a safe haven for the abused and abandoned.

Women like Lucia, who arrives in the dead of night; Mei-Li, the Chinese and Russian house veteran; Desiree, a loud and proud prostitute; Esther, a Haitian immigrant and aspiring collegiate; and Katrina, knitter of lumpy scarves… all of them know what it’s like to be broken by men.

Little daunts Evelyn, until she receives word that Bishop Robert Hawkins is coming to investigate Mercy House and the nuns, whose secret efforts to help the women in ways forbidden by the Church may be uncovered. But Evelyn has secrets too, dark enough to threaten everything she has built.

Evelyn will do anything to protect Mercy House and the vibrant, diverse women it serves—confront gang members, challenge her beliefs, even face her past. As she fights to defend all that she loves, she discovers the extraordinary power of mercy and the grace it grants, not just to those who receive it, but to those strong enough to bestow it.

J’aime les histoires où la maison, demeure… prend une place importante. À cela s’ajoute le destin de femmes hors du commun et que tout semble opposé pour sauver leur refuge. Je suis impatiente de pouvoir le découvrir.

3. Daughter of the Reich – Louise Fein

As the dutiful daughter of a high-ranking Nazi officer, Hetty Heinrich is keen to play her part in the glorious new Thousand Year Reich. But she never imagines that all she believes and knows about her world will come into stark conflict when she encounters Walter, a Jewish friend from the past, who stirs dangerous feelings in her. Confused and conflicted, Hetty doesn’t know whom she can trust and where she can turn to, especially when she discovers that someone has been watching her.

Realizing she is taking a huge risk—but unable to resist the intense attraction she has for Walter—she embarks on a secret love affair with him. Together, they dream about when the war will be over and plan for their future. But as the rising tide of anti-Semitism threatens to engulf them, Hetty and Walter will be forced to take extreme measures.

Il doit sortir prochainement en français. Le résumé m’a tout de suite plu, car il me rappelle les Mandy Robotham que j’aime beaucoup. Je l’avais déjà mis en avant dans un article sur les sorties en anglais qui me tentent énormément, il y a un an. Depuis, il traîne dans ma wish-list et il n’a toujours pas été acheté et lu. Sûrement un de mes prochains achats avec le prochain.

4. The Ratline – Philippe Sands

As Governor of Galicia, SS Brigadeführer Otto Freiherr von Wächter presided over an authority on whose territory hundreds of thousands of Jews and Poles were killed, including the family of the author’s grandfather. By the time the war ended in May 1945, he was indicted for ‘mass murder’. Hunted by the Soviets, the Americans, the Poles and the British, as well as groups of Jews, Wächter went on the run. He spent three years hiding in the Austrian Alps, assisted by his wife Charlotte, before making his way to Rome where he was helped by a Vatican bishop. He remained there for three months. While preparing to travel to Argentina on the ‘ratline’ he died unexpectedly, in July 1949, a few days after spending a weekend with an ‘old comrade’.

In The Ratline Philippe Sands offers a unique account of the daily life of a senior Nazi and fugitive, and of his wife. Drawing on a remarkable archive of family letters and diaries, he unveils a fascinating insight into life before and during the war, on the run, in Rome, and into the Cold War. Eventually the door is unlocked to a mystery that haunts Wächter’s youngest son, who continues to believe his father was a good man – what happened to Otto Wächter, and how did he die?

J’ai beaucoup aimé son premier essai, East West Street, sur le dévéloppement des notions de génocide, crimes contre l’humanité. Il retourne sur ce terrain fertile de la Seconde Guerre mondiale en parlant du réseau de fuite nazi. Je connais cet aspect du conflit, mais sans être réellement rentrée dans les détails. Cela fait un an qu’il est sorti et je ne l’ai toujours pas acheté, mais prochainement.

5. Hamnet – Maggie O’Farrell

Warwickshire in the 1580s. Agnes is a woman as feared as she is sought after for her unusual gifts. She settles with her husband in Henley street, Stratford, and has three children: a daughter, Susanna, and then twins, Hamnet and Judith. The boy, Hamnet, dies in 1596, aged eleven. Four years or so later, the husband writes a play called Hamlet.

Ce livre a beaucoup fait parler de lui et il m’intéresse énormément, car il parle de Shakespeare. Ce dernier a toujours été un de mes auteurs préférés. Il est sorti l’année dernière et il a été traduit récemment en français, aux éditions Belfond.

Top 5 Wednesday #2 • Family Dynamics

Le thème de cette semaine m’inspire énormément. Le 15 mai a eu lieu la journée mondiale de la famille, d’où ce sujet pour ce mercredi. Il est pris dans un sens très large, car il est autant question des liens du sang que de la famille que l’on se crée. J’ai essayé, dans la mesure du possible, de piocher dans mes récentes lectures. La semaine dernière, sur le thème des « lieux communs », j’écrivais que j’aimais beaucoup les sagas familiales… Cet article est un peu la continuité de ce dernier.

Thème : Family dynamics

Among the leaving and the dead d’Inara Verzemnieks

Inara Verzemnieks was raised by her Latvian grandparents in Washington State, among expatriates who scattered smuggled Latvian sand over coffins, the children singing folk songs about a land none of them had visited. Her grandmother Livija’s stories vividly recreated the home she fled during the Second World War, when she was separated from her sister, Ausma, whom she wouldn’t see again for more than fifty years.

Journeying back to their remote village, Inara comes to know Ausma and her trauma as an exile to Siberia under Stalin, while reconstructing Livija’s survival through her years as a refugee. In uniting their stories, Inara honors both sisters in a haunting and luminous account of loss, survival, resilience, and love.

Cet ouvrage est un plus un essai autour de la famille, l’importance de cette dernière dans la construction d’un individu et de son histoire. L’auteur écrit à propos de sa grand-mère et de la soeur de cette dernière, de sa volonté de comprendre ses racines, leurs histoires. Il est dommage que parfois l’écriture poétique et lyrique de l’auteur prend trop le pas sur le sujet abordé, apportant des longueurs.

L’Assommoir d’Émile Zola

Qu’est-ce qui nous fascine dans la vie « simple et tranquille » de Gervaise Macquart ? Pourquoi le destin de cette petite blanchisseuse montée de Provence à Paris nous touche-t-il tant aujourd’hui encore? Que nous disent les exclus du quartier de la Goutte-d’Or version Second Empire? L’existence douloureuse de Gervaise est avant tout une passion où s’expriment une intense volonté de vivre, une générosité sans faille, un sens aigu de l’intimité comme de la fête. Et tant pis si, la fatalité aidant, divers « assommoirs » – un accident de travail, l’alcool, les « autres », la faim – ont finalement raison d’elle et des siens. Gervaise aura parcouru une glorieuse trajectoire dans sa déchéance même. Relisons L’Assommoir, cette « passion de Gervaise », cet étonnant chef-d’oeuvre, avec des yeux neufs.

Comment ne pas parler de dynamiques familiales sans évoquer Zola ? Sa série Les Rougon-Macquart rentre pleinement dans cette catégorique. Elle est en l’exemple même, car Zola étudie à travers une famille les prédispositions à l’alcoolisme, par exemple, ou à la folie… J’en suis au septième tome, L’Assommoir et jusqu’à présent, rares sont les tomes qui m’ont déçue.

After Alice fell de Kim Taylor Blackemore

New Hampshire, 1865. Marion Abbott is summoned to Brawders House asylum to collect the body of her sister, Alice. She’d been found dead after falling four stories from a steep-pitched roof. Officially: an accident. Confidentially: suicide. But Marion believes a third option: murder.

Returning to her family home to stay with her brother and his second wife, the recently widowed Marion is expected to quiet her feelings of guilt and grief—to let go of the dead and embrace the living. But that’s not easy in this house full of haunting memories.

Just when the search for the truth seems hopeless, a stranger approaches Marion with chilling words: I saw her fall.

Now Marion is more determined than ever to find out what happened that night at Brawders, and why. With no one she can trust, Marion may risk her own life to uncover the secrets buried with Alice in the family plot.

Sorti cette année, ce roman serait presque un huis clos au sein d’une famille. En effet, la mort de la plus jeune soeur, Alice, rend les relations tendues entre Marion et son frère et sa belle-soeur. Il n’y a pas que la mort de la plus jeune des soeurs qui empoisonne l’atmosphère, mais bien d’autres sombres secrets. C’est un roman que j’ai beaucoup aimé.

Quand Hitler s’empara du lapin rose de Judith Kerr

Imaginez que le climat se détériore dans votre pays, au point que certains citoyens soient menacés dans leur existence. Imaginez surtout que votre père se trouve être l’un de ces citoyens et qu’il soit obligé d’abandonner tout et de partir sur-le-champ, pour éviter la prison et même la mort. C’est l’histoire d’Anna dans l’Allemagne nazie d’Adolf Hitler. Elle a neuf ans et ne s’occupe guère que de crayons de couleur, de visites au zoo avec son « oncle » Julius et de glissades dans la neige. Brutalement les choses changent. Son père disparaît sans prévenir. Puis, elle-même et le reste de sa famille s’expatrient pour le rejoindre à l’étranger. Départ de Berlin qui ressemble à une fuite. Alors commence la vie dure – mais non sans surprises – de réfugiés. D’abord la Suisse, près de Zurich. Puis Paris. Enfin Londres. Odyssée pleine de fatigues et d’angoisses mais aussi de pittoresque et d’imprévu – et toujours drôles – d’Anna et de son frère Max affrontant l’inconnu et contraints de vaincre toutes sortes de difficultés – dont la première et non la moindre: celle des langues étrangères! Ce récit autobiographique de Judith Kerr nous enchante par l’humour qui s’en dégage, et nous touche par cette particulière vibration de ton propre aux souvenirs de famille, quand il apparaît que la famille fut une de celles où l’on s’aime…

J’ai déjà eu l’occasion d’évoquer ce roman et son adaptation cinématographique sur le blog. [lien] C’est une très belle histoire d’une famille qui reste unie malgré les épreuves et qui fait preuve d’une grande résilience. Il y a un beau message dans ce roman, où la famille, le fait de rester ensemble malgré les difficultés sont les choses les plus importantes.

Guerre & Paix de Léon Tolstoï

1805 à Moscou, en ces temps de paix fragile, les Bolkonsky, les Rostov et les Bézoukhov constituent les personnages principaux d’une chronique familiale. Une fresque sociale où l’aristocratie, de Moscou à Saint-Pétersbourg, entre grandeur et misérabilisme, se prend au jeu de l’ambition sociale, des mesquineries, des premiers émois.

1812, la guerre éclate et peu à peu les personnages imaginaires évoluent au sein même des événements historiques. Le conte social, dépassant les ressorts de l’intrigue psychologique, prend une dimension d’épopée historique et se change en récit d’une époque. La “Guerre” selon Tolstoï, c’est celle menée contre Napoléon par l’armée d’Alexandre, c’est la bataille d’Austerlitz, l’invasion de la Russie, l’incendie de Moscou, puis la retraite des armées napoléoniennes.

Entre les deux romans de sa fresque, le portrait d’une classe sociale et le récit historique, Tolstoï tend une passerelle, livrant une réflexion philosophique sur le décalage de la volonté humaine aliénée à l’inéluctable marche de l’Histoire ou lorsque le destin façonne les hommes malgré eux.

Un autre auteur spécialisé dans les chroniques familiales, Léon Tolstoï. Dans ce récit, il s’intéresse à plusieurs familles de l’aristocratie russe. Il montre les relations au sein d’une même famille et celles qu’elles entretiennent entre elles. C’est une très bonne lecture que je recommande. Mon avis est disponible sur le blog. [lien]

Top 5 Wednesday #1 • Favorite Tropes

J’inaugure un nouveau rendez-vous sur le blog avec le Top 5 Wednesday. Je ne pense pas forcément participer toutes les semaines, mais si le thème me plait et me parle, c’est avec plaisir que j’y réagirai. Les sujets sont annoncés chaque mois sur le groupe Goodreads.

Thème : Favorite Tropes

Avant de me lancer dans cet article, j’ai fait quelques recherches sur ce terme de tropes et sur ce qu’il pouvait signifiait en français. Le meilleur terme que j’ai trouvé est celui de lieux communs. À titre d’exemples, dans les romances, ce seraient les fausses relations amoureuses ou tout ce qui touche à la royauté, les mariages de convenance… Pour le fantastique, ce sont les thématiques d’un•e Élu•e, sauver le monde… Pour mes cinq « lieux communs » préférés, j’ai essayé de tirer un exemple parmi mes plus récentes lectures, ou, du moins, depuis le début d’année.

1. La quête

L’exemple le plus parlant est sans conteste la quête du Graal. Je pense aussi au Seigneur des Anneaux de J.R.R. Tolkien. C’est un lieu commun que j’apprécie beaucoup. Dans mon esprit, il y a toujours le côté partir à l’aventure, aller vers l’inconnu, sortir de sa zone de confort… Le personnage principal va tirer des connaissances, des expériences de son voyage.

Un des derniers livres que j’ai pu lire et qui représente parfaitement cette idée de quête est le troisième tome de la série La Passe-Miroir, La mémoire de Babel. De manière général, la série raconte la quête d’Ophélie et Thorn pour découvrir l’identité de Dieu et l’arrêter.

Thorn a disparu depuis deux ans et demi et Ophélie désespère. Les indices trouvés dans le livre de Farouk et les informations livrées par Dieu mènent toutes à l’arche de Babel, dépositaire des archives mémorielles du monde. Ophélie décide de s’y rendre sous une fausse identité.

2. Une relique ou un artefact puissant•e

S’il est doublé d’une quête, c’est encore mieux ! Je pense que mon amour pour ce genre de lieux communs vient d’Indiana Jones, qui est présenté comme un chasseur de reliques et de trésor (même si, en réalité, il est plus un pilleur de tombes). Certaines d’entre elles ont des propriétés magiques. En littérature, il y a, à nouveau, la quête du Graal, ou les thrillers ésotériques, genres dont je raffole.

Et c’est justement un thriller ésotérique que je vais prendre en exemple avec une des mes toutes dernières lectures. Elle date du début du mois. Il s’agit du troisième tome de la dernière série d’Éric Giacometti et Jacques Ravenne, Soleil noir, La relique du chaos. Les reliques (très particulières pour le coup) ont un caractère mystique et magique.

Juillet 1942. Jamais l’issue du conflit n’a semblé aussi incertaine. Si l’Angleterre a écarté tout risque d’invasion, la Russie de Staline plie sous les coups de boutoir des armées d’Hitler. L’Europe est sur le point de basculer. À travers la quête des Swastikas, la guerre occulte se déchaîne pour tenter de faire pencher la balance. Celui qui s’emparera de l’objet sacré remportera la victoire. Tristan Marcas, agent double au passé obscur, part à la recherche du trésor des Romanov, qui cache, selon le dernier des tsars, l’ultime relique. À Berlin, Moscou et Londres, la course contre la montre est lancée, entraînant dans une spirale vertigineuse Erika, l’archéologue allemande et Laure, la jeune résistante française…

3. Un amour impossible

La faute à Roméo et Juliette de Shakespeare, qui est une de mes pièces préférées au monde. Je prend ce thème ou lieux commun dans un sens très large, car des raisons pour lesquelles un amour peut être impossible sont variées.

Un des derniers livres que j’ai lu et qui peut illustrer ce sujet est Follow me to ground de Sue Rainsford. Il s’agit d’une histoire d’amour entre une sorcière et un mortel qui est vu d’un mauvais oeil par les familles des deux protagonistes.

LIEN VERS L’ARTICLE

Ada and her father, touched by the power to heal illness, live on the edge of a village where they help sick locals—or “Cures”—by cracking open their damaged bodies or temporarily burying them in the reviving, dangerous Ground nearby. Ada, a being both more and less than human, is mostly uninterested in the Cures, until she meets a man named Samson. When they strike up an affair, to the displeasure of her father and Samson’s widowed, pregnant sister, Ada is torn between her old way of life and new possibilities with her lover—and eventually comes to a decision that will forever change Samson, the town, and the Ground itself.

4. Un conflit avec un dieu

C’est un lieu commun qui, pour le coup, brasse très large. Il me rappelle à la fois les récits bibliques, la mythologie grecque… Je pense aussi à des livres fantastiques ou de science-fiction, les réécritures autour des mythes et légendes.

Un livre que j’ai très récemment lu (et apprécié) et dans lequel l’intrigue a pour origine un conflit avec un dieu est Lore d’Alexandra Bracken. Le conflit est entre Zeus et les dieux, les anciens et les nouveaux dieux, les dieux avec les chasseurs… L’auteur s’inspire de la mythologie grecque.

Every seven years, the Agon begins. As punishment for a past rebellion, nine Greek gods are forced to walk the earth as mortals, hunted by the descendants of ancient bloodlines, all eager to kill a god and seize their divine power and immortality. Long ago, Lore Perseous fled that brutal world in the wake of her family’s sadistic murder by a rival line, turning her back on the hunt’s promises of eternal glory. For years she’s pushed away any thought of revenge against the man–now a god–responsible for their deaths.

Yet as the next hunt dawns over New York City, two participants seek out her help: Castor, a childhood friend of Lore believed long dead, and a gravely wounded Athena, among the last of the original gods.

The goddess offers an alliance against their mutual enemy and, at last, a way for Lore to leave the Agon behind forever. But Lore’s decision to bind her fate to Athena’s and rejoin the hunt will come at a deadly cost–and still may not be enough to stop the rise of a new god with the power to bring humanity to its knees.

5. Les sagas familiales

Je lis pas mal de sagas familiales, surtout par des auteurs russes. J’aime suivre le destin d’une famille sur une ou plusieurs générations. J’ai tellement d’exemples qui me viennent à l’esprit comme La saga moscovite de Vassily Axionov, Guerre & Paix de Léon Tolstoï (terminé en début d’année).

Cependant, si je dois prendre un exemple dans mes lectures très récentes, ce sont les Rougon-Macquart de Zola qui arrivent en premier. C’est aussi un des grands exemples de sagas familiales et celle-ci compte près de vingt tomes. Au début du mois, j’ai terminé le septième tome, L’Assommoir qui est un coup de coeur.

Qu’est-ce qui nous fascine dans la vie « simple et tranquille » de Gervaise Macquart ? Pourquoi le destin de cette petite blanchisseuse montée de Provence à Paris nous touche-t-il tant aujourd’hui encore ? Que nous disent les exclus du quartier de la Goutte-d’Or version Second Empire ? L’existence douloureuse de Gervaise est avant tout une passion où s’expriment une intense volonté de vivre, une générosité sans faille, un sens aigu de l’intimité comme de la fête. Et tant pis si, la fatalité aidant, divers «assommoirs» – un accident de travail, l’alcool, les «autres», la faim – ont finalement raison d’elle et des siens. Gervaise aura parcouru une glorieuse trajectoire dans sa déchéance même. Relisons L’Assommoir, cette «passion de Gervaise», cet étonnant chef-d’oeuvre, avec des yeux neufs.

Quels sont vos « lieux communs » préférés en littérature ? Quels en sont les meilleurs exemples ?

Judith Kerr • Quand Hitler s’empara du lapin rose (1971)

Quand Hitler s’empara du lapin rose • Judith Kerr • 1971 • Le Livre de Poche • 314 pages

Imaginez que le climat se détériore dans votre pays, au point que certains citoyens soient menacés dans leur existence. Imaginez surtout que votre père se trouve être l’un de ces citoyens et qu’il soit obligé d’abandonner tout et de partir sur-le-champ, pour éviter la prison et même la mort. C’est l’histoire d’Anna dans l’Allemagne nazie d’Adolf Hitler. Elle a neuf ans et ne s’occupe guère que de crayons de couleur, de visites au zoo avec son « oncle » Julius et de glissades dans la neige. Brutalement les choses changent. Son père disparaît sans prévenir. Puis, elle-même et le reste de sa famille s’expatrient pour le rejoindre à l’étranger. Départ de Berlin qui ressemble à une fuite. Alors commence la vie dure – mais non sans surprises – de réfugiés. D’abord la Suisse, près de Zurich. Puis Paris. Enfin Londres. Odyssée pleine de fatigues et d’angoisses mais aussi de pittoresque et d’imprévu – et toujours drôles – d’Anna et de son frère Max affrontant l’inconnu et contraints de vaincre toutes sortes de difficultés – dont la première et non la moindre: celle des langues étrangères! Ce récit autobiographique de Judith Kerr nous enchante par l’humour qui s’en dégage, et nous touche par cette particulière vibration de ton propre aux souvenirs de famille, quand il apparaît que la famille fut une de celles où l’on s’aime…

J’ai ce roman dans ma liste d’envie depuis quelques années. Il a fallu que son adaptation soit disponible à la demande pour que je me décide enfin à l’acheter et à le lire. J’ai passé un très bon moment avec les deux.

Quand Hitler s’empara du lapin rose est un roman autobiographique. Judith Kerr s’est inspirée de sa propre histoire et celle de sa famille. Son frère et elle deviennent Max et Anna. Elle raconte son exil loin d’Allemagne, après les élections de 1933 qui ont vu l’arrivée des nazis au pouvoir. La famille a été contrainte de fuir, car le père, un intellectuel juif, a souvent pris position contre le national-socialisme. C’est une histoire prenante. Dès les premières pages ou minutes du film, j’ai pris à coeur le destin d’Anna. J’avais tout de même l’espoir que les siens puissent rentrer dans leur pays, même si, en tant qu’adulte et connaissant l’Histoire, je savais que c’était impossible. Finalement, la question a été de savoir où ils allaient définitivement s’installer et se reconstruire.

Il y a beaucoup d’émotions retranscrites et, en tant que lectrice, je suis passée par tellement de sentiments différents, en même temps que la famille Kemper : de la tristesse à la colère, de l’espoir au désespoir le plus total… J’ai été impressionnée par la résilience d’Anna et Max alors qu’ils sont si jeunes, ainsi que de leurs parents. Ils avancent, essaient constamment de se reconstruire. Ils tentent tant bien que mal de s’adapter à chaque fois à un nouveau pays, une nouvelle langue et de découvrir des coutumes différentes. C’est un aspect que j’ai énormément apprécié de ce roman. J’avoue que je n’ai pas pu m’empêcher de penser à mes grands-parents maternels, qui, dans un autre contexte, ont fui la guerre civile espagnole, puis la guerre d’Algérie.

C’est un roman que j’avais tout de même peur de ne pas apprécier à sa juste valeur par son côté très jeunesse. Le public visé est celui qui a l’âge d’Anna, c’est-à-dire une dizaine d’années. Le livre est écrit de son point de vue. Cependant, je l’ai vraiment apprécié par tous les aspects que j’ai évoqués auparavant : un récit d’exil, de résilience, de l’importance de la famille avec toutes les épreuves qu’elle doit traverser. Il y a aussi les différents personnages. La famille est attachante et il y a de très jolis passages. Comme le dit si bien Anna, tant qu’ils sont ensemble, tout va pour le mieux.

En 2019, Quand Hitler s’empara du lapin rose a fait l’objet d’une adaptation par un studio allemand avec Oliver Masucci dans le rôle du père. C’est un acteur que j’apprécie énormément. En France, il est notamment connu pour son rôle d’Ulrich dans la série Dark de Netflix. Je ne connaissais pas les autres acteurs. L’actrice qui joue Anna est très bien, mais elle ne crève pas l’écran non plus. Aucun d’eux d’ailleurs. Ils sont bons dans leurs rôles, mais je n’ai pas vu de performances exceptionnelles.

Cependant, cette adaptation est extrêmement fidèle. Je n’ai relevé que deux différences, sans qu’elles apportent de véritables chamboulements dans l’intrigue. Par exemple, par rapport au livre, il y a un personnage secondaire qui manque à l’appel, mais son absence ne m’a pas dérangé. Elle n’apportait pas grand chose à l’intrigue dans le livre. Le deuxième changement est lorsqu’ils sont à Paris. Ils reçoivent l’aide d’un membre de leur famille dans le livre, une tante si mes souvenirs sont bons, alors que dans le film, il s’agit d’un metteur en scène allemand dont le père d’Anna avait souvent fait la critique. En revanche, j’ai énormément aimé la musique qui accompagne parfaitement les émotions présentes.

Que ce soit pour le livre ou son adaptation cinématographique, je n’ai pas eu de gros coup de coeur. Ça se laisse lire ou regarder, mais je n’en garderai pas un souvenir impérissable. Ils s’arrêtent tous les deux alors que la famille arrive à Londres. Le livre a en effet un deuxième tome, Ici Londres. S’il croise ma route un jour, je le lirai avec plaisir, mais ce n’est pas ma priorité.

Sorties VO • Avril 2021

Le mois d’avril est rempli de nouvelles parutions plus prometteuses les unes que les autres avec des réécritures de la mythologie grecque, la publication d’un nouveau roman pour une auteur que j’adore, Christina Henry, des ouvrages autour de la Seconde Guerre mondiale qui ont l’air passionnant (dont une réécriture d’Hamlet qui est une de mes pièces de théâtre préférée)… Laquelle de ces nouvelles sorties VO vous fait le plus envie ?

Eva & Eve: A Search for My Mother’s Lost Childhood and What a War Left Behind • Julie MetzAtria Books • 6 avril • 320 pages

To Julie Metz, her mother, Eve, was the quintessential New Yorker. Eve rarely spoke about her childhood and it was difficult to imagine her living anywhere else except Manhattan, where she could be found attending Carnegie Hall and the Metropolitan Opera or inspecting a round of French triple crème at Zabar’s. 

In truth, Eve had endured a harrowing childhood in Nazi-occupied Vienna. After her mother passed, Julie discovered a keepsake book filled with farewell notes from friends and relatives addressed to a ten-year-old girl named Eva. This long-hidden memento was the first clue to the secret pain that Julie’s mother had carried as a refugee and immigrant, shining a light on a family that had to persevere at every turn to escape the antisemitism and xenophobia that threatened their survival. 

Interweaving personal memoir and family history, Eva and Evevividly traces one woman’s search for her mother’s lost childhood while revealing the resilience of our forebears and the sacrifices that ordinary people are called to make during history’s darkest hours.

Ariadne • Jennifer Saint • Wildfire • 29 avril • 400 pages

As Princesses of Crete and daughters of the fearsome King Minos, Ariadne and her sister Phaedra grow up hearing the hoofbeats and bellows of the Minotaur echo from the Labyrinth beneath the palace. The Minotaur – Minos’s greatest shame and Ariadne’s brother – demands blood every year.

When Theseus, Prince of Athens, arrives in Crete as a sacrifice to the beast, Ariadne falls in love with him. But helping Theseus kill the monster means betraying her family and country, and Ariadne knows only too well that in a world ruled by mercurial gods – drawing their attention can cost you everything.

In a world where women are nothing more than the pawns of powerful men, will Ariadne’s decision to betray Crete for Theseus ensure her happy ending? Or will she find herself sacrificed for her lover’s ambition?

Near the bones • Christina Henry • Berkley Books • 13 avril • 331 pages

Mattie can’t remember a time before she and William lived alone on a mountain together. She must never make him upset. But when Mattie discovers the mutilated body of a fox in the woods, she realizes that they’re not alone after all.

There’s something in the woods that wasn’t there before, something that makes strange cries in the night, something with sharp teeth and claws.

When three strangers appear on the mountaintop looking for the creature in the woods, Mattie knows their presence will anger William. Terrible things happen when William is angry.

Sistersong • Lucy Holland • MacMillan • 15 avril • 400 pages

535 AD. In the ancient kingdom of Dumnonia, King Cador’s children inherit a fragmented land abandoned by the Romans.

Riva, scarred in a terrible fire, fears she will never heal.
Keyne battles to be seen as the king’s son, when born a daughter.
And Sinne, the spoiled youngest girl, yearns for romance.

All three fear a life of confinement within the walls of the hold – a last bastion of strength against the invading Saxons. But change comes on the day ash falls from the sky, bringing Myrddhin, meddler and magician, and Tristan, a warrior whose secrets will tear the siblings apart. Riva, Keyne and Sinne must take fate into their own hands, or risk being tangled in a story they could never have imagined; one of treachery, love and ultimately, murder. It’s a story that will shape the destiny of Britain.

Ophelia • Norman Bacal • Barlow Books • 15 avril • 312 pages

To be or not to be, that is the question Ophelia faces in this Hamlet modernization.

The story opens in Nazi-occupied Denmark: a fisherman and his son risk their lives on dark, stormy seas to transport the family of a Jewish merchant to safety. When the fisherman refuses any reward, the merchant makes a vow that will transcend generations.

Sixty years later the fisherman’s son, Geri Neilson has built an international pharmaceutical company. When Geri dies in mysterious circumstances, his son Tal is convinced that Geri’s business partner, Red King, orchestrated murder as part of a scheme to take control of the company. Geri’s voice in Tal’s head, urges him to fight for the legacy and seek vengeance.

Enter Ophelia, the granddaughter of the merchant Geri and his father saved. She is sworn to protect Tal without his knowledge, in accordance with the vow that has become a secret family obsession.

And she’s been trained to risk her life to do it.

The battles between good and evil, addiction and independence, ambition and love, play out in an international epic. Twists and turns abound in this study of obsession, secrecy, romance, and duty to family.

The Venice sketchbook • Rhys Bowen • Lake Union Publishing • 13 avril • 412 pages

Caroline Grant is struggling to accept the end of her marriage when she receives an unexpected bequest. Her beloved great-aunt Lettie leaves her a sketchbook, three keys, and a final whisper…Venice. Caroline’s quest: to scatter Juliet “Lettie” Browning’s ashes in the city she loved and to unlock the mysteries stored away for more than sixty years.

It’s 1938 when art teacher Juliet Browning arrives in romantic Venice. For her students, it’s a wealth of history, art, and beauty. For Juliet, it’s poignant memories and a chance to reconnect with Leonardo Da Rossi, the man she loves whose future is already determined by his noble family. However star-crossed, nothing can come between them. Until the threat of war closes in on Venice and they’re forced to fight, survive, and protect a secret that will bind them forever.

Key by key, Lettie’s life of impossible love, loss, and courage unfolds. It’s one that Caroline can now make right again as her own journey of self-discovery begins.

Courage, my love ! • Kristin Beck • Berkley Books • 13 avril • 336 pages

Rome, 1943

Lucia Colombo has had her doubts about fascism for years, but as a single mother in an increasingly unstable country, politics are for other people–she needs to focus on keeping herself and her son alive. Then the Italian government falls and the German occupation begins, and suddenly, Lucia finds that complacency is no longer an option. 

Francesca Gallo has always been aware of injustice and suffering. A polio survivor who lost her father when he was arrested for his anti-fascist politics, she came to Rome with her fiancé to start a new life. But when the Germans invade and her fiancé is taken by the Nazis, Francesca decides she has only one option: to fight back.

As Lucia and Francesca are pulled deeper into the struggle against the Nazi occupation, both women learn to resist alongside the partisans to drive the Germans from Rome. But as winter sets in, the occupation tightens its grip on the city, and the resistance is in constant danger. 

The Passenger • Ulrich Alexander Boschwitz • Metropolitan Books • 13 avril (réédition d’un livre de 1939) • 288 pages

Berlin, November 1938. Jewish shops have been ransacked and looted, synagogues destroyed. As storm troopers pound on his door, Otto Silbermann, a respected businessman who fought for Germany in the Great War, is forced to sneak out the back of his own home. Turned away from establishments he had long patronized, and fearful of being exposed as a Jew despite his Aryan looks, he boards a train.

And then another. And another . . . until his flight becomes a frantic odyssey across Germany, as he searches first for information, then for help, and finally for escape. His travels bring him face-to-face with waiters and conductors, officials and fellow outcasts, seductive women and vicious thieves, a few of whom disapprove of the regime while the rest embrace it wholeheartedly.

Clinging to his existence as it was just days before, Silbermann refuses to believe what is happening even as he is beset by opportunists, betrayed by associates, and bereft of family, friends, and fortune. As his world collapses around him, he is forced to concede that his nightmare is all too real.

The Mary Shelley Club • Goldy Moldavsky • Henry Holt & Company • 13 avril • 480 pages

New girl Rachel Chavez is eager to make a fresh start at Manchester Prep. But as one of the few scholarship kids, Rachel struggles to fit in, and when she gets caught up in a prank gone awry, she ends up with more enemies than friends.

To her surprise, however, the prank attracts the attention of the Mary Shelley Club, a secret club of students with one objective: come up with the scariest prank to orchestrate real fear. But as the pranks escalate, the competition turns cutthroat and takes on a life of its own.

When the tables are turned and someone targets the club itself, Rachel must track down the real-life monster in their midst . . . even if it means finally confronting the dark secrets from her past.

The last night in London • Karen White • Berkley Books • 20 avril • 480 pages

London, 1939. Beautiful and ambitious Eva Harlow and her American best friend, Precious Dubose, are trying to make their way as fashion models. When Eva falls in love with Graham St. John, an aristocrat and Royal Air Force pilot, she can’t believe her luck – she’s getting everything she ever wanted. Then the Blitz devastates her world, and Eva finds herself slipping into a web of intrigue, spies and secrets. As Eva struggles to protect everything she holds dear, all it takes is one unwary moment to change their lives forever.

London, 2019. American journalist Maddie Warner travels to London to interview Precious about her life in pre-WWII London. Maddie, healing from past trauma and careful to close herself off to others, finds herself drawn to both Precious and to Colin, Precious’ enigmatic surrogate nephew. As Maddie gets closer to her, she begins to unravel Precious’ haunting past – and the secrets she swore she’d never reveal…

Lost in Paris • Elizabeth Thompson • Gallery Books • 13 avril • 352 pages

Hannah Bond has always been a bookworm, which is why she fled Florida—and her unstable, alcoholic mother—for a quiet life leading Jane Austen-themed tours through the British countryside. But on New Year’s Eve, everything comes crashing down when she arrives back at her London flat to find her mother, Marla, waiting for her.

Marla’s brought two things with her: a black eye from her ex-boyfriend and an envelope. Its contents? The deed to an apartment in Paris, an old key, and newspaper clippings about the death of a famous writer named Andres Armand. Hannah, wary of her mother’s motives, reluctantly agrees to accompany her to Paris, where against all odds, they discover great-grandma Ivy’s apartment frozen in 1940 and covered in dust.

Inside the apartment, Hannah and Marla discover mysterious clues about Ivy’s life—including a diary detailing evenings of drinking and dancing with Hemingway, the Fitzgeralds, and other iconic expats. Outside, they retrace her steps through the city in an attempt to understand why she went to such great lengths to hide her Paris identity from future generations.

The Divide, The last watch • J.S. Dewes • Tor Books • 20 avril • 480 pages

The Divide.

It’s the edge of the universe.

Now it’s collapsing—and taking everyone and everything with it.

The only ones who can stop it are the Sentinels—the recruits, exiles, and court-martialed dregs of the military.

At the Divide, Adequin Rake, commanding the Argus, has no resources, no comms—nothing, except for the soldiers that no one wanted.

They’re humanity’s only chance.

Churchill’s secret messenger • Alan Hlad • John Scognamiglio Book • 27 avril • 304 pages

London, 1941: In a cramped bunker in Winston Churchill’s Cabinet War Rooms, underneath Westminster’s Treasury building, civilian women huddle at desks, typing up confidential documents and reports. Since her parents were killed in a bombing raid, Rose Teasdale has spent more hours than usual in Room 60, working double shifts, growing accustomed to the burnt scent of the Prime Minister’s cigars permeating the stale air. Winning the war is the only thing that matters, and she will gladly do her part. And when Rose’s fluency in French comes to the attention of Churchill himself, it brings a rare yet dangerous opportunity.

Rose is recruited for the Special Operations Executive, a secret British organization that conducts espionage in Nazi-occupied Europe. After weeks of grueling training, Rose parachutes into France with a new codename: Dragonfly. Posing as a cosmetics saleswoman in Paris, she ferries messages to and from the Resistance, knowing that the slightest misstep means capture or death.

Soon Rose is assigned to a new mission with Lazare Aron, a French Resistance fighter who has watched his beloved Paris become a shell of itself, with desolate streets and buildings draped in Swastikas. Since his parents were sent to a German work camp, Lazare has dedicated himself to the cause with the same fervor as Rose. Yet Rose’s very loyalty brings risks as she undertakes a high-stakes prison raid, and discovers how much she may have to sacrifice to justify Churchill’s faith in her…

The End of Men • Christina Sweeney-Baird • Double Day Canada • 27 avril • 416 pages

The year is 2025, and a mysterious virus has broken out in Scotland–a lethal illness that seems to affect only men. When Dr. Amanda MacLean reports this phenomenon, she is dismissed as hysterical. By the time her warning is heeded, it is too late. The virus becomes a global pandemic–and a political one. The victims are all men. The world becomes alien–a women’s world.

What follows is the immersive account of the women who have been left to deal with the virus’s consequences, told through first-person narratives. Dr. MacLean; Catherine, a social historian determined to document the human stories behind the male plague; intelligence analyst Dawn, tasked with helping the government forge a new society; and Elizabeth, one of many scientists desperately working to develop a vaccine. Through these women and others, we see the uncountable ways the absence of men has changed society, from the personal–the loss of husbands and sons–to the political–the changes in the workforce, fertility and the meaning of family.

The last bookshop in London • Madeline Martin • Hanover Square Press • 6 avril • 320 pages

August 1939: London prepares for war as Hitler’s forces sweep across Europe. Grace Bennett has always dreamed of moving to the city, but the bunkers and blackout curtains that she finds on her arrival were not what she expected. And she certainly never imagined she’d wind up working at Primrose Hill, a dusty old bookshop nestled in the heart of London.

Through blackouts and air raids as the Blitz intensifies, Grace discovers the power of storytelling to unite her community in ways she never dreamed—a force that triumphs over even the darkest nights of the war.

The Dictionary of lost words • Pip Williams • Ballantine Books • 6 avril • 400 pages

Esme is born into a world of words. Motherless and irrepressibly curious, she spends her childhood in the « Scriptorium, » a garden shed in Oxford where her father and a team of dedicated lexicographers are collecting words for the very first Oxford English Dictionary. Young Esme’s place is beneath the sorting table, unseen and unheard. One day a slip of paper containing the word « bondmaid » flutters to the floor. She rescues the slip, and when she learns that the word means slave-girl, she withholds it from the OED and begins to collect words that show women in a more positive light.

As she grows up, Esme realizes that words and meanings relating to women’s and common folks’ experiences often go unrecorded. And so she begins in earnest to search out words for her own dictionary: The Dictionary of Lost Words. To do so she must leave the sheltered world of the university and venture out to meet the people whose words will fill those pages.

The Light of Days: The Untold Story of Women Resistance Fighters in Hitler’s Ghettos • Judy Batalion • William Morrow • 6 avril • 560 pages

Witnesses to the brutal murder of their families and neighbors and the violent destruction of their communities, a cadre of Jewish women in Poland—some still in their teens—helped transform the Jewish youth groups into resistance cells to fight the Nazis. With courage, guile, and nerves of steel, these “ghetto girls” paid off Gestapo guards, hid revolvers in loaves of bread and jars of marmalade, and helped build systems of underground bunkers. They flirted with German soldiers, bribed them with wine, whiskey, and home cooking, used their Aryan looks to seduce them, and shot and killed them. They bombed German train lines and blew up a town’s water supply. They also nursed the sick and taught children.

Yet the exploits of these courageous resistance fighters have remained virtually unknown.